O slideshow foi denunciado.
Utilizamos seu perfil e dados de atividades no LinkedIn para personalizar e exibir anúncios mais relevantes. Altere suas preferências de anúncios quando desejar.

De la stratégie à la gestion de projets dans une entreprise 2.0

1.603 visualizações

Publicada em

Cours donné en DES Management pour ichec entreprises le 5/11/2015

Publicada em: Educação
  • Seja o primeiro a comentar

De la stratégie à la gestion de projets dans une entreprise 2.0

  1. 1. DES MANAGEMENT Entreprise 2.0, Mission, vision, valeurs, stratégie, plan d’actions et gestion de projets  Jacques  Folon   www.folon.com   Partner  Edge  Consulting   Maître  de  conférences     Université  de  Liège     Chargé  de  cours     ICHEC  Brussels  Management  School     Professeur  invité     Université  de  Lorraine  (Metz)   ESC  Rennes  
  2. 2. Cette présentation est disponible sur www.folon.com (conférences) SUIVEZ-MOI SUR LES MEDIA SOCIAUX JACQUES FOLON folon@folon.com GSM: + 32 475 98 21 15
  3. 3. Table des matières 1. Vision globale de l’entreprise au XXème siècle 2. L’entreprise 2.0 3. GénérationY (mythe ou réalité ?) 4. Mission vision valeurs de l’entreprise 5. Stratégie 6. Plan d’actions 7. Gestion de projets
  4. 4. DRH SAV        Produc.on Achats Marke.ng Publicité Vente Sous-­‐ Traitant Producteur  de   Machines Fournisseurs Supply   Chain Web Fournisseurs Soc  de   Service  Push Banque Ac.onnaires linkedin E-­‐learning      Tutoring C     L I E N T S Distributeur Marchand E-­‐biz Sites  d  ’appel   d  ’offre CONCURRENTS Marke.ng   Site  Financier social  media tracking Logis.que CLIENTS Back-­‐up   techniciens Social     media Tutoring Club   u.lisateur Télémaintenance B2B Co-­‐ingienerie Extranet E-­‐GOV Site de crise DG Bureau   d’Etude Maintenance EDI Back-­‐up   commerciaux Partenaires Veille   Concurren.elle  et   Intelligence   Economique $ Ges.on  Trésorerie Dématérialisa.on des  procédures Télémaintenance   machines Veille   Technologique Recherche   nouveaux   Fournisseurs Market-­‐Place Télétravail Ges.on cloud
  5. 5. DRH SAV        Produc.on Achats Marke.ng Publicité Vente Sous-­‐Traitant Producteur  de   Machines Fournisseurs Supply  Chain   Managt            B  to   B Web Fournisseurs Soc  de  Service   Push Banque Ac.onnaires Sites  de   Recrutement E-­‐learning Télé-­‐Tutoring C     L I E N T S DistributeurMarc hand e-­‐ commer ce Sites  d  ’appel   d  ’offre CONCURRENTS Marke.ng   one  to  one Site  Financier e-­‐mailing,  bandeaux, site  promo.onnel... tracking Logis.que CLIENTS Back-­‐up   techniciens SVP  réclama.ons Tutoring Club   u.lisateur Télémaintenance B  to   B Co-­‐ingienerie Extranet administra.ons Site de crise DG Bureau   d’Etude Maintenance EDI Back-­‐up   commerciaux Veille   Concurren.elle  et   Intelligence   Economique $ Ges.on  Trésorerie Dématérialisa.on des  procédures Télémaintenance   machines Veille   Technologique Recherche   nouveaux   Fournisseurs Market-­‐Place Télétravail ASP Ges.on S C M Extranet KM C  R  MINTRANET ERP
  6. 6. Et tout cela ce sont des informations à gérer, contrôler, sauvegarder
  7. 7. Gestion par commande et contrôle SOURCE: www.entrepriseglobale.biz Jean-Yves Huwart

  8. 8. Les informations sont stockées dans des silos
  9. 9. Faible échange d’information SOURCE: www.entrepriseglobale.biz Jean-Yves Huwart

  10. 10. Lourdeur de l’héritage SOURCE: www.entrepriseglobale.biz Jean-Yves Huwart

  11. 11. Employés démotivés
  12. 12. Source: http://fr.slideshare.net/briansolis/official-slideshare-for-whats-the-future-of-business
  13. 13. Table  des  ma.ères 1. Vision  globale  de  l’entreprise   2. L’entreprise  2.0   3. Généra.on  Y  (mythe  ou  réalité  ?)     4. Mission  vision  valeurs  de  l’entreprise   5. Stratégie     6. Plan  d’ac.ons   7. Ges.on  de  projets
  14. 14. L’entreprise  2.0 • Source:  h_p://media.ebaumsworld.com/mediaFiles/picture/793370/80680072.jpg
  15. 15. Defini.on • “Enterprise  2.0  is  the  use  of  emergent   social  so6ware  pla8orms  within   companies  or  between  companies   and  their  partners  and  customers”     – Andrew  McAfee   – Associate  Professor,  Harvard  Business   School   • i.e.    Web  2.0  behind  the  firewall
  16. 16. Meet Charlotte Source: http://www.slideshare.net/TheShed/meet-charlotte
  17. 17. Ms Web2.0 working (as many do) in Enterprise 1.0
  18. 18. She lives here
  19. 19. and works here.
