O slideshow foi denunciado.
Seu SlideShare está sendo baixado. ×

MIT's Big Oil Connection

Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
MIT
MIT
Corporation
MIT Faculty MIT GSU
Built by MIT
Charles Harvey
MIT Professor, Carbon Capture Expert
Lone voice speaking out against carbon
capture.
2
How is MIT broken? L...
“…MIT hopes through [Skoltech] to
help plant the seeds of an innovation
ecosystem in Russia that will benefit
the particip...
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Próximos SlideShares
Tricolor pdf 750-400.pdf
Tricolor pdf 750-400.pdf
Carregando em…3
×

Confira estes a seguir

1 de 85 Anúncio

Mais Conteúdo rRelacionado

Mais recentes (20)

Anúncio

MIT's Big Oil Connection

  1. 1. MIT MIT Corporation MIT Faculty MIT GSU Built by MIT
  2. 2. Charles Harvey MIT Professor, Carbon Capture Expert Lone voice speaking out against carbon capture. 2 How is MIT broken? Let me count the ways.
  3. 3. “…MIT hopes through [Skoltech] to help plant the seeds of an innovation ecosystem in Russia that will benefit the participating institutions—and the rest of the world.” — Rafael Reif — A decade of lying to MIT students 4 How is MIT broken? Let me count the ways.
  4. 4. 2012 APRIL Maria Zuber appointed by Schlumberger director Rafael Reif to sabotage MIT Climate Action Plan. 2012 NOVEMBER Zuber publishes “Solutions” plan, eliminating all references to climate change and fossil fuels. 2021 JANUARY Zuber and Kerry bring “All of the Above” climate action plan to Biden White House. Ed Carlevale | LinkedIn | July 26, 2022
  5. 5. How can you judge the cruelty of an Environmental Research Plan? Read the plan that it replaced.
  6. 6. YEAR CASH STOCKS COMPENSATION 2007 $52,500 $147,660 $200,160 2008 $97,500 $201,100 $298,600 2009 $120,000 $110,228 $241,793 2010 $120,000 $160,695 $280,695 2011 $127,500 $197,528 $325,028 2012 $130,000 $166,815 $296,815 2013 $130,000 $167,468 $297,468 2014 $130,000 $228,488 $376,280 2015 $130,000 $212,873 $355,879 2016 $137,500 $178,650 $316,150 2017 $137,500 $178,650 $280,695 2018 $158,700 $189,980 $325,028 2019 $155,000 $184,180 $357,265 2020 $116,250 $177,912 $294,162 2021 $116,250 $177,912 $294,162 Total $1,858,700 $2,680,139 $4,540,180 Reif earned $4.5 million in the 15 years that he served as a Schlumberger director. New rule. If a fossil fuel company pays you $4.5 million, you are a fossil fuel employee.
  7. 7. New York Times Op-Ed Too Little, Too Late How MIT became a for-profit Corporation serving the fossil fuel industry. Report to the FBI — Ed Carlevale — May 31, 2022
  8. 8. You will never understand the cruelty of MIT’s environmental initiative until you understand what was removed. Every safeguard for the most vulnerable people on the planet was deleted. You come face-to-face with first world evil when you truly understand the before and after, and the silence of those who know the significance of what was removed.
  9. 9. Frontline’s 3-part documentary, “The Power of Big Oil,” clearly shows Moniz lying about methane leaks, bullying colleagues about publishing the truth, and pushing shale gas as “natural” gas to support the fossil fuel industry. Who speaks out against his behavior? Ernest Moniz Founding Director, MIT Energy Initiative How is MIT broken? Let me count the ways. 1
  10. 10. “The Institute is now moving forward on a new set of ambitious goals and… a significant new fundraising campaign.” President Susan Hockfield Letter to the Community: Looking to the Future Thursday, February 16, 2012 Susan Hockfield Former MIT President 3 How is MIT broken? Let me count the ways.
  11. 11. Chevron Shell Bp Main Cast
  12. 12. Outline for Engagement The overarching question driving GEI is: How can we enable human development that is sustainable? In response the Environmental Research Council (ERC) has focused on six of humanity’s most pressing environmental challenges. • Global Climate Change: Greenhouse gas emissions affect Earth’s chemistry, climate, weather patterns and ocean circulation in ways we are only beginning to understand. Global climate change threatens major disruptions to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as well as human societies. What are the plausible trajectories of the global climate system, and what are the risks and uncertainties associated with each path? How can we better communicate those risks? And how can human societies both mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change? • Health of the Oceans: Overfishing, coastal runoff, habitat disruption, and acidification due to increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide have markedly changed the world’s oceans. Although oceans play a significant role in the climate system and provide vital ecological services, they are poorly understood and ineffectively governed. How have human activities affected the coastal zones and open ocean? How can we reduce our impact on the oceans through better management of coastal development, fishing, and other human activities? • Fresh Water Supply: We are rapidly depleting and degrading our vital fresh water supplies due to unsustainable practices— inefficient irrigation, water-intensive lifestyles and landscaping, groundwater use exceeding replenishment, contamination—and the simple reality of population growth. Already, some one billion people lack reliable access to water, while two billion have inadequate sanitation. How does water circulate through the Earth system, and how are these cycles impacted by climate change? How can we better design households, landscapes, patterns of development and use, agricultural practices and industrial processes to conserve water? What clean water technologies can be developed and implemented effectively? • Resilience of Ecosystems: Ecosystems around the world are under pressure from harvesting, fragmentation, and changes in the water and biogeochemical cycles that sustain them. Many have already experienced major changes, and their future viability is uncertain. What attributes of ecosystems are most critical to their stability? How does biological diversity enhance ecological resilience in the face of natural and human-caused disturbances? How can we properly value ecosystem services so that they remain available to future generations? • Environmental Contamination: Synthetic chemical compounds are becoming ubiquitous in the environment and are accumulating rapidly. Contamination threatens to have both acute and chronic effects on human health and the environment, but those impacts remain poorly understood. What are the chronic and acute effects of exposure to different kinds of contaminants? How can we design chemicals, pharmaceuticals, materials, genetically-modified organisms, and production processes that are benign- by-design? And how can we mitigate the damage from harmful products already in circulation? • Sustainability of Societies: With global population and per capita consumption rising, the strain on Earth’s natural systems can only increase. Meanwhile the world is urbanizing, presenting both challenges and opportunities for societies to become more sustainable. How can developing countries urbanize without exacerbating local and global environmental problems? Can restructuring of industries and markets, adjustments to supply chains, and the adoption of new production practices lead to improved corporate financial and environmental performance? Can we discover design features in natural ecosystems to help guide us toward sustainable human societies? These, together with many other potentially dire and daunting environmental issues, define a vast problem space for environmental research. But while these challenges are enormous and pressing, so are the opportunities to confront them. Indeed, our scientific, technological and social capacities to examine, understand and modulate our effects on the environment are accelerating apace. These include, for example: •
