MockUp_BusinessModel

63 visualizações

Publicada em

  • Seja o primeiro a comentar

  • Seja a primeira pessoa a gostar disto

MockUp_BusinessModel

  1. 1.             Home Unity   Business Plan         Contact Information:  Gregory Long, CEO  greglong@umich.edu​ | 517­605­2022  1006 Packard Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48104      December 14, 2015 | Copy 1 of 1        Disclaimer: This business plan has been submitted on a confidential basis solely to selected, highly qualified investors. The recipient should not  reproduce this plan or distribute it to others without permission. Please return this copy if you do not wish to invest in the company.   
  2. 2. 1.   Executive Summary    Home Unity is a company motivated by making the use of electrical devices safer and more efficient.  Instead of redeveloping the thousands of electrical devices that an individual will interact with on a daily  basis, we decided to address the outlet instead. An individual will interact with a number of electrical  devices each day without the slightest thought that each could be a potential fire hazard if left unattended.  While the risk of a fire hazard is the primary concern, a second issue regards appliances that draw power  even they are turned off. While this use of energy rarely gets noticed, it quickly adds up in monthly bills.     To make the home a safer and more efficient space, we would like to introduce smart outlets that together  create a smart “spark” electrical grid focused entirely on helping homeowners create a safe home  environment and save money on energy bills. These outlets, connected to smartphone devices, have a  range of different features, including: 1) capability of GPS location recognition to automatically turn off  selected appliances when located a certain distance away from the home, 2) remote control of the exact  current powering the outlet, and 3) wireless sensors that will turn off “vampire” appliances drawing  unnecessary energy.     Frost & Sullivan, a research market firm, predicts that the market for connected homes, workplaces, and  cities could be valued at over $700 billion by 2020. There are already a host of players with market share,  including cell phone carriers (AT&T), IT giants (Google), home improvement stores (Lowe’s), and  equipment manufacturers (Samsung), but all of them hold a broad approach of creating a smart home.  While many of these players have experienced success, we are attempting to resegment the market. We  have differentiated ourselves by creating features that narrow the category of a smart home into safety and  energy savings. By emphasizing only the outlet and the smartphone, we can provide these solutions at a  low cost. In addition, we plan on offering installation services to increase customer satisfaction, despite  the negative effect on profit margin. Based on customer discovery, we are targeting tech savvy individuals  aged 25­55 that are purchasing or renovating homes and spend $150+ on electricity per month.     Home Unity’s revenue stream includes a direct­to­customer online sales platform along with a  distribution channel to end users through home improvement stores and electrical contractors. As Home  Unity grows, the principal costs will be associated with the R&D investments to create an operational  prototype along with licensing and testing costs to ensure the highest level of product quality. The team  will create brand awareness through direct marketing–interacting with customers directly, gaining  feedback, and making them see the value in Home Unity products–as well as a mix of paid and earned  demand creation activities. Upon product launch, the team plans to file a patent to protect the invention.    All 4 founders are seniors majoring in Industrial and Operations Engineering (IOE) at the University of  Michigan with experience in auditing, cost analysis, marketing, project management, and quality control.  Since we lack technical skills in the field of computer science, we will hire affiliate personnel to help us  with the development with the smartphone application. We are seeking $200,000 in exchange for a full  repayment of the loan by year 3 and $1 royalties for each additional unit sold thereafter. We expect to  start generating profit by month 18 and break even by month 22. We estimate reaching $3.5 million  dollars in revenue by year 3.           
  3. 3. Table of Contents    1. Executive Summary................................................................................................................................ 2  2. Industry, Customer & Competitor Analysis........................................................................................ 5  2.1 Industry Opportunity.............................................................................................................. 5  2.2 Industry Overview................................................................................................................... 6  2.3 Market Type............................................................................................................................. 6  2.4 Industry Economics................................................................................................................. 6  2.5 Industry Trends........................................................................................................................ 6  3. Customer Profile..................................................................................................................................... 7  3.1 Customer Demographics......................................................................................................... 7  3.2 Customer Habits...................................................................................................................... 8  3.3 Customer Needs........................................................................................................................ 8  4. Competition............................................................................................................................................. 8  4.1 Key Competitive Attributes.................................................................................................... 8  4.2 Competitive Profile Matrix..................................................................................................... 9  5. Company and Product Description....................................................................................................... 9  5.1 Company Overview.................................................................................................................. 9  5.2 Key Achievements.................................................................................................................... 9  5.3 Product Value Proposition...................................................................................................... 9  5.4 Differentiating Features........................................................................................................ 10  5.5 Market Entry Strategy.......................................................................................................... 10  5.6 Long­Term Growth Strategy................................................................................................ 10  6. Marketing Plan...................................................................................................................................... 11  6.1 Target Market Strategy......................................................................................................... 11  6.2 Product Strategy.................................................................................................................... 11  6.3 Distribution Strategy............................................................................................................. 12  6.4 Pricing Strategy...................................................................................................................... 12  6.5 Marketing Communication Strategy................................................................................... 14  6.6 Sales Strategy.......................................................................................................................... 14  6.7 Sales Forecast......................................................................................................................... 15  6.8 Marketing Forecast................................................................................................................ 15  7. Operations Plan..................................................................................................................................... 15  7.1 Operations Strategy............................................................................................................... 