  20. 20. @ home
  21. 21. …one of her hobbies is keeping fit.
  22. 22. @ work
  23. 23. …she’s a research scientist in a large pharmaceutical company.
  24. 24. @ home
  25. 25. …she uses Google to filter the Internet for the information she needs.
  26. 26. @ work
  27. 27. …she has to remember where everything is.
  28. 28. @ home
  29. 29. …she taps the collective knowledge of the internet through Wikipedia.
  30. 30. @ work
  31. 31. …she asks her boss about stuff she needs to know.
  32. 32. @ home
  33. 33. if she misses a radio show or a bit of TV she catches up using…
  34. 34. @ work
  35. 35. …if she misses a meeting she pulls the summary minutes from a document repository. …if the minutes have been captured! …if she knows where they are! …if she has access privileges to them!
  36. 36. @ home
  37. 37. …she keeps in touch with most of her friends on… Her friends are scattered around the world.
  38. 38. @ work
  39. 39. …she networks at a conference once a year.
  40. 40. @ home
  41. 41. …through …she knows what her friends are doing 24/7 wherever they are.
  42. 42. @ work
  43. 43. she doesn’t really understand what the guy two desks down from her does!
  44. 44. @ home
  45. 45. When she’s not catching up with friends she’s using her spare time to catch up on her hobbies.
  46. 46. She has her own blog… where she advertises exercise regime and any hints and tips she comes across.
  47. 47. So far she’s had over 1000 people read her blog from all over the world.
  48. 48. She reads other blogs, is an active forum member and posts frequent ezine articles.
  49. 49. In this online community she’s … a respected leader …and a dedicated follower.
  50. 50. When she got interested in keeping fit her network was…
  51. 51. now it’s…
  52. 52. @ work
  53. 53. …her network is still…
  54. 54. …If you ask Charlotte what she wants to change at work she’ll say…
  55. 55. …she want’s to connect with anybody…
  56. 56. …at anytime…
  57. 57. …from anywhere!
  58. 58. So Entreprise 2.0 or employees 2.0 in old-fashionned companies?
  59. 59. LE MONDE A CHANGE DEPUIS l’AN 2000 !!!
  60. 60. Le monde change vite ! De quand date l’invention de: World Wide Web 1990 Iphone 2007 Facebook Accessible au public en 2006 Ipad 2010
  61. 61. The Shift Source: David Hachez, the after http://fr.slideshare.net/theafter
  62. 62. Source: http://fr.slideshare.net/infe/web-20-business-models-270855
  63. 63. SOURCE: http://fr.slideshare.net/bradfrostweb/for-a-futurefriendly-web-mobilism-2012
  64. 64. SOURCE: http://fr.slideshare.net/bradfrostweb/for-a-futurefriendly-web-mobilism-2012
  65. 65. SOURCE DE L’IMAGE: http://www.jeffbullas.com/2012/08/07/15-common-mistakes-in-social-media-marketing/
  66. 66. 75
  67. 67. 76
  68. 68. http://dstevenwhite.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Social-Media-Growth-2006-to-2012.jpg 6 jaren ! 6 ans !
  69. 69. http://fr.slideshare.net/ayeletb/preparing-for-the-future-the-power-of-relationships STOP READING MY BOOK !
  70. 70. MOBILITE Source: http://www.securedgenetworks.com/secure-edge-networks-blog/?Tag=mobile%20device%20management%20in%20education
  71. 71. Source: http://mapplelien.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/one-billion-apps-hero-20090418.png D’innombrables applications accessibles online
  72. 72. UNE ENTREPRISE EN 2015 SOURCE  :  UWE  |  5  juin  2013|  @awtbe  |  André  Blavier  &  Pascal  Poty
  73. 73. V A T I C A N
  74. 74. Source:  Gepng  Real  About  Enterprise  2.00  200  Picture  credit:  www.cs4fn.orgOscar  Berg  &  Henrik  Gustafsson,  Acando
  75. 75. People • The  Strength  of  Weak  Ties   • Weak  .es  are  those  people   in  our  social  networks  that   we  have  linked  to  or  have   met  at  a  conference  and   exchanged  business  cards   with  -­‐  the  people  that  are   on  our  radar  as  poten.al   colleagues  or  poten.al   business  partners.
  76. 76. The  New  Enterprise
 Structure   Scope   Resource  Focus   State   Personnel/focus   Key  drivers   DirecQon   Basis  of  acQon   Individual  moQvaQon   Learning   Basis  for  compensaQon   RelaQonships   Employee  aRtude   Dominant  requirements Hierarchical Internal/closed Capital Static, stable Managers Reward and punishment Management commands Control Satisfy superiors Specific skills Position in hierarchy Competitive (my turf) Detachment (it’s a job) Sound Management Closed Hierarchy Networked External/open Human, information Dynamic, changing Professionals Commitment Self-management Empowerment to act Achieve team goals Broader competencies Accomplishment, competence level Cooperative (our challenge) Identification (its’ my company) Leadership Open Networked Enterprise Source: Paradigm Shift: The New Promise of Information Technology, 1992
  77. 77. Source:  Gepng  Real  About  Enterprise  2.00  200  Picture  credit:  www.cs4fn.orgOscar  Berg  &  Henrik  Gustafsson,  Acando
  78. 78. Source:  Gepng  Real  About  Enterprise  2.00  200  Picture  credit:  www.cs4fn.orgOscar  Berg  &  Henrik  Gustafsson,  Acando
  79. 79. Table  des  ma.ères 1. Vision  globale  de  l’entreprise   2. L’entreprise  2.0   3. GénéraQon  Y  (mythe  ou  réalité  ?)     4. Mission  vision  valeurs  de  l’entreprise   5. Stratégie     6. Plan  d’ac.ons   7. Ges.on  de  projets
  80. 80. 