  13. 13. Introduction In October 2011, MIT signed a $300 million agreement with Russia to develop a fracking research center in Moscow, the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology. I am going to hear from African ministers firsthand about their key priorities and concerns, including in relation to adaptation and finance. And we will have much more to say about adaptation and the United States’ work to support it. Now, let me turn to the incredibly important issue of finance. First, we remain strongly committed to the goal of mobilizing $100 billion annually for developing country mitigation and adaptation. President Biden has requested $11 billion for climate finance in his budget request to Congress for the next fiscal year. The United States will do our part to meet the $100 billion goal. Second, we need to work with governments and the private sector to mobilize trillions of dollars to accelerate the net-zero transition as well as to advance climate resilience. It is going to take all of us, and that is why I am happy to be here in Egypt today, as you exercise your global leadership to bring together investors, multilateral development banks, philanthropists, and government to take bold action. Here’s the bottom line: the IEA tells us we need to invest $4 trillion, every year, in this transition. No government on earth can fully fund that level of investment – we can only get there with the full participation of the private sector. In 2021, only about $755 billion was invested globally in the energy transition; that was a record, but only one-third of what we need to meet our 2030 goals. We need public dollars and development finance to catalyze private investment in clean and climate resilient technologies. Our Egyptian hosts are developing a new model to do just that. Through their “Country Platform for NWFE Program,” Egypt is identifying priority climate investment areas and working with partners to develop bankable programs. In total, this has the potential to attract billions in investments
  14. 14. can educate. With the recent introduction of MITx, we are changing the conversation around affordability, access and excellence in higher education. Through last year’s celebration of MIT’s Sesquicentennial, our community emerged reenergized and refocused on our mission of service to the nation and the world. And we achieved all this and more while steering the Institute through the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression. The momentum of all that we have accomplished has tempted me to stay on to see our many efforts bear their full fruit. But to support our ambitious goals for the future, MIT has begun the crucial work of planning for a significant new fundraising campaign. A campaign on this scale will require the full focus and sustained attention of the Institute’s president over many years. I have concluded that it would be best for the Institute to begin this next chapter with new leadership. Presidential searches generally take time; I will serve until my successor is Some introductory remarks
  15. 15. S E M I N A R A N N O U N C E M E N T The MIT-Russia Skoltech Institute presents: THE AGE OF OIL: Stepping into the Future Aug 25, 2022, 6:30 PM | Nature Center, Zaryadye Park “We are running out of oil!” We keep seeing these worrisome headlines every day. Indeed, production of conventional energy sources is an ever-greater technological challenge, and even renewable energy sources rely too much on fossil fuels to become a new reality in energy. In recent years, the oil industry has shifted focus to the microworld with its hard-to-recover oil reserves. The tiniest objects and the slightest details have a marked effect on a major industry, such as oil production. Today, reservoir processes are studied using digital core modeling and microfluidics research, the most advanced tools that help thoroughly investigate the properties of complex objects and answer the pivotal questions: Where are hydrocarbon reserves concentrated? How many of them can potentially be recovered in the most efficient and cost-effective way? Nikita Artyomov, an expert at the Skoltech Center for Petroleum Science and Engineering, graduated from the Department of Oil and Gas Geology and Geophysics at Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas. Nikita focuses on the applications of advanced rock research methods and the modeling and selection of technological solutions for enhanced oil recovery. Prior to joining Skoltech, he directed the oil and gas division at a Russian provider of advanced laboratory services and established Russia’s first specialized laboratory, Digital Core. At Skoltech, he is developing the Digital Core thrust by creating new approaches to the study of hard-to-recover hydrocarbons, modeling complex multicomponent hydrodynamic systems, and building new interdisciplinary teams. Nikita is a member of the Society of Russian Experts on Subsoil Use. 5 How is MIT broken? Let me count the ways.
  16. 16. 2007 Deutch nominates Reif as Schlumberger Director. 2011 MIT signs agreements with Russia to lead development of Skolkovo 2015 Schlumberger settles criminal lawsuit. 2010 ERC publishes report, given mandate to produce final report. 2015 Fossil Free MIT begins protests MIT Publishes a Plan for Action Fossil Free MIT begins 166 day sit in protest. MIT faculty sign petition in support. 2012 ERC publishes report final report. Disband when no engagement from administration. 2007 2008 2009 2011 2010 2 2006 2005 2004 February 16, 2012 Susan Hockfield announces decision to step down 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2011 2010 2009 2006 Deutch writes ‘manifest destiny’ for fossil fuel companies. 2010 Deutch and Reif bring Skolkovo agreement to MIT.
  17. 17. The Mission “We help scale innovative climate solutions, identify and share best practices, and help inform top policy and decision makers in California and China—and beyond.” Gerry Brown, Penny and Mario As the former governor of California and the former Chair of the California Air Resources Board, Gerry Brown and Mary Nichols form a team that influences every single aspect of climate action in California. By default, their actions will be in support of the private sector. Washington Post | March 12, 2022 Putin’s pre-war moves against U.S. tech giants laid groundwork for crackdown on free expression Google and Apple blinked after threats from Russian agents. By Greg Miller and Joseph Menn
  18. 18. Israel Ruiz CEO, WEHO SYSTEMS EXECUTIVE VP & TREASURER Academic Council “Academic Council has changed significantly in form and function, with the net effect of reducing the influence and input of the faculty into MIT affairs.” From “MIT: Where Now?” by Leigh Royden and Rosalind Williams
  19. 19. Bipartisanship Drought, Wildfires For California, climate change is here.
  20. 20. Drought, Wildfires In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. This will be the unacknowledged battlefield for how environmental justice plays out in California, and for how climate action plays out across America. Drought, Wildfires In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. This will be the unacknowledged battlefield for how environmental justice plays out in California, and for how climate action plays out across America. Drought, Wildfires In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. This will be the unacknowledged battlefield for how environmental justice plays out in California, and for how climate action plays out across America.