16  8. Development Plan.................................................................................................................................. 16  8.1 Development Strategy............................................................................................................ 17  9. Team....................................................................................................................................................... 18  9.1 Team Bios................................................................................................................................ 18  9.2 Roles........................................................................................................................................ 18  9.3 Affiliate Personnel.................................................................................................................. 18  10. Critical Risks....................................................................................................................................... 18  10.1 Market Interest and Growth Potential.............................................................................. 19  10.2 Competitor Action and Retaliation.................................................................................... 19  10.3 Time and Cost of Development........................................................................................... 19  10.4 Operating Expenses............................................................................................................. 19  10.5 Availability and Timing of Financing................................................................................ 19  10.6 Intellectual Property Theft................................................................................................. 19  11. Offering................................................................................................................................................ 19 
  4. 4. 11.1 Capital Required.................................................................................................................. 19  11.2 Sources of Funds.................................................................................................................. 20  11.3 Use of funds........................................................................................................................... 20  12. Financial Plan...................................................................................................................................... 21  12.1 Cash Flows Projection......................................................................................................... 21  12.2 Payback Plan........................................................................................................................ 22                                                                            
  5. 5. 2.   Industry, Customer & Competitor Analysis    2.1 Industry Opportunity  In 2011, there were 47,700 home electrical fires reported solely within the United States.  Resulting from  these fires were 418 civilian deaths, 1,570 civilian injuries, and $1.4 billion in direct property damage  (Hall, “Electrical Fires”). What is the root cause of these fires?  All but 6% of these fires were either  caused by appliances, lighting, and wiring within the household itself (Hall, “Electrical Fires”).  $1.4  billion is a daunting number, and even a marginal decrease in this number provides financial incentive. In  addition to monetary stimulation, we have the opportunity to save lives and reduce the emotional burden  experienced by the families who happen to go through a tragedy of this caliber.  While appliances and  electricity are getting safer, the risk of fire will never cease to exist.  The United States have experienced a  relatively constant amount of homefires over the last 15 years, with the total number never dropping  below 300,000 in total.    Coupled with the goal to increase the safety of the general population, there is an excellent opportunity to  start in on another market: energy efficiency. “Vampire” energy is the concept that appliances draw  power even when they are turned off (in standby mode). It accounts for 4%­10% of the energy  consumption of residential homes, totaling an estimated 52 billion kWh/year (“Smart Home Market ­  Trend and Forecast to 2020”). Homeowners could save an average of $165 per year, creating a potential  of $19 billion in energy savings in the United States (Claudio and O’Malley).  The highest consuming  culprits are illustrated in Figure 1, many of which the average household owns.   Figure 1: Estimated Annual Cost of “Vampire” Appliances  2.2 Industry Overview  The product directly fits into the smart home market. With the Internet of Things (IoT) constantly  growing, the potential for interconnectivity within homes appears to be increasing exponentially. By  2020, it is estimated that there will be 26 billion connected devices worldwide, creating a market value of  over $700 billion by that same year (Claudio & O’Malley). To narrow this down further, experts predict  that the connected home market alone will have a potential market value of around $110 billion (Claudio  & O’Malley).  The broad smart home market, however, encompasses many features that are not of Home  Unity’s interest. Even when narrowing this smart home market down slightly, there is still significant  potential for rapid growth and scalability. Home energy management technologies are currently estimated 
  6. 6. at $512 million and are expected to grow over 500% over the next 5 years to a market value of $2.8  billion (Claudio & O’Malley).      2.3 Market Type  The smart home market can be broken down into many products, including home security systems, smart  appliances, and sensored lighting. Many players in the market are attempting to incorporate a massive  network of these products. We are resegmenting the market, however, by focusing on strictly the outlet to  both increasing safety and energy savings, 2 characteristics that other players are not fully addressing.  Specifically, we aim to to bridge the gap between convenience and efficiency by emphasizing automation  in the product.     We aim to implement an entire system of outlets within a household at a time. In addition to providing a  high level of convenience for the customer, this strategy allows us to offer the product at a lower cost than  competitors. By focusing on the outlet itself and offering low costs, we think we can seamlessly  resegment the smart home market.    2.4 Industry Economics  During the ramp up production period, we estimate a profit margin of $10.00 per outlet when selling the  product directly to the customer. For those who are not knowledgeable enough to install the outlet  themselves, we will originally offer an internally run installation service for them at a flat rate of $50.00.  In the future, however, we aim to partner with a third party electrical contractors and home improvement  stores who will perform the installation themselves. Although the profit margins will drop to $8.00 per  outlet and $7.00 per outlet, respectively, the partnership will help us scale the product. As with any  manufacturing based product, as the volume of products increases, the cost of goods will decrease,  allowing Home Unity to either increase the profit margin or lower product/installation service prices to  remain competitive from an economic standpoint.    As mentioned earlier, we aim to implement an entire system of outlets within a household at a time. Let’s  say a household comprises 20 outlets. With the installation service internally run, the profit margin will be  $250.00 per system of outlets (20 outlets*$10.00/outlet + $50 flat rate). With the third party installation  service, the profit margins will drop to $160.00 per system of outlets for the electrical contractor (20  outlets*$8.00/outlet) and $140.00 per system of outlets for the home improvement store (20  outlets*$7.00/outlet). The profit margins are further detailed in the ​Pricing Strategy​ section.    2.5 Industry Trends  The global smart home market was valued at $20.38 billion last year and expects to grow by 17%  annually over the next 5 years to reach an estimated $56.68 billion in 2020 (“Smart Home Markets”).  Last year alone, there were some massive acquisitions of IoT companies, as illustrated in Figure 2,  pertaining to the smart home market, led by Google’s acquisition of smart thermostat maker Nest for $3.2  Billion. These acquisitions are a measure of success of the smart home market and suggest that many  others can enter unique products into it without a fear of lack of interest, both from consumers and  investors alike.  