 Génération  Y  mythe  ou  réalité  ?
  81. 81. The myth of Génération Y http://sandstormdigital.com/2012/11/08/understanding-digital-natives/
  82. 82. Comment  les   désigner  ? Babyboomer’s childrens Echo-boomers E-Generation Digital Natives Facebook Generation Gen Y Génération 2001 Génération accélération Génération des transparents Génération entropique Génération Internet Génération Moi Génération texto/SMS Génération WWW Generation Y not? Génération Zapping Great Generation Homo Zappiens i-Generation Millenials Net Generation Nexters Nintendo Generation Nouveaux androïdes Sunshine Generationhttp://www.zazzle.be/generation_y_pas_tshirt-­‐235332731462770922
  83. 83. Quand  faut-­‐il  être  né  pour  en  faire  partie? La période pour définir cette génération Y est très variable, elle comprend (selon les auteurs) les personnes nées: •Entre 1974 et 1994 •De 1978 à 1998 (pour ceux qui les caractérisent d’Echo-boomer) •De 1978 à 1988 •Ou de 1978 à 1995 •Ceux qui sont nés après 1980 •Entre 1980 et 2000 •Ou après 1982 •ou plus précisément de 1982 à 2003 •Entre 1990 et 2000 •... BARRER LA MENTION INUTILE ! http://funnyscrapcodes.blogspot.com/2009/10/embed-­‐code-­‐funny-­‐stuff-­‐funny-­‐scraps.html
  84. 84. Un  concept  défini   de  façon  aussi   variable  et   contradictoire   existe-­‐t-­‐il? http://www.madmoizelle.com/generation-y-temoignage-43730
  85. 85. Wri.ng  in  the  Bri<sh  Journal  of  Educa<on   Technology  in  2008,     a  group  of  academics  led  by  Sue  BenneC  of  the   University  of  Wollongong  set  out  to  debunk  the   whole  idea  of  digital  na<ves,    arguing  that  there  may  be  “as  much  varia0on   within  the  digital  na0ve  genera0on  as  between   the  genera0ons”.  
  86. 86. • Michael  Wesch,  who  pioneered  the  use  of  new  media  in  his   cultural  anthropology  classes  at  Kansas  State  University,  is  also   scep.cal,  saying  that  many  of  his  incoming  students  have  only   a  superficial  familiarity  with  the  digital  tools  that  they  use   regularly,  especially  when  it  comes  to  the  tools’  social  and   poli.cal  poten.al.     • Only  a  small  fracQon  of  students  may  count  as  true  digital   naQves,  in  other  words.  The  rest  are  no  be]er  or  worse  at   using  technology  than  the  rest  of  the  populaQon.   

  87. 87. Ils  ne  sont  pas  si  fort  que  ça!
  88. 88. Table  des  ma.ères 1. Vision  globale  de  l’entreprise   2. L’entreprise  2.0   3. Généra.on  Y  (mythe  ou  réalité  ?)     4. Mission  vision  valeurs  de  l’entreprise   5. Stratégie     6. Plan  d’ac.ons   7. Ges.on  de  projets
  89. 89. Des  valeurs  au  plan  d’ac.on Valeurs Vision Mission Stratégie Plan d’actions
  90. 90. Les  valeurs
  91. 91. Les  valeurs http://www.valeurscorporate.f ET LA SECURITE ????
  92. 92. Quatre valeurs fédératrices
 Les valeurs clés d’une entreprise constituent le terreau de sa culture. Elles guident l'entreprise et fournissent, à un groupe multidimensionnel, un socle culturel commun. Leur objectif est d'orienter le comportement et les actions des collaborateurs de la banque. BNP Paribas s’est choisi quatre valeurs clés dont il rappelle régulièrement l’importance, notamment lors de l’évaluation annuelle à laquelle sont soumis les collaborateurs pour mesurer leur performance en termes de réactivité, de créativité, d’engagement et d’ambition.   ■ Réactivité
 Être rapide dans l’évaluation des situations et des évolutions comme dans l’identification des opportunités et des risques.
 Être efficace dans la prise de décision et dans l’action.   ■ Créativité
 Promouvoir les initiatives et les idées nouvelles.
 Distinguer les auteurs pour leur créativité.   ■ Engagement
 S’impliquer au service des clients et de la réussite collective.
 Être exemplaire dans ses comportements.   ■ Ambition
 Goût du challenge et du leadership.
