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[DevDay2019] Lean UX - By Bryant Castro, Bryant Castro at Wizeline

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Lean UX helps teams build the minimal product necessary to validate risky assumptions and minimize the time to market with the right product. On this lecture, Lean UX principles and its value to the product cycle will be introduced. Also, the methods and tools that will help you get feedback from users and learn rapidly will be discussed. This session is geared towards those who are interested in UX but have no much experience, those looking for new methods to improve their current product processes, and anyone interested in design, business, and user centered design.

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[DevDay2019] Lean UX - By Bryant Castro, Bryant Castro at Wizeline

  1. 1. Today’s Agenda ● What is Lean UX? ○ Introduction & Principles ● Get going. ○ Hypothesis (assumption/problem statement) ○ Market / Personas ● Design it. ○ Collaborative design ● Build an MVP ○ Validate ○ Concept vs. Usability testing ● Research ○ Scripts and moderator tips
  2. 2. Lean UX An introduction.
  3. 3. From idea to validation.
  4. 4. Intro ● Origins of Lean ● Lean Startup ● Lean Ux
  5. 5. Origins of Lean
  6. 6. Toyota Production system Jidoka Intelligent Automation 1890s Just in time manufacturing 1960s Kiichiro Toyoda{
  7. 7. “Automation with a human touch” ● Power looms by Sakichi Toyoda ● Complex Processes ● Manual > High Speed Looms ● One operator could oversee over 30 looms Jidoka Intelligent Automation
  8. 8. ● Eliminate waste and Inconsistencies to improve productivity. Just In Time Manufacturing “Making what’s needed, when it’s needed, in the amount needed”
  9. 9. Lean manufacturing is a systematic method for waste minimization within a production service system that does not sacrifices productivity.
  10. 10. Lean Startup
  11. 11. A startup is a human institution designed to create a new product or service under conditions of extreme uncertainty.
  12. 12. ● Author of The Lean Startup ● CTO at IMVU Eric Ries Entrepreneur and Author
  13. 13. ● Allowed user to create custom 3d avatars ● Messaging networks ● When released, nobody download it IMVU Avatar based social experience
  14. 14. Waterfall Build - Measure - Learn Vs.
  15. 15. Build Measure Learn Enter the build phase as quickly as possible (MVP) Determine whether product development efforts are leading to real progress Persevere or Pivot
  16. 16. Minimum Viable Product
  17. 17. It is a set of practices that help entrepreneurs increase their chances of building a successful startup.
  18. 18. Lean UX
  19. 19. Inspired by Lean Startup and Agile Development , it’s the practice of bringing the true nature of a product to light faster, in a collaborative, cross-functional way.
  20. 20. 3 Foundations of Lean UX ● Design Thinking ● Lean Startup ● Agile
  21. 21. ● Helps us widen the scope of our work beyond interfaces and artifacts. ● Apply design tools to broader problems. ● Relies on collaboration, iteration, making and empathy as core to problem-solving. Design thinking
  22. 22. ● Refocuses software development on shorter cycles. ● Delivers value regularly, and continuous learning. ● Gets ideas to customers quicker, senses how these ideas are received, and adjusts frequently to new learnings along the way. Agile
  23. 23. ● Remove waste from our UX design process. ● Collaboration that brings non-designers into our design process. ● Rapid experimentation and measurement to learn quickly. Lean Startup
  24. 24. ● Evolution of product design ● Takes the best of the designer’s toolkits and combines that with Agile and Lean Startup thinking ● Deeply collaborative and cross-functional Why lean UX matters
  25. 25. Lean UX An introduction.
  26. 26. Principles Lean ux principles to keep team on course
  27. 27. Team organization ● Cross functional teams ● Small, dedicated, collocated ● Self sufficient ● Empowered
  28. 28. Guide culture ● From doubt to certainty ● Outcomes, not output ● Removing waste ● Shared understanding ● No Rockstars ● Permission to fail
  29. 29. Guide process ● Small batch size ● Continuous discovery ● GOOB: the new user-centricity ● Externalizing your work ● Making over analysis ● Getting out of deliverables business
  30. 30. Lean Ux Process
  31. 31. Hypothesis Market, problem and product
  32. 32. Summary ● Assumptions ● Hypothesis ● Outcomes ● Personas
  33. 33. The main tool of outcome-focused work: The hypothesis statement. * It is also the starting point.
  34. 34. Assumptions
  35. 35. A high level declaration that is believed to be true. The act of taking for granted, or supposing a thing without proof.
  36. 36. ● As a user, I want to upload photos so that I can share content with others. ● As an administrator, I want to approve photos before they are posted so that I can make sure they are appropriate. Assumptions Examples
  37. 37. ● As a user, I want to upload photos so that I can share content with others. ● As an administrator, I want to approve photos before they are posted so that I can make sure they are appropriate. Assumptions Examples ?
  38. 38. ● Users want to share photos with others. ● Users want to share photos by uploading them to the platform. ● Administrators want to review the content uploaded to the platform. ● Administrators want to review the content by approving it before it is published. Assumptions (On user stories)
  39. 39. Some of these assumptions are wrong, and if the ones you got wrong are important enough, you are going to be out of business.
