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Thurrock Early Years Conference 2019

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This is the PowerPoint to accompany my keynote about helping disadvantaged children to succeed.

Publicada em: Educação
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Thurrock Early Years Conference 2019

  1. 1. Dr Julian Grenier grenier@outlook.com @juliangrenier How can we help children to succeed against the odds?
  2. 2. Today’s keynote The word gap What can we do about “gaps” in the early years? Self-regulation – does it matter? Repertoire We can make a difference for disadvantaged children
  3. 3. Today’s keynote The word gap What can we do about “gaps” in the early years? Self-regulation – does it matter? Repertoire We can make a difference for disadvantaged children
  4. 4. It’s not just words EXPERIENCES CONVERSATIONS
  5. 5. • Video from www.sirenfilms.co.uk: • Tristan walking down the street
  6. 6. It’s not just words • The number of ‘conversational turns’ parents have with children aged 18-24 months is a stronger predictor of verbal comprehension and vocabulary 10 years later than the total number of words spoken, even after controlling for socioeconomic status. • http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/c ontent/142/4/e20174276
  7. 7. Balancing: sometimes we must wait. Other times, we must take the initiative so that children get interested and then we can pay attention together
  8. 8. Today’s keynote The word gap What can we do about “gaps” in the early years? Self-regulation – does it matter? Repertoire We can make a difference for disadvantaged children
  9. 9. Child development and learning through play
  10. 10. • Video from www.sirenfilms.co.uk: • Skye – natural materials
  11. 11. Planning for play • Time and space • Fascinating materials • Rich first-hand experiences
  12. 12. Are we available for play and conversation?
  13. 13. Rich experiences and building on children’s interests • Lots of trips out • Widening children’s and families’ horizons • Noticing and developing children’s interests – not just repetition of low-level play or activity • Think about grouping and inclusion
  14. 14. Play is important “There is good evidence that being involved in imaginative play either with an adult, or with other children, is advantageous in terms of young children’s language development.” David Whitebread, University of Cambridge
  15. 15. Interactive book-reading Using books to encourage conversation and help children to increase their vocabulary
  16. 16. • Video from www.sirenfilms.co.uk: • Heidi looks at a book about thunder
  17. 17. Developing a love of books?
  18. 18. Today’s keynote The word gap What can we do about “gaps” in the early years? Self-regulation – does it matter? Repertoire We can make a difference for disadvantaged children
  19. 19. Executive function and self-regulation skills are the mental processes that enable us to plan, focus attention, remember instructions, and juggle multiple tasks successfully. Just as an air traffic control system at a busy airport safely manages the arrivals and departures of many aircraft on multiple runways, the brain needs this skill set to filter distractions, prioritize tasks, set and achieve goals, and control impulses.
  20. 20. Executive function and self-regulation skills depend on three types of brain function: working memory, mental flexibility, and self- control.
  21. 21. • Working memory governs our ability to retain and manipulate distinct pieces of information over short periods of time. • Mental flexibility helps us to sustain or shift attention in response to different demands or to apply different rules in different settings. • Self-control enables us to set priorities and resist impulsive actions or responses.
  22. 22. • Children aren’t born with these skills—they are born with the potential to develop them. • Growth-promoting environments provide children with “scaffolding” • That helps them practise necessary skills before they must perform them alone. Adults can facilitate the development of a child’s executive function skills by establishing routines, modelling social behaviour, and creating and maintaining supportive, reliable relationships
  23. 23. What can we do? • Pretend play helps children to develop their understanding of their own thinking, the understanding of others, and to co-operate (and control their impulses) • David Whitebread: self- regulation, in some ways, is the strongest predictor of success. If you can regulate your attention at four, you are more likely to do well in school and go onto university. • Key person approach and strong, consistent routines are also important
  24. 24. Today’s keynote The word gap What can we do about “gaps” in the early years? Self-regulation – does it matter? Repertoire We can make a difference for disadvantaged children
  25. 25. What’s in our repertoire? • Playing with children • Reading and singing • Helping children to learn new skills through direct teaching • Planning trips out and brining exciting and different things into your setting • Giving children time to practise and rehearse • Planning for progress
  26. 26. Today’s keynote The word gap What can we do about “gaps” in the early years? Self-regulation – does it matter? Repertoire We can make a difference for disadvantaged children
  27. 27. Early education matters more to disadvantaged children
  28. 28. EPPE findings ‘Pre-school on its own is not a “magic bullet”. It does not remove but can help ameliorate the adverse impact of disadvantage.’ By age 16 the quality of pre- school was especially important for children whose parents had low or no qualifications. Students of low qualified parents who attended high quality pre-school had better grades in GCSE English and in maths compared to similar students who had not attended pre-school. https://dera.ioe.ac.uk/23344/1/R B455_Effective_pre- school_primary_and_secondary_ education_project.pdf
  29. 29. Make a difference Time, space and stimulating things to talk about Help children to build a bigger vocabulary – interactive book reading Support children’s growing self-regulation – play, secure relationships and routines Repertoire – choosing the right time for playing, teaching, listening, chatting and organising Help children to succeed against the odds

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