 Volonté de gagner en équipe une compétition dont l’arbitre est le client. 80
  93. 93. Nos valeurs Cette mission s’adosse aux valeurs constitutives de l’identité de notre entreprise : La passion et l’ambition de mener à bien de grands défis
 Tout autant qu’il y a trente ans, quand un tout jeune Bill Gates annonçait le pari fou d’un ordinateur sur chaque bureau et dans chaque foyer, nous sommes convaincus des possibilités inouïes offertes par les technologies numériques et souhaitons mettre ces outils au service du plus grand nombre et au service de chaque besoin particulier. L’intégrité et la responsabilité
 Notre position de leader exige de nous une conduite exemplaire dans nos pratiques de travail quotidiennes et nos relations avec l’ensemble de nos interlocuteurs. Le respect et la remise en question
 Cela passe avant tout par l’écoute de nos clients, de nos partenaires, des autres acteurs de l’industrie, de nos interlocuteurs politiques et institutionnels. C’est également le respect de la diversité qui fait la richesse de notre entreprise et qui permet, constamment, d’élargir notre univers et d’apprendre des autres.
  94. 94. EsQme Service Faire  la  différence Cohésion  interne TransformaQon RelaQons Survie Physique EmoQonnel Mental Spirituel 4 1 2 3 5 6 7 Les  7  niveaux  de  conscience  de  Barre_ Source: The Seven Levels of Non-Governmental (NGO) Consciousness, Richard Barrett, Barrett Values Centre http://fr.slideshare.net/SocialBusinessModels/i-have-a-dream-and-values
  95. 95. EsQme Service Faire  la  différence Cohésion  interne TransformaQon RelaQons Survie 4 1 2 3 5 6 7 Focus:  bases  pour  la  survie Personnel Santé Stabilité  financière Sécurité  du  travail OrganisaQonnel Autofinancement Santé  financière Santé  /  sécurité  des  employés Communauté Stabilité  économique Prospérité Sécurité Source: The Seven Levels of Non-Governmental (NGO) Consciousness, Richard Barrett, Barrett Values Centre http://fr.slideshare.net/SocialBusinessModels/i-have-a-dream-and-values
  96. 96. EsQme Service Faire  la  différence Cohésion  interne TransformaQon RelaQons Survie 4 1 2 3 5 6 7 Focus:  rela.ons  et  connec.vité Personnel Famille Ami.és Réseaux OrganisaQonnel Sa.sfac.on  du  client Communica.on  ouverte Respect  d’autrui Communauté Résolu.on  des  conflits Harmonie  raciale Respect  des  tradi.ons Source: The Seven Levels of Non-Governmental (NGO) Consciousness, Richard Barrett, Barrett Values Centre http://fr.slideshare.net/SocialBusinessModels/i-have-a-dream-and-values
  97. 97. EsQme Service Faire  la  différence Cohésion  interne TransformaQon RelaQons Survie 4 1 2 3 5 6 7 Focus:  es.me  de  soi  et  performance Personnel Confiance  en  soi Succès Appartenance  sociale OrganisaQonnel Efficience,  économicité Produc.vité Efficacité,  qualité,  labels Communauté Autorité  de  la  loi Infrastructures  fiables Efficacité  du  gouvernement Source: The Seven Levels of Non-Governmental (NGO) Consciousness, Richard Barrett, Barrett Values Centre http://fr.slideshare.net/SocialBusinessModels/i-have-a-dream-and-values
  98. 98. EsQme Service Faire  la  différence Cohésion  interne RelaQons Survie 1 2 3 5 6 7 Focus:  appren.ssage  et  améliora.on  con.nue TransformaQon 4 Personnel Courage Croissance  personnelle Equilibre  du  travail  et  de  la  vie  privée. OrganisaQonnel Innova.on Diversité Travail  d’équipe Communauté Egalité Liberté  d’expression Adaptabilité Source: The Seven Levels of Non-Governmental (NGO) Consciousness, Richard Barrett, Barrett Values Centre http://fr.slideshare.net/SocialBusinessModels/i-have-a-dream-and-values
  99. 99. EsQme Service Faire  la  différence Cohésion  interne TransformaQon RelaQons Survie 4 1 2 3 5 6 7 Focus:  alignement  et  authen.cité Personnel Confiance Enthousiasme Créa.vité OrganisaQonnel Intégrité Coopéra.on Vision  partagée Communauté Dialogue Transparence Capacité  d’ac.on  collec.ve Source: The Seven Levels of Non-Governmental (NGO) Consciousness, Richard Barrett, Barrett Values Centre http://fr.slideshare.net/SocialBusinessModels/i-have-a-dream-and-values
  100. 100. EsQme Service Faire  la  différence Cohésion  interne TransformaQon RelaQons Survie 4 1 2 3 5 6 7 Focus:  collabora.on,  alliances  et  partenariats Personnel Coaching Mentoring Bénévolat OrganisaQonnel Accomplissement  des  employés Sensibilisa.on  à  l'environnement Alliances  stratégiques Communauté Qualité  de  vie Alliances  mutuellement  bénéfiques Ges.on  par.cipa.ve Source: The Seven Levels of Non-Governmental (NGO) Consciousness, Richard Barrett, Barrett Values Centre http://fr.slideshare.net/SocialBusinessModels/i-have-a-dream-and-values
  101. 101. EsQme Service Faire  la  différence Cohésion  interne TransformaQon RelaQons Survie 4 1 2 3 5 6 7 Focus:  service  désintéressé,  bénévolat,  don  de  soi Personnel Sagesse Humilité Compassion OrganisaQonnel Ethique Responsabilité  sociétale Vision  à  long  terme Communauté Jus.ce  sociale Développement  durable Préoccupa.on  avec  les  généra.ons   futures Source: The Seven Levels of Non-Governmental (NGO) Consciousness, Richard Barrett, Barrett Values Centre http://fr.slideshare.net/SocialBusinessModels/i-have-a-dream-and-values
  102. 102. Il  n’y  a  plus  qu’à  choisir  celles  qui  comptent  pour  vous  et   vérifier  si  elles  correspondent  à  celles  de  votre  employeur http://fr.slideshare.net/SocialBusinessModels/i-have-a-dream-and-values