  7. 7.   Figure 2: Acquisitions of IoT companies by Technology Giants in 2014  With the smart home revolution quickly expanding, a significant trend that can be pulled from Figure 2 is  the Internet of Things beginning to affect every aspect of lives. Even amongst startups, the top 10  companies in this market today are valued at a combined $2.229 Billion (​"10 Most Valued Internet of  Things Startups."​).    Another trend that many are not noticing is the price of energy. Unfortunately for many homeowners,  there is not much to be done about this.  Over the next 20 years, MaRS predicts energy consumption to  increase by 29%, coupled with a rise in expected energy prices by as much as 42% in some areas.  (Claudio and O’Malley).      3.   Customer Profile    3.1 Customer Demographics  Home Unity’s customer demographic shifted significantly upon speaking with potential customers. While  all individuals will be welcome to purchase the product, we will focus on those that are building or  renovating a home. Through Home Unity’s market research, we believe that customers would be more apt  to purchase the product if they’re already in the process of construction. When homes are under  construction of some type, it means that either homeowners are knowledgeable about the workings of  home construction or hiring a third party contractor to do this work for them. This provides the  opportunity for the customer to install the product with little or no additional cost due to installation  complications.      To narrow down the target market further, Home Unity will be focusing on customers aged 25 to 55.  While college students would be an ideal market due to willingness to quickly adapt to trends and  technologies, energy bills are not high enough on college campuses for them to justify the purchase of the  product. The reason Home Unity shied away from older homeowners is the unlikelihood for them to adapt 
  8. 8. to technology. Older homeowners are generally content enough to simply switch from incandescent to  LED lights to reduce the energy footprint. Therefore, here at Home Unity, we believe that the ideal age  ranges from 25 to 55, where homeowners are old enough to earn disposable income and have high energy  bills and young enough to trust technology as well as pay for the convenience that it will provide.    Figure 3: Narrowing the Total Addressable Market down to the Target Market    3.2 Customer Habits  By identifying key customer habits, it provides the ability to better market to these individuals within the  target customer profile. It is key that the customers are familiar with smartphone technology, as this is  part of the backbone of the product. This is not a huge issue, as in 2014, there were 171 Million  smartphone users in the United States alone (“​Smartphone Users in the US 2010­2019”)​.     The dependency on technology results in high energy bills. We think we can reduce energy bills by 10%  to 20%, the desired range expressed by potential users during customer discovery interviews.      3.3 Customer Needs  Many consumers want but don’t necessarily need the products purchased today. Everyone loves to save  money, and it may be need for some people. The key need, here, that every individual desires is a peace  of mind. By providing a product that enhances safety that could potentially save thousands of dollars in  property damage on top of extensive emotional turmoil, Home Unity can provide homeowners with a  peace of mind.      4.   Competition    4.1 Key Competitive Attributes  As illustrated in the competitive profile matrix below (Figure 4), there are already a host of players in the  market, including cell phone carriers (AT&T), IT giants (Google), home improvement stores (Lowe’s),  and equipment manufacturers (Samsung). All of these players focused on creating a smart home through a  combination of programmable thermostats, sensors, and smartphone applications, giving customers  remote control of appliances. They’re attempting to change the home experience on a wide scale. We are  deviating from the smart home market and shifting emphasis on safety and savings on energy bills. With  GPS location recognition on the smartphone application, for example, appliances will automatically turn  off when you are a certain distance away from your home. Therefore, we rid the customer of the burden to  remembering to turn off appliances. Meanwhile, we think that providing ​remote control of the exact  current powering each outlet and incorporating sensors that prevent “vampire” draws are unique features  that will help customers cut down on energy bills.    
  9. 9. 4.2 Competitive Profile Matrix  Figure 4: Competitive Matrix    5.   Company and Product Description    5.1 Company Overview  Home Unity was founded in Ann Arbor, MI in October of 2015.  The founding members were Greg  Long, Neil Kothari, Luke Laidlaw, and Eric Hsiao. This team’s vision was to bring safety and efficiency  to all household appliances, old and new. By providing convenience with mobile command over electrical  outlets in addition to providing smart sensors that will automatically turn off the appliances for a number  of circumstances, we at Home Unity believe that bringing together safety and efficiency can be easily  accomplishable.    5.2 Key Achievements  Key achievements have been made in the process of ramping up staff and concepts to begin developing.  Ending on November 4, 2015 Home Unity completed a first round of 20 customer interviews, allowing us  to determine customer value and pivot the concepts as necessary. These initial interviews surfaced enough  interest, prompting Home Unity to add the following key members into the respective roles:  ● Michael Gramza​ ​­ Advisory Board  ● Benjamin Hui ­ Director of Compliance and Legal Affairs  ● James Lee ­ Senior Hardware Engineer  ● Miguel Olivares ­ Senior Software Engineer    5.3 Product Value Proposition  The goal of this product is to provide a comprehensive solution to the safety and efficiency within the  average household. By providing cost­sensitive installation assistance and superior customer service,  Home Unity aims to allow customers to achieve a peace of mind, save $100+ in electricity costs per year,  and reduce the energy footprint, all with minimal inconvenience. 
