by nemoa
Marketing tothe Minds
of Catalog and Etail Shoppers
September 14-16, 2016
Boost Your Email
Marketing Revenue
with...
Background
About Me
• Email Marketing Manager at Phoenix Direct
• 8 Years of Digital Marketing Experience
• MBA, Entrepren...
Agenda
3 Psychologists
10 Principles of Consumer Behavior
Real-life Examples
Influence Checklist
Actionable Takeaways
Background and definitions
How and when to use each
Principles of Influence Checklist
About the Researchers
Robert Cialdini
Kit Yarrow
Dan Ariely
Robert Cialdini
Social Psychology
Theory of Influence
Ph.D. from UNC and post-graduate training
from Columbia University b...
Kit Yarrow
Consumer Psychology
Focus on Millennials
Ph.D. in Psychology
Has conducted hundreds of interviews and
“shop-alo...
Dan Ariely
Behavioral Economics
Decision Making
Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology
A second Ph.D. in Business Administration
In...
10 Principles of Influence
#1 - Reciprocity
When we receive a gift or a favor, we are
obligated to try and repay the favor in kind
#1 - Reciprocity
When we receive a gift or a favor, we are
obligated to try and repay the favor in kind
Nuances of the rul...
#2 – Commitment & Consistency
We’re likely to make future decisions that
match our past behavior
#2 – Commitment & Consistency
We’re likely to make future decisions that match
our past behavior
Nuances of the rule:
• It...
#3 – Social Proof
We look to others to determine how to behave,
especially in uncertain situations
#3 – Social Proof
We look to others to determine how to behave,
especially when we’re uncertain
Nuances of the rule:
• It ...
#4 - Liking
We prefer to say yes to requests from people
we know and like
#4 - Liking
We prefer to say yes to requests from people
we know and like
Nuances of the rule:
• Attractiveness is a facto...
#5 - Authority
We have a deep-seated sense of duty to follow
and react to authority symbols
#5 - Authority
We have a deep-seated sense of duty to follow
and react to authority symbols
Nuances of the rule:
• We resp...
#6 - Scarcity
When something is less available to us, we
want it more
#6 - Scarcity
When something is less available to us, we
want it more
Nuances of the rule:
• Time can be scarce
• Quantiti...
#7 - Relativity
We compare things with one another to make
decisions, and we tend to focus on comparing
things that are ea...
#7 - Relativity
We compare things with one another to help us
make decisions
Nuances of the rule:
• We tend to focus on co...
#8 - The Power of Price
Consumers’ willingness to pay for something
can be easily manipulated
#8 - The Power of Price
Consumers’ willingness to pay for something
can be easily manipulated
Nuances of the rule:
• Witho...
new arrivals
a fa ll s t a p le
We use a special dye and wash method to create a deep and
dusky hues with a remarkably sof...
#9 - Emotional Appeals
We are wired to seek an emotional connection
to the brands and products we buy
#9 - Emotional Appeals
We are wired to seek an emotional connection
to the brands and products we buy
Nuances of the rule:...
#10 - Simplicity
When we are overwhelmed with choices, we
often avoid making any decision at all
#10 - Simplicity
When we are overwhelmed with choices, we
often avoid making any decision at all
Nuances of the rule:
• Si...
Recap
Choose your tactics strategically
Think about your goal and your brand first
Don’t try to use all of them at once!
Reciprocation: We feel obligated to repay
someone when they have given us something.
 Offer free information
 Offer free...
Recommended Reading
by nemoa
Marketing tothe Minds
of Catalog and Etail Shoppers
September 14-16, 2016
Thank you!
Holly Wright
Email Marketing...
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology
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Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology

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Learn tried and true influence techniques studied by the best minds in consumer psychology to boost email marketing revenue. Learn the definitions and nuances of my top 10 principles, and see example email campaigns that I've personally implemented for clients as well as examples from the greater email marketing world.