  103. 103. Mission,  Vision ★ Une définition possible de la mission d'entreprise est "la définition de sa raison d'être, l'aspiration suprême qu'elle tente continuellement d'atteindre". L'énoncé de cette mission est en général une phrase ou un paragraphe qui formule cette raison d'être sous une forme un peu vague mais durable et qui est donc un repère stable dans le changement quotidien.   ★ En   contraste   avec   une   mission,   une   "vision"   sert   à   décrire   un   état  futur  désiré.     ★ L’énoncé   de   la   mission   doit   donc   être   précis   et   ayant   une   validité  déterminée  dans  le  temps.  La  vision  peut-­‐être  amenée  à   être  changée  pour  s'adapter  aux  circonstances  conjoncturelles   et  internes  alors  que  la  mission,  elle,  reste  idenQque.. J.Tendon, http://www.systemic.ch/NewArticles/article008.htm
  104. 104. Mission,  vision,  valeurs elles  sont  généralement  publiques 83
  105. 105. Mission Peter Drucker observait déjà en 1973 que "la plus importante raison de frustration et d'échecs dans les entreprises provient d'une réflexion insuffisante de la raison d'être de l'entreprise, de s a m i s s i o n " . C e t t e réflexion est toujours d'actualité.
  106. 106. La mission de Microsoft est de mettre son expertise, sa capacité d’innovation et la passion qui l'anime au service des projets, des ambitions et de la créativité de ses clients, afin de faire de la technologie leur meilleure alliée dans l’expression de leur potentiel.
  107. 107. Google a pour mission d'organiser les informations à l'échelle mondiale dans le but de les rendre accessibles et utiles à tous
  108. 108. Table  des  ma.ères1. Vision  globale  de  l’entreprise   2. L’entreprise  2.0   3. Généra.on  Y  (mythe  ou  réalité  ?)     4. Mission  vision  valeurs  de  l’entreprise   5. Stratégie     6. Plan  d’ac.ons   7. Ges.on  de  projets
  109. 109. La  stratégie Source: http://davidcoethica.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/strategy.jpg LLa stratégie d'entreprise est une question d'adéquation entre les capacités internes d'une entreprise et son environnement extérieur. Bien que les experts en stratégie divergent sur le fond, ils s'accordent à penser que cette affirmation constitue une des problématiques majeures.
  110. 110. Une définition ? La détermination des orientations à long terme de l'entreprise et l'adoption des actions consécutives, y compris l'allocation des ressources nécessaires à la réalisation de ces objectifs. Chandler
  111. 111. La  stratégie   • Simple   • Compréhensible   • U.lisée  au  quo.dien   • But  à  a_eindre   • Long  terme  (3  à  4  ans)
  112. 112. Source: elhambinai.blogspot.com/ 2008/02/stay-focused.htm
  113. 113. Stratégie  et  focus BUT ? ?? ? ? ?
  114. 114. Important  et  urgent URGENT PAS URGENT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT ET URGENT IMPORTANT ET PAS URGENT PAS IMPORTANT URGENT ET PAS IMPORTANT PAS URGENT ET PAS IMPORTANT
  115. 115. Il n’y a pas de chemin pour celui qui ne sait où il va ! Proverbe japonais
  116. 116. Diagnostic Formulation Exécution Learned, Christensen, Andrews, Guth - 1969 - Le modèle de Harvard (LCAG)
  117. 117. LCAG inventent SWOT!
  118. 118. Analyse  stratégique
  119. 119. S TWO
  120. 120. S T W O Positive Negative
  121. 121. S T W O InternalExternal
  122. 122. ANALYSE  SWOT Source: Merkapt - http://www.slideshare.net/merkapt/stratgie-dentreprise-pratique
  123. 123. Source: Merkapt - http://www.slideshare.net/merkapt/stratgie-dentreprise-pratique
  124. 124. Source: Merkapt - http://www.slideshare.net/merkapt/stratgie-dentreprise-pratique
  125. 125. http://www.slideshare.net/merkapt/stratgie-dentreprise-pratique
  126. 126. Modèle  général  d’Andrews  et  valeurs Analyse de l’environnement Identifier les objectifs stratégiques Analyse des ressources SWOT Stratégies alternatives Valeurs de la direction Décisions stratégiques Responsabilité sociale Objectifs stratégiques et politique générale révisés http://www.slideshare.net/Omar.Filali/management-stratgique-et-culture-dentreprise
  127. 127. Leadership  plan  d’ac.ons  et  culture   d’entreprise
  128. 128. Stratégie Plan d’actions ANALYSE SWOT
  129. 129. SKILLS STAFF SHARED VALUES STRATEGY STRUCTURE STYLE SYSTEMS Seven S Model of Implementation
  130. 130. Seven S Model 1. Strategy – Plan or course of action leading to the allocation of firm’s resources to reach identified goals. 2. Structure – The ways people and tasks relate to each other.The basic grouping of reporting relationships and activities.The way separate entities of an organization are linked. 3. Shared Values – The significant meanings or guiding concepts that give purpose and meaning to the organization. 4. Systems – Formal processes and procedures, including management control systems, performance measurement and reward systems, and planning and budgeting systems, and the ways people relate to them. 5. Skills – Organizational competencies, including the abilities of individuals as well as management practices, technological abilities, and other capabilities that reside in the organization. 6. Style – The leadership style of management and the overall operating style of the organization.A reflection of the norms people act upon and how they work and interact with each other, vendors, and customers. 7. Staff – Recruitment, selection, development, socialization, and advancement of people in the organization.