  10. 10.   5.4 Differentiating Features  The basis of the concept was initially designed around the feature of remotely controlling the outlets  “on/off” feature, allowing the user to check and maintain the status of the appliance anytime from  anywhere. Since many competitors already provide this feature, we want to differentiate the product from  the existing market, and the key features we have added reflect that. The first additions to the product aim  to keep the convenience factor alive within the home. We realize that if we provide the capability to turn  on/off appliances, the customer will only get value out of this product only a fraction of the time. The  incorporated sensors into the outlet allow for the control of the exact current powering each outlet as well  as the detection of any “vampire” energy draws. With the fast­paced environment of the world today,  “vampire’ appliances are in standby mode for a reason: to make the start­up times of these appliances  marginal. To overcome this concern, the outlet includes GPS location recognition capabilities, allowing  the system to automatically turn on/off the appliances when homeowners are a certain distance away from  homes (distance can be adjusted based on homeowner preference).    5.5 Market Entry Strategy  We have performed significant amounts of research to determine the optimal strategy for market entry. At  the end of 2013, Houzz performed a research study to observe the renovation trends of Americans. The  results confirmed that a significant portion of Americans are planning on building or renovating homes  every year, 40% of those surveyed to be exact. Even more significant was the amount homeowners  planned to spend, with kitchen remodels tallying $28,000 and bathroom models tallying $10,000. Since  this provides ample market opportunity, we have pinpointed homeowners building or renovating homes  as the early adopters of the product.    How we reach these customers may be the next logical question when entering a market. The most  efficient way to ensure customer happiness and loyalty would be to connect with them directly. Seeking  out these customers will be done either through direct contact or at local hardware stores and trade shows.  While this is a more difficult approach, by beginning on a local scale, it provides strong connections with  the customer and low marketing costs, allowing Home Unity to build the desired reputation of high  quality products and excellent customer relations.    5.6  Long­Term Growth Strategy    Long­term growth can be broken into 4 key phases: development, market entry, market expansion, and  company expansion, as outlined in Figure 5.    Figure 5: Long­Term Growth Strategy Timeline   
  11. 11. Under the development period, the primary goal is to acquire the key members to begin developing and  testing the product to ensure that it provides the results that were promised to the prospective customer.  We hope to complete all of the product development and testing 8 months after the founding of the  company. Within this 8 month period, multiple prototypes will be developed and a significant amount of  initial capital investment will go into testing the product. The initial motive behind this product was to  make the household safer, thus all resources necessary will be expended to ensure safety As the  prototypes are developed, the software team will simultaneously work on the smartphone application.    When the product gets sufficiently tested and the application to go along with it is completely debugged,  the next phase will be to enter the market. It is projected around 9 months after the founding of the  company, manufacturing sources will be obtained and mass production of the product will begin. When a  reliable mass manufactured product gets approved, it will hit the local market to sell directly to customers.  As revenue starts to come in, thereby verifying the market, Home Unity will seek additional capital  funding in order to scale the business.    It is projected that 18 months after the founding of the company, the product will have gained enough  market value to obtain financial stability. From here, contracts with large home improvement stores will  be sought out to solidify the home renovation market. Partnering with large home improvement stores  will allow the product to reach homeowners performing renovations on a national scale. In addition,  strategic business partners will be acquired to outsource installation services to electric contractors to  begin entering the new construction market. By acquiring such partners, it will provide significant  expansion opportunities. These key additions over an estimated 2.5­year period will allow Home Unity to  scale the business at a sustainable rate.     After the initial 4­year growth initiatives, attention will be turned to retaining customer loyalty as well as  providing firmware and product upgrades. In addition, a new product development team will begin to be  assembled in order to keep up with the rapid smart home trend currently sweeping the globe. It is  important to stay relevant if a company would like to stay in business for a long duration.    6.   Marketing Plan    6.1 Target Market Strategy  As described previously, the target market includes homeowners aged 25 and 55 that are planning on  building or renovating homes. The most effective target market strategy will be the direct marketing  tactic. The leverage this tactic provides is the direct product exposure to potential customers. While these  tactics historically include database marketing, fliers, catalog distribution, email, and consumer websites,  the most important aspect of the target market campaign will be to show the customer the value  proposition of the product.    By focusing efforts on the more personal marketing tactics such as consumer websites and direct contact  with the customer, solid public relations can begin to be established. Local customers in the vicinity of  Home Unity’s headquarters will initially look to consider the product, as opposed to nationwide  customers.    6.2 Product Strategy  In order to compete with a large number of other corporations, we are relying on what makes Home  Unity’s product different. As discussed in detail in the ​Differentiating Features​ section, we plan to let 
  12. 12. the key features of GPS technology, current control, and vampire device detection elevate Home Unity’s  product above the competition.      6.3 Distribution Strategy  Distribution is a key factor in regards to marketing as well as pricing strategy. We hope to use multiple  channels of distribution that can be summarized into 2 major channels: direct and third party. Within the  challenges of each unique distribution channel, there is the overlying challenge of supply chain to  maintain such channels. On a local scale, distribution by internal staff can be sustainable, but as soon as  the distribution channels begin sprawling to various regions, a third party organization will be utilized to  handle the transportation of goods throughout the distribution channels. The size of this organization will  be determined by the volume and the end location of the product. A multitude of different resources may  be utilized in order to manage varying order volumes.      Direct to customer distribution will be the easiest channel to administer. As mentioned in the ​Target  Market Strategy​ section, the direct to customer channel is a component of Home Unity’s business  model. This strategy will be the most effective during the initial stages of the company.      Distribution to third parties will be a little more difficult to execute. The 2 key channels would be to  electrical contractors and home improvement stores. The first distribution channel to open would be to  home improvement stores. By acquiring partnerships with this large distributors, it takes a majority of the  distribution effort out of Home Unity’s operational structure. The large networks of home improvement  stores, such as Home Depot and Lowe’s, would allow for rapid scaling of the company to reach a steadily  expanding target market.      As a solid distribution channel with home improvement stores gets established, distribution efforts can be  refocused on a second target market: new construction. A new distribution channel provides new  challenges. The demand for the product within this channel would vary on a number of factors, including  but not limited to economic factors, seasonality, and geographical location. This channel will promote  installation in bulk, as the entire household would most likely be outfitted with the product.      6.4 Pricing Strategy  The pricing strategy for the product stays rather constant with regards to sale price. We project the outlet  to sell at $35.00, well below competitor pricing, as detailed in Figure 6.       Figure 6: Pricing Structure for Direct Sales    By selling product directly to the customer, Home Unity would experience the greatest profit margin of  $10.00 per outlet. However, during the beginning stages of sales, installation will be handled internally at  a flat rate of $50.00. The reason for including a flat rate rather than a per unit pricing structure is the  likelihood for multiple units to be installed at 1 time. The limitations to this are the number of customers  that can be serviced directly by the company.    In order to increase sales, third party channels are needed as described earlier. By expanding the  distribution structure to home improvement stores, the profit margin decreases slightly per outlet sold. 