  21. 21. Debunking the myth of MIT Penny and Mario Backed with a $1.1bn gift from venture capitalist John Doerr, it will be Stanford’s first new school in 70 years, and it will eventually swallow other Stanford centres financed with fossil fuel money, such as the Natural Gas Institute. Not the “solution” More recently, the fossil fuel industry realized that it could no longer support climate denial while maintaining credibility, so its denial strategy shifted to framing itself as the solution to climate change,”
  22. 22. The Mission “We help scale innovative climate solutions, identify and share best practices, and help inform top policy and decision makers in California and China—and beyond.” Gerry Brown, Council on Foreign Relations As the former governor of California and the former Chair of the California Air Resources Board, Gerry Brown and Mary Nichols form a team that influences every single aspect of climate action in California. By default, their actions will be in support of the private sector. Money-Laundering Climate Action Spoiler Alert: Universities are in the Private Sector The PDF The pdf is an invoice. Academic experts believe it is a stage between research and action. It is a wall between research and action.
  23. 23. City of Boston 1. Distributions Any Drupal distribution can be used as a “distribution.” This lifts the responsibility (and costs) of maintenance and development off the shoulders of other cities and towns. City of Brookline City of Fall River City of Amherst City of Boston 2. Modules Any component of a website can be saved as a “module” (app). This allows for gradual improvement of each individual piece of the overall program. Volunteer Program Media Library Blog Adaptation Strategies Young Climate Leaders Drupal
  24. 24. Bipartisanship Commentary For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will Timeline For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will Damage Control For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will Commentary For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. Timeline For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. Damage Control For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before.
  25. 25. The Department of State is designating the SKOLKOVO INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (SKOLTECH) pursuant to Section 1(a)(i) of E.O. 14024 for operating or having operated in the technology sector of the Russian Federation economy. Skoltech is a pioneer in cutting-edge technologies and seeks to foster new technologies to address critical issues facing the Russian Federation. As additional information, for nearly a decade, Skoltech has had a close relationship with Russia’s defense sector. Contributors to Skoltech’s endowment include numerous sanctioned Russian weapon development entities including JSC Tactical Missiles Corporation, Uralvagonzavod (which makes Russian tanks), JSC MIC Mashinostroyenia (which manufactures Russian missiles), JSC United Aircraft Corporation (which manufactures Russia’s combat aircraft), JSC Concern Sozvezdie (which produces electronic warfare systems for the Russian military), JSC Almaz-Antey (which manufactures Russia’s surface-to-air missiles systems), and JSC Corporation Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology (which manufactures Russian missiles). Over the course of the last decade, Skoltech has had partnerships with numerous Russian defense enterprises – including Uralvagonzavod, United Engine Corporation, and United Aircraft Corporation – which have focused on developing composite materials for tanks, engines for ships, specialized materials for aircraft wings, and innovations for defense-related helicopters. Skoltech has also presented advanced robotics at the Russian Ministry of Defense’s premier defense exhibition. JSC Tactical Missiles Missiles JSC United Aircraft Corporation Combat Aircraft, Tanks, Ship engines, aircraft wings, defense- related helicopters JSC Concern Sozvezdie electronic warfare systems JSC United Aircraft Corporation Missiles JSC Almaz-Antey Surface-to-air missiles systems
  26. 26. SCREENCAST 4 Fleet-based Communication Infrastructure DOE | SCEP Washington DOE | SCEP Louisiana DOE | SCEP Massachusetts DOE | SCEP Iowa DOE | SCEP Georgia DOE State and Community Energy Programs DOE | SCEP Cambridge DOE | SCEP Somerville DOE | SCEP Boston DOE | SCEP Medford DOE | SCEP Chelsea Fleet-based Communication Infrastructure Communication is a 2-way street » » Community-building is a group effort
  27. 27. Challenging idea that climate denial is the primary obstacle to climate action. Climate denial is unquestionably a real thing. But it is not the obstacle to climate action. Challenging idea that climate denial is the primary obstacle to climate action. Climate denial is unquestionably a real thing. Challenging idea that climate denial is the primary obstacle to climate action. Climate denial is unquestionably a real thing.
  28. 28. EPA fleet of websites EPA.gov /newengland Heat Pumps Heat Pumps
  29. 29. 2011 Capital Planning and Development Ruiz oversees MIT’s $5.2B 2030 Capital Plan, including the construction or renewal of more than 2,000 residential units. 2013 Rezoning Kendall Square. Israel Ruiz leads the rezoning of 4.5M sq. ft. in Kendall Square to develop a mixed-use innovation and residential district.
  30. 30. can educate. With the recent introduction of MITx, we are changing the conversation around affordability, access and excellence in higher education. Through last year’s celebration of MIT’s Sesquicentennial, our community emerged reenergized and refocused on our mission of service to the nation and the world. And we achieved all this and more while steering the Institute through the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression. The momentum of all that we have accomplished has tempted me to stay on to see our many efforts bear their full fruit. But to support our ambitious goals for the future, MIT has begun the crucial work of planning for a significant new fundraising campaign. A campaign on this scale will require the full focus and sustained attention of the Institute’s president over many years. I have concluded that it would be best for the Institute to begin this next chapter with new leadership. Some introductory remarks
  31. 31. How a 60-year partnership led to the development of a fracking research center in Russia. If Skoltech has been added to U.S. sanctions, why not MIT? Schlumberger & MIT • Slide 1/6
  32. 32. Drought, Wildfires In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. This will be the unacknowledged battlefield for how environmental justice plays out in California, and for how climate action plays out across America.