  131. 131. Corporate Strategy Stratégie de groupe Portefeuille d’activités Maximiser la VALEUR Business Strategy Stratégie concurrentielle BU / Firmes Maximiser la PERFORMANCE Stratégies de croissance Stratégies de désengagement interne externe Domination Par les prix Différenciation abandon Externalisation Partenariat M. Porter
  132. 132. Table des matières 1. Vision globale de l’entreprise 2. L’entreprise 2.0 3. GénérationY (mythe ou réalité ?) 4. Mission vision valeurs de l’entreprise 5. Stratégie 6. Plan d’actions 7. Gestion de projets
  133. 133. • Comment? • Quoi? • Qui? • Combien? • Où? • Quand? • Pourquoi? tttt PLAN D’ACTIONS
  134. 134. Plan d’actions
  135. 135. 116
  136. 136. Table  des  ma.ères 1. Vision  globale  de  l’entreprise   2. L’entreprise  2.0   3. Généra.on  Y  (mythe  ou  réalité  ?)     4. Mission  vision  valeurs  de  l’entreprise   5. Stratégie     6. Plan  d’ac.ons   7. GesQon  de  projets
  137. 137. And now … Project management
  138. 138. Project management: 1. Preliminary facts & questions 2. The Golden rule (& triangle) 3. The objectives 4. The planning 5. The context of the company 6. The team 7. The stakeholders 8. Contractual relations 9. Conflicts
  139. 139. La  ges.on  de  projets…
  140. 140. DEUX  ELEMENTS  CLES
  141. 141. h_p://www.slideshare.net/trib
  142. 142. The  ques.ons  one  MUST  ask  before   star.ng  any  project Why What How When Who Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  143. 143. Why   What   How   When   Who Why is this project happening? Why now? Why us? Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  144. 144. Why   What   How   When   Who What solution needs to be put in place to achieve the goals? What work needs to happen to build the solution? Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  145. 145. Why   What   How   When   Who How do we get this solution in place? How do we know when we’re done? Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  146. 146. Why   What   How   When   Who When do work activities happen? What do we need to do first? What’s last? Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  147. 147. Why   What   How   When   Who Who do we need to deliver this project successfully? ? Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  148. 148. And what will it cost? $
  149. 149. Source:  Gepng  Real  About  Enterprise  2.00  200  Picture  credit:  www.cs4fn.orgOscar  Berg  &  Henrik  Gustafsson,  Acando
  150. 150. Project management: 1. Preliminary facts & questions 2. The Golden rule (& triangle) 3. The objectives 4. The planning 5. The context of the company 6. The team 7. The stakeholders 8. Contractual relations 9. Conflicts
  151. 151. The  golden  rule  !!! • The  triple  constraint     • Also  known  as  the  IRON  TRIANGLE   • IT  MUST  BE  DEFINED  BEFOREHAND  ! Time Scope Cost
  152. 152. Quality The  Quadruple  Constraint • Warning:  Quality  has  many  definiQons Time Scope Cost
  153. 153. Figure 1.1 Triple Constraint of Project Management
 (Schwalbe, 2006, p8)
  154. 154. Project  management  body  of  knowledge   Integration Management Time Management Cost Management Scope Management Quality Management HR Management Risk Management Communication Management Procurement Management
  155. 155. Project management: 1. Preliminary facts & questions 2. The Golden rule (& triangle) 3. The objectives 4. The planning 5. The context of the company 6. The team 7. The stakeholders 8. Contractual relations 9. Conflicts
  156. 156. S Specific M Measurable A Achievable R Relevant T Time-bound OBJECTIVES MUST BE SMART !