  13. 13. The objective behind this business move is to offset profit loss experienced by selling through a third  party distributor by the profit gained from the increased volume of sale. In addition to this benefit,  installation services will be outsourced to either the DIY home renovator or by the home improvement  stores services itself. This would also alleviate any losses due to internal installation performed by Home  Unity. Figure 7 highlights the pricing structure, given that home improvement stores install the outlets.      Figure 7: Pricing Structure for Sales to Third Party Home Improvement Stores     Targeting sales to electrical contractors to install in renovation projects and new construction provides a  third channel of revenue. While sales are at a slightly higher price than home improvement stores, it is  expected that electric contractors will still be willing to purchase this product in high volume. These  contractors will already be onsite performing electrical services, so no additional installation costs will be  experienced, as would be in the case of direct sales and home improvement stores. Also, by installing  these outlets in high volume for the entirety of a new home, we envision that the profit gained strictly  through pure volume will be incentive enough to accept this slightly smaller profit margin. Figure 8  highlights the pricing structure, given that electric contractors install the outlets.      Figure 8: Pricing Structure For Sales to Third Party Electrical Contractors    Table 1 provides estimates Home Unity profit for households of varying sizes. The costs are estimated  assuming a sale price of $35.00 outlet and installation handled entirely by electrical contractors.    Household Description  Sq­ft Size  Outlet  Count  Cost for Complete  Household Installation  Contractor Profit  Home Unity  Profit  4 Bedroom 1 Story Home  2,444  112  $3,920.00  $224.00  $896.00  3 Bedroom 1 Story Home  1,997  92  $3,220.00  $184.00  $736.00  2 Bedroom 1 Story Home  1,032  62  $2,170.00  $124.00  $496.00  1 Bedroom 1 Story Home  665  46  $1,610.00  $92.00  $368.00    Disclaimer:  All results are based on the minimum number of outlets allowed, limiting the maximum space between outlets  being 6 linear ft. This also omits any desired additional outlets in high use rooms such as the kitchen. This  analysis also omits any outlets on the exterior of the house.  Table 1: Estimates of Entire Household Installation   
  14. 14. When averaging the price across all size homes, it results in $1.94 per sq­ft of space in order to install this  system throughout the entire household. While the prices are relatively high, this is why the target market  includes those experiencing electricity bills greater that $150. At the low end, a user will be experiencing  energy savings of 5%­10% per month, which equates to $180 saved per year. Initial customers will most  likely only install a dozen or so of these outlets in high usage areas, bringing the price to $420 plus any  third party installation if needed. This investment gets returned in less than 3 years if strictly viewing the  decision from a financial perspective. The desire to install these outlets throughout the entirety of the  house, however, will be a marginal increase in the price of the construction of a new home and would  provide savings for years on end. If the trend of outfitting the entirety of a new household gains traction,  this would provide opportunities for mass quantity discounts, leading to future partnership opportunities.    6.5 Marketing Communication Strategy  A mix of paid vs. earned demand creation activities will be utilized in order to ensure that the target  market gets exposed to the product. Possible expansion and partnership opportunities will also be  addressed through a mixture of these communication strategies.     Paid advertisement would cause a loss in profit, absorbed under the broader title of operations costs.  Nonetheless, this is an essential type of advertising for product exposure to the initial target market.  Advertising will be utilized to gain exposure and open the direct to customer channel. Trade shows will  also be vital in exposing the product to the electrical community on a broader scale. By drawing attention  to the value proposition and differentiating features, Home Unity aims to gain interest and partnerships  with electrical contracting firms. Both of these types of demand creation are heavily based on the  customer­provider interaction. This allows the opportunity to accentuate the importance of public  relations, which will ultimately define the culture and perception of Home Unity.    After the initial expenses associated with paid demand creation are endured, the most next step is to  evolve the public relations campaign to community involvement rather than advertisement.  Upon  establishment of the product, it is equally important to maintain a positive image. This will be  accomplished by joining communities related to reducing energy use as well as increasing home safety,  electrical innovation, and other related areas.    6.6 Sales Strategy  The most important aspect of Home Unity’s sales strategy is to provide the customer direct access to the  core team. Providing support from internal members promotes the exact image that Home Unity aims to  define for itself, as it allows for a relationship to be built and for us to advocate the importance of  alleviating customers pains.      When outsourcing the sale of product to third party sources, the relationship is no less important. The goal  is to treat these third party institutions, just as we would the direct customers. By providing expertise on  product knowledge, installation experience, and customer support, these third parties can then impart  customers with this knowledge.    Customer relations is the key backbone of the sales strategy, allowing for the retention of customers that  produces the possibility further sales through referrals. By expanding product sales into third party  sources, it provides substantially larger sales opportunities, not only in volume but also market type.         