  40. 40. What can we do about our assumptions?
  41. 41. Hypothesis
  42. 42. A proposition that is presented or put forward by a scientist to explain a phenomenon. It does not become a theory until it is proved and tested under different conditions and circumstances.
  43. 43. More granular descriptions of our assumptions that targets specific areas of our product or workflow for experimentation.
  44. 44. The scientific method asks a question, forms a hypothesis, tests and generates data, analyzes and draws conclusion that either validate or refute the hypothesis Hypothesis
  45. 45. As an administrator, I want to approve photos before they are posted, so that I can make sure they are appropriate.
  46. 46. We believe that administrators want to approve the content before being published, this will result in appropriate-only content visible in the platform. We will know this is true once we observe 5 administrators testing a quick prototype and at least 3 of them mention this feature adds value to their workflow.
  47. 47. ● We don’t assume that we know what the user wants. ● We start with customer interviews to validate initial hypotheses. ● We test that hypothesis in various ways to see if we were right. Hypothesis Why is important.
  48. 48. Assumption to Hypothesis. Why validate?
  49. 49. Validation avoids spending time building a product with no value to our target market
  50. 50. Market, problem, and solution
  51. 51. The earlier you start to validate your idea, the less likely is that you will have to pivot later.
  52. 52. A market is the group of people you think might want to buy your product. Market
  53. 53. Game time! Guess the product.
  54. 54. Young professionals who want to write and tell their stories online.
  55. 55. Young professionals who want to write and tell their stories online.
  56. 56. People who have a spare room in their homes.
  57. 57. People who have a spare room in their homes.
  58. 58. If your product doesn’t solve a problem for people, then there is little chance they are going to give you money for it. Problem A problem is the reason why people are going to use your product.
  59. 59. People don’t know where to publish stories online.
  60. 60. People are concerned about safety when renting properties.
  61. 61. It is the thing that people, presumably in the target market, are going to pay your money for. Solution A product is simply the way that you’re going to solve the user’s problem.
  62. 62. Online platform to share stories you wrote with people with same interests.
  63. 63. Online platform to rent a spare rooms when I go on vacations.
  64. 64. Recap ● Market needs to be specific enough. ● Problem is needed for product to be valuable for market.. ● Solutions can be many of them, the way you solve problem is your product
  65. 65. What if there’s no time for market research? What do we do on the spirit of lean ?
  66. 66. Questions?
  67. 67. Design
  68. 68. Lean UX brings designers and non-designers together in co-creation. But it’s not design-by-committee.
  69. 69. It’s a process orchestrated and facilitated by designers, but executed by specialists in their individual discipline who share a common vision. Lean UX increases team’s ownership over their work by providing points of view shared earlier in the process. Collaborative Design
  70. 70. To test your hypothesis(assumptions) sometimes you just conduct research(interviews)
  71. 71. Other times, you need to design and build something to help test your hypothesis.
  72. 72. Team of 5-8 people ● Problem definition & constraints ● Individual Idea Generation ● Presentation and critique ● Iterate and refine (pairs) ● Team idea generation Design Studio Session
  73. 73. Braindump
  74. 74. Brainwriting
  75. 75. MVP
  76. 76. ● A product with just enough features to satisfy early customers, and to provide feedback for future development ● Build the smallest possible thing you can in order to conclusively validate or invalidate a hypothesis What is it? Minimum Viable Product
  77. 77. Minimum Viable Cake Not minimum Not viable
  78. 78. Dropbox’s MVP To attract customers
  79. 79. Dropbox’s MVP To win investors
  80. 80. Improve Existing features Kill Underperforming features Add New features
  81. 81. Recap ● Biggest risk: building something that nobody wants. ● Not launching is painful, but not learning is fatal. ● Put something in users hands and get real feedback ASAP.
  82. 82. Prototyping Communicate your ideas clearly and test.
  83. 83. A prototype is an approximation of an experience that allows to simulate what is it like to use the product or service in question.
  84. 84. ● Fake a solution instead of building. ● Create a prototype that appears real. ● 90% in 3 months vs 90% in one day. ● Storyboards cover almost everything. Prototype Is about illusion
  85. 85. ● “Perfect” to “Just Enough” ● “Long-term quality” to “Temporary simulation” Prototype mindset Changing philosophy from:
  86. 86. 1. You can prototype anything 2. Prototypes are disposable 3. Build just enough to learn, but not more. Prototype mindset Three principles
  87. 87. Prototyping techniques
  88. 88. 1. Created within an hour. 2. Easily rearranged 3. Cheap and easy to throw away 4. Fun to many people Paper prototypes Pros 1. Artificial simulation 2. Feedback limited to structure flow 3. Only useful limited audience Cons
  89. 89. 1. More realistic 2. Tests visuals and brand 3. Workflow and UI interactions can be assessed. Mid/Hi Fi Prototypes Pros 1. Some interaction can’t be tested 2. Depending on tool, it can be time-consuming 3. No real data testing Cons
  90. 90. 1. Potential for production 2. More realistic prototype to create Coded prototypes Pros 1. Time-consuming 2. Tempting to perfect the code before release 3. Updates and re-iterations can take more time Cons
  91. 91. ● Increases communication with customer on an interactive dimension. ● Ideas clearly transmitted. ● Development cost are reduced. ● Helps conduct testing. Prototype Why in Lean?