  157. 157. Letter Major Term Minor Terms S Specific Significant[3], Stretching[3], Simple M Measurable Meaningful[3], Motivational[3], Manageable A Achievable Agreed, Attainable[6], Assignable[2], Appropriate, Actionable, Action-oriented[3] R Relevant Realistic[2], Results/Results-focused/Results-oriented[6], Resourced[7], Rewarding[3] T Time-bound Time framed[2], Timed, Time-based, Timeboxed, Timely[6][5], Timebound, Time-Specific, Timetabled, Trackable E[1] Exciting, Evaluated, Ethical R[1] Recorded, Rewarding, Reviewed[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMART_(project_management) EVEN SMARTER…
  158. 158. Project management: 1. Preliminary facts & questions 2. The Golden rule (& triangle) 3. The objectives 4. The planning 5. The context of the company 6. The team 7. The stakeholders 8. Contractual relations 9. Conflicts
  159. 159. http://flickr.com/photos/xabier-martinez/225627841/ The planning … Are you sure it’s needed? Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  160. 160. http://flickr.com/photos/xabier-martinez/225627841/ The PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe Plan Changes once you start
  161. 161. http://flickr.com/photos/xabier-martinez/225627841/ The PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe Plan Changes once you start Guides you activities
  162. 162. http://flickr.com/photos/xabier-martinez/225627841/ The PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe Plan Changes once you start Guides you activities Makes you think ahead
  163. 163. http://flickr.com/photos/xabier-martinez/225627841/ The PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe Plan Changes once you start Guides you activities Makes you think ahead Helps you work out who you need to hire
  164. 164. http://flickr.com/photos/xabier-martinez/225627841/ The PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe Plan Changes once you start Guides you activities Makes you think ahead Helps you work out who you need to hire Works out the timeline and budget
  165. 165. http://flickr.com/photos/xabier-martinez/225627841/ The PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe Plan Changes once you start Guides you activities Makes you think ahead Helps you work out who you need to hire Helps manage expectations Works out the timeline and budget
  166. 166. http://flickr.com/photos/xabier-martinez/225627841/ The PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe Plan Changes once you start Guides you activities Makes you think ahead Helps you work out who you need to hire Helps manage expectations Works out the timeline and budget Helps understand the effects of changes
  167. 167. http://flickr.com/photos/xabier-martinez/225627841/ The PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe PlanThe Plan Changes once you start Guides you activities Makes you think ahead Helps you work out who you need to hire Helps manage expectations Don’t forget the retroplanning Works out the timeline and budget Helps understand the effects of changes
  168. 168. Project management: 1. Preliminary facts & questions 2. The Golden rule (& triangle) 3. The objectives 4. The planning 5. The context of the company 6. The team 7. The stakeholders 8. Contractual relations 9. Conflicts
  169. 169. Integration Management Time Management Cost Management Scope Management Quality Management HR Management Risk Management Communication Management Procurement Management
  170. 170. What  if  it’s  not  Integrated? Integration Management Time Management Cost Management Scope Management Quality Management HR Management Risk Management Communication Management Procurement Management
  171. 171. Project management: 1. Preliminary facts & questions 2. The Golden rule (& triangle) 3. The objectives 4. The planning 5. The context of the company 6. The team 7. The stakeholders 8. Contractual relations 9. Conflicts
  172. 172. • Which  ones  are  most  important  for  projects? Technical skills People Skills Budgeting, Scheduling, Documenting Leading, Motivating, Listening, Empathising Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  173. 173. Figure 1.3 Technical and Sociocultural Dimensions of Project Management
 (Gray & Larson, 2006, p13)
  174. 174. • A  team     • is  a  group  of  individuals  who  cooperate  and  work  together  to  achieve  a  given  set  of   objec.ves  or  goals  (Horodyski,  1995).
  175. 175. • Team-­‐building   •  is  high  interac.on  among  group  members  to  increase  trust  and  openness
  176. 176. • Project  Team  Size   • Performance  is  based  on  balance  of  members  carrying  out  roles  and  mee.ng  social  and   emo.onal  needs
  177. 177. • Project  teams  of  5  to  12  members  work  best Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  178. 178. • There  are  problems   you  encounter  as   size  increases Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  179. 179. It  gets  more  difficult  to   interact  with  and   influence  the  group   Individuals  get  less   saQsfacQon  from  their   involvement  in  the  team   People  end  up  with  less   commitment  to  the  team   goals   It  requires  more   centralized  decision   making     There  is  lesser  feeling  as   being  part  of  team Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  180. 180. • You  can’t  accelerate  a  nine-­‐month  pregnancy  by  hiring  nine  pregnant  women  for  a   month.     • Likewise,  says  University  of  North  Carolina  computer  scien.st  Fred  Brooks,  you  can’t   always  speed  up  an  overdue  so}ware  project  by  adding  more  programmers;     • Beyond  a  certain  point,  doing  so  increases  delays.  
  181. 181. Assigning more programmers to a project running behind schedule will make it even later, due to the time required for the new programmers to learn about the project, as well as the increased communication overhead. - Fred Brooks
  182. 182. Fred Brooks The Mythical Man-Month Group Intercommunication Formula n(n − 1) / 2 Examples Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  183. 183. Fred Brooks The Mythical Man-Month Group Intercommunication Formula n(n − 1) / 2 Examples 5 developers -> 5(5 − 1) / 2 = 10 channels of communication Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  184. 184. Fred Brooks The Mythical Man-Month Group Intercommunication Formula n(n − 1) / 2 Examples 5 developers -> 5(5 − 1) / 2 = 10 channels of communication 10 developers -> 10(10 − 1) / 2 = 45 channels of communication Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  185. 185. Fred Brooks The Mythical Man-Month Group Intercommunication Formula n(n − 1) / 2 Examples 5 developers -> 5(5 − 1) / 2 = 10 channels of communication 10 developers -> 10(10 − 1) / 2 = 45 channels of communication 50 developers -> 50(50 − 1) / 2 = 1225 channels of communication Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  186. 186. Project implies change ! And as such Resistance to change, even within the project team !