  33. 33. Schlumberger and MIT From 1960 to 2021, 3 men represented Schlumberger’s interests at MIT. Deutch and Reif were each paid $4.5 million over the 14 years that they served on the Schlumberger board, and each resigned his position only when forced to do so by Schlumberger’s mandatory retirement. EXHIBIT E Jerome Wiesner Schlumberger director (1960- John Deutch Schlumberger director (1987-92, 1997-2007) “Leo” Rafael Reif Schlumberger director (2007-2021)
  34. 34. “The Institute is now moving forward on a new set of ambitious goals, and I have concluded that the powerful momentum we have built makes this an opportune moment for a leadership transition.” Some introductory remarks
  35. 35. How’s this for a horror story. As the former governor of California and the former Chair of the California Air Resources Board, Gerry Brown and The Mission “We help scale innovative climate solutions, identify and share best practices, and help inform top policy and decision makers in California and China—and beyond.” Jerry Brown, How’s this for a horror story. As the former governor of California and the former Chair of the California Air Resources Board, Gerry Brown and
  36. 36. City of Boston 1. Distributions Any Drupal distribution can be used as a “distribution.” This lifts the responsibility (and costs) of maintenance and development off the shoulders of other cities and towns. City of Brookline City of Fall River City of Amherst City of Boston 2. Modules Any component of a website can be saved as a “module” (app). This allows for gradual improvement of each individual piece of the overall program. Volunteer Program Media Library Blog Adaptation Strategies Young Climate Leaders Drupal
  37. 37. Gazprom Neft and Schlumberger sign technological co-operation agreement (2011) 30 May 2011 Gazprom Neft and Schlumberger announce that they have signed a technological co-operation agreement to increase efficiency of hydrocarbon exploration and production at Gazprom Neft's deposits, both in Russia and abroad. Following the signing of the agreement, a coordination committee made up of representatives from both companies has been formed. The co-operation will allow Gazprom Neft to make more effective choices with regard to the new technologies offered by Schlumberger as well as expand opportunities for executive staff training. "Our joint efforts are aimed at establishing a productive business relationship and adapting Schlumberger’s cutting edge technology to Gazprom Neft's needs in order to achieve the best results. This will lead to cutting development costs whilst simultaneously increasing production by ensuring the technological integration of Gazprom Neft’s current projects, both in Russia and abroad", commented Boris Zilbermints, Gazprom Neft's Deputy CEO for Exploration and Production. Notes for editors Schlumberger is one of the world’s leading suppliers of technology to the oil and gas sector, which provides services including: deposit prospecting and exploration, drilling and measurement while drilling, assessment of reservoir characteristics, well services, production control, information technology and consulting. Schlumberger, which has a presence in more than 80 countries, operates in every oil-producing region in Russia and has 50 production sites, research and ENERGY NEWS FEB. 11, 2014 / 7:20 AM Gazprom Neft, Schlumberger target Siberian shale MOSCOW, Feb. 11 (UPI) -- Russian energy company Gazprom Neft said it signed an agreement with oilfield services company Schlumberger to examine shale reserves in Western Siberia. Both sides signed a framework agreement on technology cooperation for shale oil reserve areas in the Khanty-Mansi autonomous district in Western Siberia. Gazprom Neft, the oil subsidiary of gas company Gazprom, said Monday it was drawing on Schlumberger's experience to develop "hard-to-extract" shale oil reserves. Gazprom Neft offered no estimate of the reserve potential and there was no statement from Schlumberger about the agreement. In January, a Russian joint venture between Shell and Gazprom Neft, Salym Petroleum Development, announced it started a five- well drilling program in Siberian shale. In December, Russian energy company Rosneft, one of the largest energy companies in the world, signed an agreement with its Norwegian counterpart Statoil to explore the shale oil potential in the Ural mountains of Russia. Shale development in Russia is in its early stages. Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, two drilling technologies used for shale reserves, has led to an oil and natural gas boom in North America. Gaz exp dev (201 10 Feb Gazpro their F was m achiev shale o Siberia In the Neft p the Pal coope non-co Distric activiti Schlum Abalak develo As a te Neft w and ex uncon Neft an Coord object Bazhen expert Techni Gazprom Neft and Schlumberger sign technological co-
  38. 38. z City of Schlumberge r behind MIT deal with Russia. FBI z Did MIT violate Did Globe CEO MIT Graduat e Why did Susan 5M Antonine Reif appoin Maria Zuber. 165 - 180 What happene d to the $5.2 The Jefrey Epstein Coverup. FBI Maria Zuber writes an
  39. 39. Schlumberger | Timeline | Canes | Energy Club | Sustainability | Drupal Group | Skolkovo Institute Drought, Wildfires For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. This will be the unacknowledged battlefield for how environmental justice plays out in California, and for how climate action plays out across America. Drought, Wildfires For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before.
  40. 40. Looking to the Future Thursday, February 16, 2012 I write to share with you my decision to step down from the presidency of MIT. Over the past seven years, working together we have accomplished far more than I set out to do. The Institute is now moving forward on a new set of ambitious goals, and I have concluded that the powerful momentum we have built makes this an opportune moment for a leadership transition. I came to MIT in December 2004 with a profound sense of the privilege and the responsibility of the president’s role. But nothing could have prepared me for this remarkable community of creative minds. Together, we have made tremendous progress in dozens of ways, strengthening MIT’s foundations and setting our sights for the future. We are designing the policy, technology and education required to address the global need for sustainable energy. We have accelerated MIT’s ability to synthesize the strengths of science and engineering to fight disease and to invent new powers of computation. We have expanded the Institute’s global connections. We are charting a course to a new future for American manufacturing. We have also built a framework for the future of our campus and neighborhood, fortified the Institute’s financial structures, strengthened MIT’s culture of inclusion and increased the number of undergraduates we can educate. With the recent introduction of MITx, we are changing the conversation around affordability, access and excellence in higher education. Through last year’s celebration of MIT’s Sesquicentennial, our community emerged reenergized and refocused on our mission of service to the nation and the world. And we achieved all this and more while steering the Institute through the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression. “The Institute is now moving forward on a new set of ambitious goals, and I have concluded that the powerful momentum we have built makes this an opportune moment for a leadership transition.” Susan Hockfield
  41. 41. Letter to the Community: Looking to the Future Thursday, February 16, 2012 I write to share with you my decision to step down from the presidency of MIT. Over the past seven years, working together we have accomplished far more than I set out to do. The Institute is now moving forward on a new set of ambitious goals, and I have concluded that the powerful momentum we have built makes this an opportune moment for a leadership transition. I came to MIT in December 2004 with a profound sense of the privilege and the responsibility of the president’s role. But nothing could have prepared me for this remarkable community of creative minds. Together, we have made tremendous progress in dozens of ways, strengthening MIT’s foundations and setting our sights for the future. We are designing the policy, technology and education required to address the global need for sustainable energy. We have accelerated MIT’s ability to synthesize the strengths of science and engineering to fight disease and to invent new powers of computation. We have expanded the Institute’s global connections. We are charting a course to a new future for American manufacturing. We have also built a framework for the future of our campus and neighborhood, fortified the Institute’s financial structures, strengthened MIT’s culture of inclusion and increased the number of undergraduates we can educate. With the recent introduction of MITx, we are changing the conversation around affordability,