  15. 15. 6.7 Sales Forecast  We project 50 units of sales in the first month upon product launch. While the initial volume of sales may  below, it is expected to increase by 15% every month thereafter in the first year. When we partner with  home improvement stores beginning in the second year of operations, it will bring in an additional 150  units sold in that month. We hope to maintain this jump with a growth of 15%, as more stores are brought  on and product exposure gets expanded. Halfway through the second year, we project that we will begin  to partner with electrical contractors and begin to gain an exponentially larger volume of sales within the  home renovation market and new sales within the new construction market. This increase would be an  initial jump in 1,000 units sold per month with another projection of 15% growth every month thereafter  until the end of the third year. After that, forecasts will have to be readjusted to account for changes in  industry and market growth potential. Figure 9 provides a visual for the sales forecast.      Figure 9: Sales Forecast Visual    6.8 Marketing Forecast  Marketing will be an important factor in relation to exposure as well as costs during the development  period. With little to no revenue experienced during the initial development phase, it is still important to  gain exposure before the product gets launched on the market. During this period, marketing expenses  will be funded by investments made from various sources of financial assets. A focus will be placed on  direct marketing.    The next stage of marketing will commence when the product officially launches to market. From here, it  will be essential to join electrical communities at the time of product launch in order to obtain the key  electrical contracting partners that are projected to be acquired by month 18. In the early months of this  period, funding will come from capital investments, but will also be deducted from profit margins as soon  as we establish a steady revenue stream from product sales.     After partnerships are established and market traction gets acquired, the marketing strategy will shift from  gaining additional exposure to maintaining product interest and customer loyalty. A majority of the  marketing budget will be reallocated into the public relations sector to ensure that customers and third  party distributors are experiencing the highest level of customer service. This will be directly funded from  the revenue streams.    7.   Operations Plan  As a manufacturing company, there will be unavoidable overhead costs involved, but we hope to limit  these costs initially and create a solid production timeline in order to prevent the incurrence of any  unnecessary or premature operating costs. We will stress high quality and will have to bear the costs that  come with ensuring that high quality . Additional cautionary measures will be taken with inspection and  testing, as the safety of customers comes first and foremost.    
  16. 16. We will be timely in the delivery of products and execute upon deadlines. Through careful planning and  the diligent allocation of tasks, the team aims to meet all deadlines, despite any unforeseen difficulties  within the product launch process. We will have to make a point to be flexible in order to remain  competitive. As a small company, we have the ability to quickly change plans as necessary to ensure swift  and effective solutions to any challenges we may face.     Employees will be contracted to reduce labor costs as we develop as a company. During infancy, we will  need be bound by a stringent budget and will hire employees on an as needed basis.     We will have to meet all regulations as a licensed professional manufacturer of certified electrical  equipment to be used in consumer households. The company will develop a strong legal team to ensure  that we have a secure hold and understanding of all such liabilities that come with being an electrical  supply manufacturer. We will hold safety and quality to the highest of standards.     Home Unity’s initial infrastructure is the founder’s home to reduce overhead costs during early  development stages. As the prototype travels through iterations and enters mass production, the company  will be able to bear the costs of moving to a permanent manufacturing facility.    Figure 10 relays the steps of the production process of an outlet.      Figure 10: Steps of the Production Process  7.1 Operations Strategy  In the early stages, day­to­day activities are managed by the 4 original team members and the company  will be buying most of the components to create the prototypes as a means of keeping overhead costs to a  minimum. As we grow and create a manufacturing plant, we will be able to move some of the production  methods in­house to reduce certain costs within the production process. When the company grows to a  point that we cannot oversee daily operations, an operations manager will be hired.    Home Unity originated in Ann Arbor, MI. As a midwestern manufacturing company,  we are in  America’s heartland, a great place to be located for eventual distribution across the United States. With  close proximity to Detroit, MI and surrounding areas, there are many resources for the team to get started  as an electrical manufacturer. This includes strategic partnership opportunities with electrical contractors,  home improvement stores, and electrical component suppliers.     The supply chain will expand as we grow as a company. Initial offerings will be local and can grow when  we secure enough capital to contract trucks for large shipments. We will attempt to identify and build  strong relationships with  local suppliers to keep shipping costs to a minimum.    8.   Development Plan  Through careful planning, we have formed a product creation method:  i. Create an AutoCAD model of the smart outlet. 
  17. 17. ii. Begin first stages of the prototype.  iii. App development ­ overseen by Miguel Olivares.  iv. Continue multiple prototype iterations to create MVP.  v. Conduct extensive testing of the MVP to ensure reliability and safety and that the product passes  all Underwriter’s Laboratories (UL) specifications.  vi. Obtain a patent pending so that Home Unity does need to divulge drawings for one year.  vii. Product ready for first manufacturing run.    In order to carry out the product creation method, there are several key product development resources  that are crucial in ensuring a successful outcome. Engineering design is a very important resource and will  assist our team directly in all phases of the design of the physical outlet. Reliability engineers will be of  tremendous value as they do extensive testing to ensure the safety of the product before it is released to  market. In order to create a strong relationship with customers, installation partners will ensure a quick  and efficient installation of the designed product. Figure 11 outlines Home Unity’s 3­year launch  projection.       Figure 11: Launch Projection    8.1 Development Strategy  During the development phase, the team acknowledges the associated risks in order to maintain a  proactive approach to creating a successful business. The overutilization of resources could add high  economic costs and potential delays to product development. To avoid this, we plan to carefully allot  resources through previous planning experiences and forecasting methods. If we produce batch sizes that  are too large, we could have unnecessary expenses that have adverse effects on the projected development  time frame. If we are not open to new ideas as we move forward, we could fail to reach the desired  product. Failure to pivot or make enough product iterations is not an option for the team as we move  towards a successful product line. If the team incorporates more features than necessary, we put ourselves  at an unnecessarily high burn rate. By identifying the key risks involved during the development process,  we are confident that we can mitigate said risks before becoming detrimental to the desired goal.      