  92. 92. We got our prototype, now what?
  93. 93. We validate!
  94. 94. Validation
  95. 95. “Before your product, you have an idea. Sometimes it’s a great idea. More often, it’s a terrible idea. The important thing is that you validate your idea”
  96. 96. “Before your product, you have an idea. Sometimes it’s a great idea. More often, it’s a terrible idea. The important thing is that you validate your idea”
  97. 97. The process of confirming that a specific customer segment finds value in a product.
  98. 98. ● Don’t assume you know what the user wants. ● Do develop a hypothesis about what the user might want… ● Then, test that hypothesis to know if you were right. Validation
  99. 99. ● It helps you figure out if people would buy your product before you build it. ● It helps you find possible problems and improvements in your product before you even build it Validation Why is important in Lean UX.
  100. 100. We believe that administrators want to approve the content before being published, this will result in appropriate-only content visible in the platform. We will know this is true once we observe 5 administrators testing a quick prototype and at least 3 of them mention this feature adds value to their workflow.
  101. 101. UX Research
  102. 102. The systematic investigation of users and requirements, in order to add context and insight into the process of designing an experience.
  103. 103. Employs a variety of techniques, tools, and methodologies to reach conclusions. UX Research How to?
  104. 104. Validation Methods
  105. 105. ● Spend some time getting to know the people you are building the product for ● Ask open-ended questions and observe their behaviors. Ethnographic Studies Listening to your users
  106. 106. ● Rough approximation of your product or service. ● Gets at the heart of what it would provide. ● The goal is to understand if your product has value for the market. Concept Testing Capture the essence
  107. 107. ● Start seeing very early patterns ● After speaking with around 5 people, you can come up with some interesting hypotheses. ● Based on this, run a survey to see if patterns hold true. Surveys Find patterns
  108. 108. ● Sell Advertise the product before you build it. ○ Create a page and include CTA buttons like: “Pre-order” or “Buy”. ○ Drive traffic to the page and evaluate demand. Landing page test Pretend it’s ready
  109. 109. ● Usability testing ● A/B Testing ● Contextual Inquiries Other There are many more...
  110. 110. “There’s nothing worse than finishing a project, releasing a product, and then learning that no one wants to use it.”
  111. 111. Questions?
  112. 112. Concept vs Usability Testing Which one?
  113. 113. Usability Testing
  114. 114. Refers to evaluating a product ease of use by testing it with representative users.
  115. 115. ● Measures tasks completion ● Performance ● Navigability ● Etc... Usability Testing When?
  116. 116. An approximation of a product or service that captures the key essence (value proposition) of a new concept, feature, product in order to determine if it meets the target market needs.
  117. 117. ● Product concept ● Ad campaign ● New brand/logo Concept Testing When?
  118. 118. ● Rough illustrations ● Prototypes ● Rough print ads ● Storyboards ● Video ● Surveys Concept Testing How?
  119. 119. Concept Usability Emotions and human behavior. Task Focused Vs. Will users pay for my product/service? why/why not? Is my solution solving the problems this particular user has? Which of these two or three ideas will my users prefer? Should I continue building this product? Are my users able to complete this specific task? How long does it take to complete this specific set of tasks? How satisfied are my users with the way they accomplished their goals? How good is the performance of my product/service?
  120. 120. When you are at the beginning of a project and validating a product idea, you are miles away from proper usability testing. Product Testing From concept to usability
  121. 121. The beauty of Lean UX is that you can test almost anything, concepts on napkin to whiteboard, a quick wireframe or a fully functional prototype Testing in Lean UX Constantly testing
  122. 122. ● People aren’t good at predicting what they want ● The “Say vs. Do” problem ● Users can make up an opinion Prototype Validating
  123. 123. Concept testing gives your target audience a rough idea (essence) of your product or service and helps you understand if they would want or need such product.
  124. 124. Recap ● Concepting testing shows a rough approximation of a product idea to a market. ● Use concept testing when you have an MVP or initial hypothesis and you need validation. ● You will generate better insights by exposing your market to your idea.
  125. 125. Pivot or persevere?
  126. 126. Recap ● Lean UX? ○ Introduction & Principles ● Get going. ○ Hypothesis (assumption/problem statement) ○ Market / Personas ● Design it. ○ Collaborative design ● Build an MVP ○ Validate ○ Concept vs. Usability testing ● Research ○ Scripts and moderator tips
  127. 127. Lean UX is the evolution of product design and team collaboration. It takes the best parts of the designer’s toolkit, combines it with Agile software development and Lean Startup thinking, and makes it available to the entire product team.
  128. 128. THANK YOU.

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