  42. 42. Thursday, February 16, 2012 I write to share with you my decision to step down from the presidency of MIT. Over the past seven years, working together we have accomplished far more than I set out to do. The Institute is now moving forward on a new set of ambitious goals, and I have concluded that the powerful momentum we have built makes this an opportune moment for a leadership transition. I came to MIT in December 2004 with a profound sense of the privilege and the responsibility of the president’s role… The momentum of all that we have accomplished has tempted me to stay on to see our many efforts bear their full fruit. But to support our ambitious goals for the future, MIT has begun the crucial work of planning for a significant new fundraising campaign. A campaign on this scale will require the full focus and sustained attention of the Institute’s president over many years. I have concluded that it would be best for the Institute to begin this next chapter with new leadership. Presidential searches generally take time; I will serve until my successor is selected by the MIT Corporation and is ready to assume the role. I look forward to continuing to be a member of the MIT faculty… Most sincerely, Susan Hockfield Office of the President
  43. 43. This is the top heading And this is the text for this sidebar comment on this page. April 17, 2012 To the members of the MIT community, I am pleased to accept the final report of the Environmental Research Council (ERC), Implementing the MIT Global Environment Initiative. The report incorporates input received from a forum held December 15, 2011 that presented results of the draft report and the inputs from a subsequent comment period. I thank the ERC and in particular its Chair, Professor Dara Entekhabi, for producing a compelling vision of MIT's role in advancing sustainability and in addressing pressing environmental issues. I commend the ERC for identifying strategic research themes that transcend disciplinary boundaries and which integrate scientific understanding, engineering solutions, and social research to synthesize new approaches to the world's environmental challenges. The report also describes a portfolio of current and new educational offerings, including a new undergraduate minor in Environment and Sustainability. The video of the recent forum on Environmental Research can be viewed at http://techtv.mit.edu/collections/erc and the final ERC report can be accessed here. I have asked Professor John H. Lienhard V and Professor Maria T. Zuber to co-lead a Global Environment Initiative (GEI) planning group to prepare a proposal for execution for consideration by the next administration. They will focus on plans for resource development and coordination of potential future activities across the Institute. The pressures on vital environmental systems and questions about their sustainability have profound implications for human welfare. The goals outlined in the ERC report define important opportunities for research and education on one of the most pressing challenges facing humanity today. Sincerely, L. Rafael Reif, Provost Maseeh Professor of Emerging Technology
  44. 44. Final Report of the Environmental Research Council (ERC) April 17, 2012 To the members of the MIT community, I am pleased to accept the final report of the Environmental Research Council (ERC), Implementing the MIT Global Environment Initiative. The report incorporates input received from a forum held December 15, 2011 that presented results of the draft report and the inputs from a subsequent comment period. I thank the ERC and in particular its Chair, Professor Dara Entekhabi, for producing a compelling vision of MIT's role in advancing sustainability and in addressing pressing environmental issues. I commend the ERC for identifying strategic research themes that transcend disciplinary boundaries and which integrate scientific understanding, engineering solutions, and social research to synthesize new approaches to the world's environmental challenges. The report also describes a portfolio of current and new educational offerings, including a new undergraduate minor in Environment and Sustainability. The video of the recent forum on Environmental Research can be viewed at http://techtv.mit.edu/collections/erc and the final ERC report can be accessed here. I have asked Professor John H. Lienhard V and Professor Maria T. Zuber to co-lead a Global Environment Initiative (GEI) planning group to prepare a proposal for execution for consideration by the next administration. They will focus on plans for resource development and coordination of potential future activities across the Institute. The pressures on vital environmental systems and questions about their sustainability have profound implications for human welfare. The goals outlined in the ERC report define important opportunities for research and education on one of the most pressing challenges facing humanity today. Sincerely, L. Rafael Reif, Provost Maseeh Professor of Emerging Technology April 17, 2012 Rafael Reif’s extraordinary email to MIT Community With characteristic duplicity, he says he’s happy to accept an environmental plan that MIT faculty spent 4 years developing. But in fact, he’s disingenuously slipping in Maria Zuber to write the report that MIT’s fossil fuel sponsors want. She delivers on November 12 and Reif, now President, appoints her as the Vice President of MIT Research.
  45. 45. Letter to the Community: Looking to the Future Thursday, February 16, 2012 I write to share with you my decision to step down from the presidency of MIT. Over the past seven years, working together we have accomplished far more than I set out to do. The Institute is now moving forward on a new set of ambitious goals, and I have concluded that the powerful momentum we have built makes this an opportune moment for a leadership transition. I came to MIT in December 2004 with a profound sense of the privilege and the responsibility of the president’s role. But nothing could have prepared me for this remarkable community of creative minds. Together, we have made tremendous progress in dozens of ways, strengthening MIT’s foundations and setting our sights for the future. We are designing the policy, technology and education required to address the global need for sustainable energy. Some introductory remarks
  46. 46. “The Institute is now moving forward on a new set of ambitious goals, and I have concluded that the powerful momentum we have built makes this an opportune moment for a leadership transition.” SUSAN HOCKFIELD
  47. 47. This section describes how divestment emerged as an issue on our campus and why we have chosen not to divest. The student-led group Fossil Free MIT has presented a petition with around 3,400 community signatures, calling on MIT to divest any holdings in a group of 200 fossil fuel companies whose identified reserves, if burned, would send the global climate over the 2°C limit that we highlighted in Section I. Their goal, as we understand it from them, is to use the pressure of an international movement of high-profile institutional divestment to draw attention to the seriousness of the climate threat, and to trigger action against it, by publicly stigmatizing the practices of the fossil fuel industry. We agree entirely on the seriousness and urgency of the climate threat, and on the need for MIT to play a public leadership role. However, after studying this question, we conclude that divestment is incompatible with the strategy of engagement that forms the heart of today’s plan. Serious action to confront climate change demands intense collaboration across the research community, industry and government; divestment would thwart our ability to collaborate and to convene opposing parties and inspire united action. In our judgment, a symbolic public move to divest is not the most effective way for MIT to drive progress on the climate challenge, and pursuing it would interfere with the two strategies MIT should pursue because of their promise for direct progress: active engagement and bold convening. As the plan we share today makes clear, we find that the best way for MIT to accelerate action on the climate challenge—in science, in technology, in policy and in the education of our students—is active engagement with organizations of many kinds. Rapid progress will depend on our collaborating with a wide range of industry partners, from the most disruptive local solar start-ups to fossil fuel giants that have mastered the challenges of delivering energy to millions of households. Furthermore, acceleration will depend on our ability to help industry and government understand each other, on the road to designing sound policy incentives. We also see a unique opportunity for MIT to serve as a convener of widely different voices and sectors—from activists to industry leaders—to help shift the public dialogue on climate from deadlocked argument to a constructive conversation about solving problems. Some argue that it would be possible to take a symbolic stance against greenhouse gas emissions by publicly divesting from fossil fuel holdings, while also continuing to work with fossil