  18. 18. 9.   Team    9.1 Team Bios  We are a group of senior students majoring in Industrial and Operations Engineering (IOE) at the  University of Michigan. All of us share an interest in green energy as well as household safety and have  entrepreneurial mindsets. We have experience in auditing, cost analysis, marketing, project management,  and quality control.    9.2 Roles  CEO: Gregory Long–responsible for the vision and direction of the company, ensuring that the actions  performed by the foundational team and members within are propelling the company forward.  This is in  regards to the foundation the company was built upon, by advancing the electrical community through  safety, efficiency, and convenience.    CTO: Neil Kothari–responsible for maintaining a sound technical platform, overseeing the development  of new technologies to ensure that the company’s technical direction evolves over time, and creating  options for existing and new businesses.    COO: Luke Laidlaw–responsible for the daily operations of the company and driving the organization  towards world class operational excellence. Routinely reports to the CEO (Gregory Long), and assists  CTO (Neil Kothari) in the R&D phases of the product.    CFO: Eric Hsiao–responsible for controlling any cash flow of the company, monitoring all company  liabilities, and generating customer value as well as making financial suggestions to executive officers.  Also responsible for making adjustments to the financial plan and seek for funding to finance the project      9.3 Affiliate Personnel  Advisory Board: Michael Gramza, ​MS Engn, MBA–​responsible for providing strategic advice to the  management of the company    Director of Compliance and Legal Affairs: Benjamin Hui–responsible for patent research, patent filing  and certification qualification     Senior Hardware Engineer: James Lee–responsible for design and support of complex analog and digital  circuitry as well as design verification     Senior Software Engineer: Miguel Olivares–responsible for APP development, functionality testing and  platform maintenance      10.   Critical Risks    10.1 Market Interest and Growth Potential  After market research, we developed great confidence about the potential of the product. Therefore, we  expect to have 15% growth for each month.​ ​This growth rate of 15% for each month is a realistic, but also  a highly optimistic projection. Failing to achieve 15% growth may not only postpone the payback plan,  but could potentially lead to the exhaustion of capital investments.       
  19. 19.   10.2 Competitor Action and Retaliation  There are several big companies already in existence within the market and due to an abundance  resources, some can potentially catch up by quickly developing and launching products that are similar to  ours. Therefore, if the product fails to obtain enough market share or competitors respond aggressively,  the product may grow at a much slower rate than we expect. Moreover, the financial plan and sales  projection are structured in such a way that we are expecting partner with local stores by month 12 and  retailers/contractors by month 18. Failing to partner with other firms may negatively affect the financial  plan.    10.3 Time and Cost of Development  As we are trying to minimize the cost of the product to make it affordable to customers, we will need to  conduct experiments to test different designs of the product, requiring both time and money. We have  allocated 8 months for 3 generations of prototypes to complete the final design of the product. Failing to  complete the final product within this 8 month period will not only delay the launching schedule, but also  result in a shortage of funding. To mitigate this risk, we will try to obtain the most experienced personnel  to join the development team.    10.4 Operating Expenses  We plan to hire all employees as contractors in order to reduce cost. Therefore, we expect the operating  expenses to be low as well. However, this strategy may not guarantee capable personnel to join the team  and deliver satisfying results. If the hiring strategy does not work, we will need to pay higher salaries in  order to obtain higher qualified individuals, which will significantly increase the overall operating  expenses.      10.5 Availability and Timing of Financing   We expect to get $40,000 from friends and family, but we are not confident if we will be able to achieve  this goal by simply presenting the idea without any prototype and demo. Without the $40,000 from  friends and family, we may not have enough funding to operate until the first generation of the prototype  gets completed. The same analogy applies to crowdfunding platform, startup competition awards, as well  as investor loans. We estimate that the minimum funding required will be $160,000 but this is a highly  optimistic estimation and the overall cost may exceed that. We will try to secure the funding as soon as  possible to mitigate this risk.     10.6 Intellectual Property Theft  We do not plan to patent ideas during the development stage, as we plan to gather funds from  crowdfunding platforms instead. This means that we are in the risk of others taking the idea. We will  attempt to obtain a patent for the final design upon product launch.    11.   Offering    11.1 Capital Required  We estimate a funding of $320,000 in total will be needed. Even though the minimum funding we will  require to cover all the expenses prior to when the company begins to generate profit at month 18 equals  $160,000, there are many uncertainties in the business plan. After conducting cost forecasts, we believe  that $320,000 is the target at which capital needs to be raised to ensure sufficient funding for completion  of the product.   