  187. 187. http://flickr.com/photos/hlthenvt/401556761/sizes/l/
  188. 188. Project management: 1. Preliminary facts & questions 2. The Golden rule (& triangle) 3. The objectives 4. The planning 5. The context of the company 6. The team 7. The stakeholders 8. Contractual relations 9. Conflicts
  189. 189. http://www.betterprojects.net/2007/05/introduction-to-stakeholder-management.html
  190. 190. Figure 10.1 Network of stakeholders
 (Gray & Larson, 2006, p314)
  191. 191. Project  team  manages  and  completes  the  project  work.  Most  par.cipants  want  to  do  a   good  job,  but  they  are  also  concerned  with  other  obliga.ons  and  how  their   involvement  will  contribute  to  their  personal  goals  and  aspira.ons
  192. 192. Project  managers  naturally  compete  with  each  other  for   resources  and  support  from  top  management.     At  the  same  .me,  they  have  to  share  resources  and  exchange  
  193. 193. FuncQonal  managers  depending  upon  how  the  project  is   organised  can  play  minor  or  major  role  toward  the  project   success,  for  example  providing  technical  input  etc.
  194. 194. Top  management  approves  funding  of  the  project  and  establishes  the   priori.es  within  the  organiza.on.  They  define  success,  rewards  for  the   successful  comple.ng  of  the  project.  Significant  adjustments  in  scope,   .me  and  cost
  195. 195. Project  sponsors  champion  of  the  project  and  use   their  influence  to  gain  approval  of  the  project.  Their   reputa.on  is  .ed  to  the  success  of  the  project  
  196. 196. Customers  define  the  scope  of  the  project,  and  ul.mate  project  success   rests  in  their  sa.sfac.on.  Project  managers  need  to  be  responsive  to   changing  customer  needs  and  requirements  and  to  mee.ng  their   expecta.ons
  197. 197. AdministraQve  groups  such  as  human  resources,  informa.on   systems,  purchasing  agents,  maintenance  etc.  provide   valuable  support  service.
  198. 198. Government  agencies  place  constrains  on  project  work.   Permits  need  to  be  secured
  199. 199. Contractors  may  do  the  actual  work  with  team   members  
  200. 200. Project management: 1. Preliminary facts & questions 2. The Golden rule (& triangle) 3. The objectives 4. The planning 5. The context of the company 6. The team 7. The stakeholders 8. Contractual relations 9. Conflicts
  201. 201. Types  of  Contracts
  202. 202. Types  of  Contracts Fixed Price Cost Plus
  203. 203. Types  of  Contracts Fixed Price Cost Plus AKA Lump Sum AKA Time and Materials
  204. 204. Types  of  Contracts Fixed Price The contractor lowest bid agrees to perform all work specified in the contract at a fixed price. Disadvantages • More difficult and more costly to prepare (for client) • The risk of underestimating project costs (for contractor) Contract adjustments • Re-determination provisions • Performance incentives
  205. 205. Types  of  Contracts Cost Plus Contractor is reimbursed for all direct allowable costs (materials, labor, travel) plus prior-negotiated fee (set as a percentage of the total costs) to cover overhead and profit. Risk to client is in relying on the contractor’s best efforts to contain costs Controls on contractors • performance and schedule incentives • costs-sharing clauses
  206. 206. Project management: 1. Preliminary facts & questions 2. The Golden rule (& triangle) 3. The objectives 4. The planning 5. The context of the company 6. The team 7. The stakeholders 8. Contractual relations 9. Conflicts
  207. 207. It’s not as easy as it sounds Source: Craig Brown www.betterproject.net
  208. 208. Ges.on  de  projets Phase  «  PLAN  »  :  dire  ce  que  l’on  va  faire  dans  un  domaine  par.culier.   Phase  «  DO  »  :  faire  ce  que  l’on  a  dit  dans  ce  domaine.   Phase  «  CHECK  »  :  vérifier  qu’il  n’y  a  pas  d’écart  entre  ce  que  l’on  a  dit  et  ce  que  l’on  a  fait.   Phase  «  ACT  »  :  entreprendre  des  ac.ons  correc.ves  pour  régler  tout  écart  qui  aurait  été  constaté   précédemment.
  209. 209. Project management: Conclusions
  210. 210. La gestion de projet est une démarche visant à structurer, assurer et optimiser le bon déroulement d'un projet qui doit être: 1. planifié 2. budgété (étude préalable des coûts et avantages ou revenus attendus en contrepartie, des sources de financement, étude des risques opérationnels et financiers et des impacts divers...) 3. Géré et organisé afin de maîtriser et piloter les risques 4. atteindre le niveau de qualité souhaité 5. faire intervenir et coordonner plusieur intervenants 6. Être géré par un comité de pilotage et/ou un chef de projet Gestion de projets
  211. 211. Figure 1.1 Project Life Cycle 
 (Gray & Larson, 2006, p6)
  212. 212. NEVER  FORGET  THAT  PROJECT   MANAGEMENT  IS  A  BALANCE  BETWEEN   SCOPE TIME COST QUALITY
  213. 213. UN PROJET N’EST PAS UNE FIN EN SOI…
  214. 214. QUESTIONS ?

×