fuel companies in these many contexts. We disagree. In our judgment, the deliberate public act of divestment would entangle MIT in a movement whose core tactic is large-scale public shaming. This would retard rather than encourage the open collaboration and ability to hear new ideas that are central to our research relationships, central to our ability to help government and business think creatively together, and central to our ability to convene and inform the thinking of those with opposing views. Throughout the last two years, the student leaders of Fossil Free MIT have acted with great respect, in a spirit of candor and collaboration. We believe that we should behave the same way toward fossil fuel companies. We are not naïve about the pernicious role of some segments of the fossil fuel industry in creating the current policy deadlock. We deplore the practice of “disinformation,” through which some industry players and related groups have obstructed public understanding of the problem of climate change. We are engaged in candid conversations with industry allies, and we will continue to advocate frankly with them as we all work together for systemic solutions to climate change, including a price on carbon; such a policy shift would change the incentives for us all and make fossil fuel companies, a rich source of technical talent, a central source of progress. A tipping point As with the protection of the ozone layer, well-crafted policies can harness the creative forces of industry to serve the common good. We judge that growing awareness of climate change may be generating a tipping point in that policy dynamic now. Witness the fact that in Paris last Friday, October 16, 2015, the CEOs of ten of the world’s largest oil and gas companies declared that their “shared ambition is for a 2°C future,” and called for “an effective climate change agreement” at next month’s 21 Framework Six of thos Total—are m to build on fossil fuel c We have c MIT petitio of Fossil Fr Committee advancing technolog coordinate they broug agenda by We step up new ideas communit including t help this v The Question of Divestment By L. Rafael Reif. | October 21, 2015
  48. 48. This section describes how divestment emerged as an issue on our campus and why we have chosen not to divest. The student-led group Fossil Free MIT has presented a petition with around 3,400 community signatures, calling on MIT to divest any holdings in a group of 200 fossil fuel companies whose identified reserves, if burned, would send the global climate over the 2°C limit that we highlighted in Section I. Their goal, as we understand it from them, is to use the pressure of an international movement of high-profile institutional divestment to draw attention to the seriousness of the climate threat, and to trigger action against it, by publicly stigmatizing the practices of the fossil fuel industry. We agree entirely on the seriousness and urgency of the climate threat, and on the need for MIT to play a public leadership role. However, after studying this question, we conclude that divestment is incompatible with the strategy of engagement that forms the heart of today’s plan. Serious action to confront climate change demands intense collaboration across the research community, industry and government; divestment would thwart our ability to collaborate and to convene opposing parties and inspire united action. In our judgment, a symbolic public move to divest is not the most effective way for MIT to drive progress on the climate challenge, and pursuing it would interfere with the two strategies MIT should pursue because of their promise for direct progress: active engagement and bold convening. As the plan we share today makes clear, we find that the best way for MIT to accelerate action on the climate challenge—in science, in technology, in policy and in the education of our students—is active engagement with organizations of many kinds. Rapid progress will depend on our collaborating with a wide range of industry partners, from the most disruptive local solar start- ups to fossil fuel giants that have mastered the challenges of delivering energy to millions of households. Furthermore, acceleration will depend on our ability to help industry and government understand each other, on the road to designing sound policy incentives. We also see a unique opportunity for MIT to serve as a convener of widely different voices and sectors—from activists to industry leaders—to help shift the public dialogue on climate from deadlocked argument to a constructive conversation about solving problems. Some argue that it would be possible to take a symbolic stance against greenhouse gas emissions by publicly divesting from fossil fuel holdings, while also continuing to work with fossil fuel companies in these many contexts. We disagree. In our judgment, the deliberate public act of divestment would entangle MIT in a movement whose core tactic is large-scale public shaming. This would retard rather than encourage the open collaboration and ability to hear new ideas that are central to our research relationships, central to our ability to help government and business think creatively together, and central to our ability to convene and inform the thinking of those with opposing views. Throughout the last two years, the student leaders of Fossil Free MIT have acted with great respect, in a spirit of candor and collaboration. We believe that we should behave the same way toward fossil fuel companies. We are not naïve about the pernicious role of some segments of the fossil fuel industry in creating the current policy deadlock. We deplore the practice of “disinformation,” through which some industry players and related groups have obstructed public understanding of the problem of climate change. We are engaged in candid conversations with industry allies, and we will continue to advocate frankly with them as we all work together for systemic solutions to climate change, including a price on carbon; such a policy shift would change the incentives for us all and make fossil fuel companies, a rich source of technical talent, a central source of progress. A tipping point As with the protection of the ozone layer, well- crafted policies can harness the creative forces of industry to serve the common good. We judge that growing awareness of climate change may be generating a tipping point in that policy dynamic now. Witness the fact that in Paris last Friday, October 16, 2015, the CEOs of ten of the world’s largest oil and gas companies declared that their “shared ambition is for a 2°C future,” and called for “an effective climate change agreement” at next month’s 21st session of the UN Conference of Parties to the UN Framework on Climate Change (COP21). Six of those companies—BP, Eni, Saudi Aramco, Shell, Statoil and Total—are members of MITEI. We believe we have greater power to build on such momentum not by distancing ourselves from fossil fuel companies, but by bringing them closer to us. We have chosen different tactics than those in the Fossil Free MIT petition. But our ultimate goal is not different. The members of Fossil Free MIT and the Climate Change Conversation Committee, many of whom are personally engaged in advancing leading-edge climate science and renewable energy technologies, stimulated much of the thinking that produced the coordinated commitments in the plan we issue today. Above all, they brought climate change to the top of MIT’s institutional agenda by urging that MIT assume a role of public leadership. We step up to that challenge with this plan—and with the tide of new ideas and energy we hope it will unlock across the global community of MIT. We hope everyone in our community—including those who wish we had divested—will work with us to help this vital effort succeed. The Question of Divestment By L. Rafael Reif. | October 21, 2015 “…the deliberate public act of divestment would entangle MIT in a movement whose core tactic is large-scale public shaming. …” — Rafael Reif — “The Question of Divestment” (2015)
  49. 49. Bipartisanship This can be a headline This is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing furtherThis is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing further. This is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing further. This can be a headline This is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing furtherThis is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing further. This is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing further. This can be a headline This is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing furtherThis is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing further. This is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing further. This can be a headline This is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing furtherThis is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing further. This is some text to get the ball rolling. And I can continuously ad to it and see what that brings. And then take the whole thing further.