  20. 20. 11.2 Sources of Funds  Initially, we plan to finance the project by withdrawing $30,000 from personal savings and convincing  family and friends to invest $40,000 into the project. We will use Virgin Money US to formalize the  money loaned from family and friends. This $70,000 will allow us to survive 6 months and develop the  first generation prototype. Simultaneously, we will also try to understand the government grants to  discover potential funding. However, failing to obtain government grants will not affect the project, but  the additional funding can expedite the development process and testing. Upon developing the first  prototype by month 3, we will start to pitch the idea at three University of Michigan startup competitions,  including but not limited to: University of Michigan Business Challenge, Accelerate Michigan, and 1000  Pitches. We expect to raise a total $5,000 from the startup competitions. In addition to these competitions,  we will utilize crowdfunding platforms, especially Indiegogo and Kickstarter. We expect to raise $45,000  in total from these platforms. When we finish the second prototype by month 7, we expect to have all the  features in the product and have a completely functional prototype. We will then reach out to discover  potential investors. We will seek out loans to reach a total of $200,000.      11.3 Use of funds  As we can’t guarantee we will raise $320,000 for the project, we decide to cut down all expenses except  for product development. In terms of salary payment, all founders have agreed to only take equity after  the company pays back all investor loans by month 36 and outsource expertise will be hired by contracts.  We expect to hire an experienced hardware engineer at the hourly rate of $35 and an experienced software  developer at the hourly rate of $40. We will also hire 1 attorney prior to opening for legal issues and  patent filing. He/she will be paid on a project­based flat rate no more than $5,000 and will receive an  equal payment between months 1 and 8.    With regards to product development cost, we estimate the total material cost and testing fee for 50 units  of generation 1,2 and 3 prototypes to be $2,000, $1,960, and $4,200, respectively. The first 2 generations  will receive basic feature tests and functionality tests and the third generation of prototype will get  comprehensive tests, such as durability and temperature tests, to qualify for UL certification as consumer  electronics. Also, we don’t plan to spend any money on equipment. We will instead rely on the existing  equipment employees have. The ability to access the required equipment will be included in the contract  of new hires.     Regarding renting, inventory will be stored in the accommodations of the founder’s house before the  storage places are finalized in month 9. Moreover, we plan to conduct all development process and testing  in the founder’s house unless we discover the location will not meet the needs of the required tasks.    In terms of marketing expenses, we plan to start advertising 1 month before the product launch in month  8. We will begin advertising mainly with a word­of­mouth and direct sale marketing strategy. After we  obtain partnerships, we will also incorporate existing advertising strategy used by them. We will not  spend more than $1,000 on advertising before we start to earn profit.      Some miscellaneous expenses include $500 every month on insurance and $100 on all utility expenses.  These utility expenses, such as electricity, water and gas bills, in addition to any additional costs such as  phone bills, etc. will be covered by founders. There will also be a $1,000 expense associated with patent  filing.       
  21. 21. 12. Financial Plan    12.1 Cash Flows Projection  Between months 1 and 8, we will be in the product development stage. Hence, there will be no cash  inflow, but a large number of cash outflows throughout that period of time. We estimate to spend $8,600  on base operating expenses during that period except for months 5 and 8 when we develop the second and  third generation of the prototype and will require outsourcing of additional workforce. We expect to  launch the product at month 9. With a unit price of $35.00, and project to have $2,100 of sales in the first  month. After customer discovery and market research, we believe that the product has a big potential  market and therefore, huge growth opportunity. Using this knowledge, we estimate the sales to increase  by 15% every month between months 9 and 12. The overall operating costs will change accordingly as  well. After product launch, we expect to hire 2 more people and lease an office for business purposes.  Therefore, the operating cost will increase to increase to $12,380. At month 13, we plan to obtain  partnerships with local stores in Ann Arbor, such as Vedder Electric, Turner Electric, and Ashcott  Electrical Inc. and expect an additional 200 units of sales in that month compared with month 12. Each  partner will obtain a $3 profit margin for each unit sold. We will continue looking for partnership  opportunities with retailers and electrical contractors by month 18 with 1,000 additional units sold,  equivalent to $30,000 additional sales (Figure 12). We expect to start generating profit at month 18  (Figure 13) and break even at month 22 (Figure 14).                               Figure 12: 2­year Monthly Revenue Projection                       
  22. 22.         Figure 13: 2­year Monthly Net Profit Projection  Figure 14: 2­year Cumulative Profit     12.2 Payback Plan  We will start to pay back friends and family as well as investors starting at month 22 when we break even.  We will pay 5% of monthly profit to family and friends until the money as well as an additional 10% for  interest.  We will pay 20% of monthly profit to investors until the loans (under all terms agreed upon) are  paid back in full. Afterwards, all investors will receive $1.00 royalties in total for each additional unit sold  in the market.     
  23. 23. Bibliography       "10 Most Valued Internet of Things Startups." ​Hot Topics​. N.p., 02 Feb. 2015. Web. Dec. 2015.     Claudio Munoz, and O'Malley, Lynda. ​The Connected Home: Smart Automation Enables Home Energy  Management​. Rep. MaRS Market Insights, Oct. 2014. Web. Dec. 2015.     Hall, John R., Jr. ​Electrical Fires​. Rep. National Fire Protection Association, Apr. 2013. Web. Dec.  2015.     Haynes, Hylton J.G. ​Fire Loss in the United States During 2014​. Rep. National Fire Protection  Association, Sept. 2015. Web. Dec. 2015.     "Smart Homes Market by Product (Energy Management System, Security & Access Control,  Entertainment Control, and HVAC Control), Protocol and Technology (Protocol, Cellular  Technology, and Communication Technology), Service (Installation, and Customization), and  Geography (North America, Europe, APAC, and ROW) ­ Trend and Forecast to 2020." ​Smart  Homes Market by Product & Technology​. Markets And Markets, Feb. 2015. Web. 12 Dec.  2015. ​Renovation in America​. Rep. N.p.: Houzz, n.d. Print.       "Smartphone Users in the US 2010­2019 | Statistic." ​Statista​. N.p., n.d. Web. Dec. 2015.       "Top 2014 Acquisitions That Advanced the Internet of Things | EE Times." ​EETimes​. N.p., n.d. Web.    Dec. 2015.      "10 Most Valued Internet of Things Startups." ​Hot Topics​. N.p., 02 Feb. 2015. Web. 14 Dec. 2015.   

×