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Boost Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Psychology

  1. 1. by nemoa Marketing tothe Minds of Catalog and Etail Shoppers September 14-16, 2016 Boost Your Email Marketing Revenue with the Power of Consumer Behavior Holly Wright Email Marketing Manager Phoenix Direct
  2. 2. Background About Me • Email Marketing Manager at Phoenix Direct • 8 Years of Digital Marketing Experience • MBA, Entrepreneurship & Consumer Marketing • BS in Industrial Design, Georgia Tech About Phoenix Direct • 3rd Party Logistics Provider • Creative, Marketing & Ecommerce Agency
  3. 3. Agenda 3 Psychologists 10 Principles of Consumer Behavior Real-life Examples Influence Checklist
  4. 4. Actionable Takeaways Background and definitions How and when to use each Principles of Influence Checklist
  5. 5. About the Researchers Robert Cialdini Kit Yarrow Dan Ariely
  6. 6. Robert Cialdini Social Psychology Theory of Influence Ph.D. from UNC and post-graduate training from Columbia University both in Social Psychology. Spent 3 years undercover working at used car dealerships, fund-raising organizations, and telemarketing firms
  7. 7. Kit Yarrow Consumer Psychology Focus on Millennials Ph.D. in Psychology Has conducted hundreds of interviews and “shop-alongs” to study the trends that transform shopping behavior
  8. 8. Dan Ariely Behavioral Economics Decision Making Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology A second Ph.D. in Business Administration Inspired by his experiences in the burn unit after a serious explosion burned 70% of his body
  9. 9. 10 Principles of Influence
  10. 10. #1 - Reciprocity When we receive a gift or a favor, we are obligated to try and repay the favor in kind
  11. 11. #1 - Reciprocity When we receive a gift or a favor, we are obligated to try and repay the favor in kind Nuances of the rule: • It’s overpowering • It applies to uninvited debts • It can trigger unequal responses
  12. 12. #2 – Commitment & Consistency We’re likely to make future decisions that match our past behavior
  13. 13. #2 – Commitment & Consistency We’re likely to make future decisions that match our past behavior Nuances of the rule: • It can escalate from small to much larger commitments quickly • Commitments “grow their own legs” when people find new reasons to support previous decisions • It can compel people to put themselves in harm’s way
  14. 14. #3 – Social Proof We look to others to determine how to behave, especially in uncertain situations
  15. 15. #3 – Social Proof We look to others to determine how to behave, especially when we’re uncertain Nuances of the rule: • It is applicable under a range of activities • Uncertainty is a big factor • Similarity is a strong factor
  16. 16. #4 - Liking We prefer to say yes to requests from people we know and like
  17. 17. #4 - Liking We prefer to say yes to requests from people we know and like Nuances of the rule: • Attractiveness is a factor • Similarity increases likeability • Compliments make people like you—if they’re true • People form associations easily • Exposure increases familiarity
  18. 18. #5 - Authority We have a deep-seated sense of duty to follow and react to authority symbols
  19. 19. #5 - Authority We have a deep-seated sense of duty to follow and react to authority symbols Nuances of the rule: • We respond more to symbols than actual authority (e.g. a white coat vs. a doctor) • We associate honesty with authority • Authority can be assumed with positioning
  20. 20. #6 - Scarcity When something is less available to us, we want it more
  21. 21. #6 - Scarcity When something is less available to us, we want it more Nuances of the rule: • Time can be scarce • Quantities can be scarce • Value can be scarce • Information can be scarce • Exclusive access is scarce • Newness can be scarce
  22. 22. #7 - Relativity We compare things with one another to make decisions, and we tend to focus on comparing things that are easily compared
  23. 23. #7 - Relativity We compare things with one another to help us make decisions Nuances of the rule: • We tend to focus on comparing things that are easily compared • A decoy can help us rationalize buying something we didn’t previously want
  24. 24. #8 - The Power of Price Consumers’ willingness to pay for something can be easily manipulated
  25. 25. #8 - The Power of Price Consumers’ willingness to pay for something can be easily manipulated Nuances of the rule: • Without context, we do not know how much to pay for a particular item, especially a luxury item • When we have bought or committed to buying something in the past, that price anchors us for future purchases that are similar • We get what we pay for, and discounting can diminish perceived value
  26. 26. new arrivals a fa ll s t a p le We use a special dye and wash method to create a deep and dusky hues with a remarkably soft, lived-in feel for an irresistible shirt. Add a few of our brand new plaid shirts to your fall wardrobe today. today is monday funday! FULL PRICE: $190 MONDAY DEAL: $114 SHOP THIS DEAL 34-heritage light hawaii 5-pocket jeans The monday funday deal is a deep discount taken on a single item for a limited time. Click through this email to redeem the offer before the price goes back up or it sells out!