  50. 50. 2011 Capital Planning and Development Ruiz oversees MIT’s $5.2B 2030 Capital Plan, including the construction or renewal of more than 2,000 residential units. 2013 Rezoning Kendall Square. Israel Ruiz leads the rezoning of 4.5M sq. ft. in Kendall Square to develop a mixed-use innovation and residential district. 2017 The Engine Launch Ruiz helps create and launch The Engine to accelerate the market impact of research in areas of science and technology. 2020 WoHo launches Ruiz raises $4.5 million through The Engine to launch WoHo Systems.
  51. 51. U.S. ClHopepage panelsimate Envoy in Africa Ernie Moniz lying about shale gas as a “low carbon” bridge to the future. The most extraordinary thing about the frontline documentary, the Power of Big Oil, is that, a decade after the fact, Ernie Moniz doubles down on the lies that he told in 2011. Deutch &Reif bring “Skoltech deal to MIT. Report to the FBI — Ed Carlevale — May 31, 2022 How MIT became a for-profit Corporation serving the fossil fuel industry. Report to the FBI — Ed Carlevale — May 31, 2022 Reif and Ruiz launch $5.2 billion Capital Plan Report to the FBI — Ed Carlevale — May 31, 2022 2011 APRIL 2011 APRIL Wrong message, wrong mission, wrong man
  52. 52. US climate envoy John Kerry announced financial support for an African Development Bank program to reduce methane emissions in Africa. September 15, 2022 at 7:00 AM EDT The US will give the Abidjan-based lender $5 million for its Africa Climate Change Fund and an additional $5 million will come from the Global Methane Hub over the next three years, while $1.2 million will be sourced from a number of other donors, the AfDB said in a statement on Thursday.
  53. 53. THE FIRST RULE OF RESEARCH AT MIT: DO NO HARM TO FOSSIL FUELS
  54. 54. Introducing the Amazing Mr. Ruiz. The latest Consumer Pulse survey shows that, across America, people have simultaneously embraced new behaviors and reverted to old ones. What will they do next? Understand the trends Explore more insights on marketing and sales
  55. 55. The momentum of all that we have accomplished has tempted me to stay on to see our many efforts bear their full fruit. But to support our ambitious goals for the future, MIT has begun the crucial work of planning for a significant new fundraising campaign. A campaign on this scale will require the full focus and sustained attention of the Institute’s president over many years. I have concluded that it would be best for the Institute to begin this next chapter with new leadership. Presidential searches generally take time; I will serve until my successor is selected by the MIT Corporation and is ready to assume the role. I look forward to continuing to be a member of the MIT faculty. The coming months will offer many opportunities to reflect on our work together, but for now, let me simply thank the faculty, students, staff, alumni and friends of MIT who have given of themselves to advance the mission of MIT. While I expect new intellectual adventures ahead, nothing will compare Most sincerely, Susan Hockfield Office of the President Room 3-208 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  56. 56. “We believe that we should behave [with great respect] toward fossil fuel companies.” MIT President Rafael Reif, “The Question of Divestment” A Plan for Action at MIT (2015)
  57. 57. POSTJUNE 27, 2020 Evaluating Dr. Maria Zuber’s Response to MIT Divest’s Information Request MIT Divest is grateful for Dr. Zuber’s response to the information request(link is external) especially given the upheaval on campus this spring when COVID-19 forced students, faculty, staff, researchers, and administrators off campus. Dr. Zuber and her team have been busy in developing the guidelines and scenarios to bring research back on campus, and MIT Divest is appreciative of the work being done towards this goal. MIT Divest has spent the last few weeks going over Dr. Zuber’s response to the inquiry, and wanted to share thoughts regarding the answers that Dr. Zuber provided. Although we are pleased that some partnerships with fossil fuel companies have driven sustainability-oriented research, we are extremely disappointed to see that MIT’s partnerships have not created important change regarding climate policy and disinformation. It is clear that MIT has not done well in holding fossil fuel companies accountable for their anti- climate lobbying, greenwashing, climate disinformation campaigns, and other climate policy mechanisms. At the end of the day, MIT Divest believes that divestment holds these companies accountable and ensures that MIT, as a leader in science and technology, does not stand complicit with the behaviors of fossil fuel companies. MIT Divest’s response is as follows: Part 1 MIT Divest asked for more information regarding the definition and goals of engagement as outlined in the 2015 Climate Action Plan. As an institute of higher education, we must critically and thoroughly review the major tenets of the 2015 Climate Action Plan in order to pursue effective methods for contributing to climate solutions. It is absolutely necessary to look towards future solutions, but it is also important to understand the successes and missteps of our previous attempts. Regarding MIT’s engagement in policy and government, we recognize that MIT is not equipped to engage in political lobbying at a large scale. As Dr. Zuber indicates, our strengths as a university favor research and scientific pursuits above political advocacy. However, this does not excuse us from using these competencies selectively. The MIT Washington Office effectively lobbies for research and university funding, as these issues are more directly related to MIT’s activity. However, climate change is an issue that is pressing, existential, and time-sensitive. This is agreed on by an overwhelming majority of the scientific community, including many of MIT’s greatest climate scientists. Our political activity must reflect the urgency of climate change, and reject the politicization of the issue. We must advocate based on the
  58. 58. Schlumberger | Timeline | Canes | Energy Club | Sustainability | Drupal Group | Fossil Fuels Deutch and Reif Two longtime directors of the Schlumberger oil services company (15 and 14 years, respectively). When Susan Hockfield said “The Institute is moving forward,..” It turns out that it was only John Deutch and Rafael Reif Susan Hockfield More Clarence Thomas than Anita Hill, alas. In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before.