  27. 27. #9 - Emotional Appeals We are wired to seek an emotional connection to the brands and products we buy
  28. 28. #9 - Emotional Appeals We are wired to seek an emotional connection to the brands and products we buy Nuances of the rule: • Find tribes that align with your products • Excite people with innovation • Build trust with honesty • Use humor to make a connection • Have a mission
  29. 29. #10 - Simplicity When we are overwhelmed with choices, we often avoid making any decision at all
  30. 30. #10 - Simplicity When we are overwhelmed with choices, we often avoid making any decision at all Nuances of the rule: • Simplify your offerings where it makes sense • Turn complex programs into simple transactions • Put your differentiators front and center • Cut down on the work of comparison shopping
  31. 31. Recap Choose your tactics strategically Think about your goal and your brand first Don’t try to use all of them at once!
  32. 32. Reciprocation: We feel obligated to repay someone when they have given us something.  Offer free information  Offer free service/product  Offer free gift  Write in your own: _______________ Commitment and consistency: Once we make a decision or take a stand, we are likely to make future decisions that match past behavior.  Ask users to take an action  Click a button to agree or confirm  Download content  Visit the website  Use previous commitment to your benefit  Remind users of products they have viewed  Position newsletter subscription as a previous commitment  Write in your own: _______________ Social proof: When we’re unsure of something, we validate our decisions based on what other people think is correct.  Suggest services or products based on what others like  Utilize testimonials or reviews  Integrate social media  Show photos of others using your product or service  Write in your own: _______________ Liking: We say “yes” to individuals we know and like.  Use photos of smiling, happy people  Utilize celebrity endorsements  Show user’s friends or peers who use your product or service  Associate your company with positive things  Use imagery of people in your users’ demographics  Write in your own: _______________ Authority: We follow and react to authority symbols.  Show people in uniforms  Show (or create your own) certification logos  Show logos of well-known companies who use your product or service  Use copy that positions you as the expert  Write in your own: _______________ Scarcity: If something is less available to us, we want it more.  Include limited time offers  Position timely content as going away soon  Add expiration date to your current offerings  Use deadlines to your advantage  Write in your own: _______________ Consumer Behavior Principles Checklist By Holly Wright, Phoenix Direct (@hollygowrightly) Relativity: We tend to compare things that are easily compared in order to make decisions.  Provide a decoy  Carry a higher priced item for comparison, even if it is in very limited quantities  Make the comparison as easy as possible  Write in your own: _______________ Pricing: We tend to get what we pay for, but we’re also bargain hunters.  Target sale buyer differently than full price buyers  Use coupons judiciously  Price luxury items to convey the value that you want your shoppers to perceive  Have a theme for ongoing or recurring deals  When discounting isn’t an option, offer a free gift or exclusive access instead  Write in your own: _______________ Emotional Appeal: We are wired to seek emotional connections from the brands we buy  Demonstrate empathy and humanity  Build trust with consistency and a customer service approach  Use humor  Have a secondary mission or purpose  Align your business with a charity or cause  Write in your own: _______________ Simplicity: When we’re overwhelmed with choices, we make no choice at all.  Simplify your offerings, where it makes sense  Turn complex program into simple transactions  Put your differentiators front and center  Cut down on the work of comparison shopping  Write in your own: _______________
  33. 33. Recommended Reading
  34. 34. by nemoa Marketing tothe Minds of Catalog and Etail Shoppers September 14-16, 2016 Thank you! Holly Wright Email Marketing Manager Phoenix Direct @hollygowrightly hwright@phoenixdirect.com (770) 667-8833 x 125

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