  59. 59. For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. For California, climate change is here. In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. PANEL TITLE
  60. 60. Maria Zuber and John Kerry Report to the FBI — Ed Carlevale — May 31, 2022 THE INNOVATION HUB Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology MIT develops fossil fuel research center in Moscow, focused on shale and Arctic oil development. THE INNOVATION ORCHARD The Engine In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been THE INNOVATION PLAYBOOK Maria Zuber Greenwashing Guide In a month, the California wildfire season will take off. Coping with it will test the state and cities in a way they have never been tested before. This will be the
  61. 61. April 17, 2012 To the members of the MIT community, I am pleased to accept the final report of the Environmental Research Council (ERC), Implementing the MIT Global Environment Initiative. The report incorporates input received from a forum held December 15, 2011 that presented results of the draft report and the inputs from a subsequent comment period. I thank the ERC and in particular its Chair, Professor Dara Entekhabi, for producing a compelling vision of MIT's role in advancing sustainability and in addressing pressing environmental issues. I commend the ERC for identifying strategic research themes that transcend disciplinary boundaries and which integrate scientific understanding, engineering solutions, and social research to synthesize new approaches to the world's environmental challenges. The report also describes a portfolio of current and new educational offerings, including a new undergraduate minor in Environment and Sustainability. The video of the recent forum on Environmental Research can be viewed at http://techtv.mit.edu/collections/erc and the final ERC report can be accessed here. I have asked Professor John H. Lienhard V and Professor Maria T. Zuber to co-lead a Global Environment Initiative (GEI) planning group to prepare a proposal for execution for consideration by the next administration. They will focus on plans for resource development and coordination of potential future activities across the Institute. The pressures on vital environmental systems and questions about their sustainability have profound implications for human welfare. The goals outlined in the ERC report define important opportunities for research and education on one of the most pressing challenges facing humanity today. Sincerely, L. Rafael Reif, Provost Maseeh Professor of Emerging Technology
  62. 62. Two trillion barrels of shale. And billions more in the Arctic. “Innovation Hub” Greenwashing
  63. 63. A “quiet revolution” in December 2012 At the December 2012 quarterly meeting of the Corporation, a quiet revolution in MIT governance took place. Unnoticed by nearly all faculty, this changed the dynamic balance that had previously existed between the Executive Committee and MIT’s senior leadership. In a series of votes by the Corporation, what had formerly been “Bylaws of The Corporation” were renamed “Bylaws of MIT.” Hundreds of changes were made to the Bylaws, with the new Bylaws stating that “The members of the Corporation constitute the government of MIT.” These changes confirmed and extended the purview of the Executive Committee: “The Executive Committee shall have responsibility for overseeing the general administration and superintendence of all matters relating to the Institute.”1 Most significantly, the Executive Committee would no longer be chaired by the president of MIT, but by the chair of the Corporation. This means de facto that the Executive Committee is no longer likely to be headed by someone with experience as an academic leader. The lack of academic experience now extends to the entire Executive Committee where, at present, only one of the seven term members has significant academic leadership experience. All these changes add up to a new relationship between the university and the Corporation. In the words of a Tech article at the time, “The Corporation appears not to be styling itself as a separate entity with oversight responsibility for MIT, but rather implying that its oversight is part of MIT itself.”2 One faculty member we talked with commented that “It used to feel like MIT faculty and senior leadership worked together to control the Corporation. Now it feels like the Corporation and senior leadership are joining forces to control the faculty.” (Continued next page) “At the December 2012 quarterly meeting of the Corporation, a quiet revolution in MIT governance took place.”
  64. 64. UKRAINE-/RUSSIA-RELATED SANCTIONS 418. How does OFAC interpret the term "shale projects" with respect to the prohibitions in Directive 4, now incorporated into § 589.205 of the Ukraine-/Russia-Related Sanctions Regulations (URSR)? Answer The term "shale projects," as defined in § 589.334 of the URSR, includes projects that have the potential to produce oil from resources located in shale formations as well as projects that have the potential to produce oil from resources located in fine-grained sedimentary rock formations including shale, limestone, dolomites, sandstones, and clay. Date Updated: April 29, 2022 Date Released October 31, 2017
  65. 65. UKRAINE-/RUSSIA-RELATED SANCTIONS 412. What do the prohibitions contained in Directive 4 mean? What is the scope of prohibited services? Answer Directive 4, as amended on October 31, 2017 in accordance with CAATSA, imposes two prohibitions on the provision, exportation, or reexportation of goods, services (except for financial services), or technology for certain activities involving persons subject to Directive 4, their property, or their interests in property, operating in the energy sector of the Russian Federation. First, Directive 4 prohibits the direct or indirect provision, exportation, or reexportation of goods, services (except for financial services), or technology in support of exploration or production for deepwater, Arctic offshore, or shale projects that have the potential to produce oil in the Russian Federation, or in maritime area claimed by the Russian Federation and extending from its territory, and that involve any person determined to be subject to Directive 4 or such person’s property or interests in property. Second, pursuant to section 223(d) of Title II of CAATSA, Directive 4 further prohibits the direct or indirect provision, exportation, or reexportation of goods, services (except for financial services), or technology in support of exploration or production for deepwater, Arctic offshore, or shale projects that meet all three of the following criteria: (1) the project was initiated on or after January 29, 2018; (2) the project has the potential to produce oil in any location; and (3) any person determined to be subject to Directive 4 or any earlier version thereof, including their property or interests in property, either has a 33 percent or greater ownership interest in the project or owns a majority of the voting interests in the project. The prohibitions on the exportation of services include, for example, drilling services, geophysical services, geological services, logistical services, management services, modeling capabilities, and mapping technologies. The prohibitions do not apply to the provision of financial services, e.g., clearing transactions or providing insurance related to such activities. When Directive 4 was implemented on September 12, 2014, OFAC contemporaneously issued General License 2, which authorized for 14 days all services and activities prohibited by Directive 4 that are ordinarily incident and necessary to the wind down of operations, contracts, or other agreements involving persons determined to be subject to Directive 4. In order to qualify under this General License, a transaction must have (1) occurred prior to 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on September 26, 2014, and (2) been related to operations, contracts, or agreements that were in effect prior to September 12, 2014. General License 2 did not authorize any new provision, exportation, or re-exportation of goods, services, or technology except as needed to cease operations, contracts, or other agreements involving affected projects. See section 746.5 of the Export Administration Regulations (15 C.F.R. parts 730 through 774) for the Department of Commerce’s related license requirement on exports of certain goods for specified deepwater, Arctic offshore, or shale projects. Date Released October 31, 2017
  66. 66. “The Institute is now mov ambitious goals, an powerful momentum opportune moment
  67. 67. “The Institute is now moving forward on a new set of ambitious goals, and I have concluded that the powerful momentum we have built makes this an opportune moment for a leadership transition.” Some introductory remarks

×