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Renewable energy and maori vancouver 2014

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A keynote address delivered in Vancouver (British Columbia) in February 2014 at an International indigenous Energy Summit profiling the status of Maori development in New Zealand and the the state of government policy that is inhibiting Maori development especially in respect of related climate change and energy policy.

The paper then profile two practical Maori cases studies ( a large established 100% Maori owned geothermal development at Kawerau and a new renewable energy Maori community owned project in Te Whanau a Apanui at Omaio.

The paper ends with some of the lessons learned along the way that may provided guidance to other indigenous people of the world interested in these matters.

Publicada em: Tecnologia, Negócios
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Renewable energy and maori vancouver 2014

  1. 1. Energy (renewable) and Maori Ko te whenua te waiu mo nga uri i whakatipuranga (The land will provide sustenance for our future generations) International Indigenous Energy Summit Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada January 28th 2014 Chris Karamea Insley | Managing Director
  2. 2. January 28th, 2014 Kia ora, From the Maori people of New Zealand, we are pleased at the opportunity to have one of ‘our own’ address the first nations people of Canada and the United States and indeed, all other indigenous people of the world here today on the important issue of energy and wider related issues of sustainability of the environment and natural resources, and changing global climate. These changes will have an enduring impact on ‘our families for generations to come’. I would hope that from this discussion, there will arise opportunities for us to collaborate practically together where we have shared interests and, that at some point we may host you in our country, ‘on our lands’ to advance the discussion we have started together, today. Yours sincerely Dr. Apirana Mahuika Chairman – Tribal (Iwi) leadership Group of New Zealand (Climate Change) Chairman – Te Runanganui O Ngati Porou 2
  3. 3. Kia ora (I greet you) ….. • What is it like being Maori in New Zealand? – Maori sustainability (kaitiakitanga) values framework – Maori economy – Current New Zealand political (policy) climate and energy settings • Two Maori led Renewable energy case studies – Tuwharetoa ki Kawerau (Maori Geothermal energy) – Kaitiakitanga (Maori community-owned renewable energy) • Our message and lessons to indigenous people of the world 3
  4. 4. Our commonalities and differences • Canada and New Zealand have: – – – – – – – – Strong and long-standing relationship’s to Britain and the British monarchy; Similar Parliamentary and democratic government systems; Similar Westminster-based legal systems; Similar financial and accounting systems and conventions; Share a number of common markets; Are both metric (unlike across the border); English is the common language; and And, are becoming very multi-cultural. • But, we have in New Zealand, our differences as indigenous people; – The Treaty of Waitangi – a formal relationship signed in 1840 between the Crown and the Maori people of New Zealand – Has been (and still is today) a source of tension between Maori people and the Queen’s representative (s) – the Government. 4
  5. 5. Some quick comparative metrics Metrics New Zealand Maori Variance Population 4,242,048 526,281 12.4% Median age 38 22 58% 79.1% 20.0% 59% Median income $28,500 $22,500 21% Unemployment 7.1% 15.6% 54.5% Percent adults with formal qualification Source: 2013 New Zealand census. 5
  6. 6. Contrasting Maori/Western (Sustainability) Values Frameworks Western Values Framework Maori Values Framework Economic Strong over-riding driver of decisions (NPV, IRR, Profitability Index, Payback period etc.) Strong (NPV, IRR, Profitability Index, Payback period but may accept lower Return) Profits Owned individually and often lost offshore Owned communally (reinvested back into whanau, communities, regions and the Nation) + Social Very low (only what is prescribed in law) Very strong (What is prescribed in law is bare minimum, whanau jobs, education, health and well-being) ++ Environment Very low (only what is prescribed in law) Very strong (What is prescribed in law is bare minimum, preservation of Papatuanuki) +++ Culture Nil Very strong (Preservation of Te Reo, culture, tikanga – our identity). Planning horizon 1- 5 years Intergenerational (100 years plus) 6
  7. 7. Contrasting Maori/Western (Sustainability) Values Frameworks Western Values Framework Maori Values Framework Economic Strong over-riding driver of decisions (NPV, IRR, Profitability Index, Payback period etc.) Strong (NPV, IRR, Profitability Index, Payback period but may accept lower Return) Profits Owned individually and often lost offshore Owned communally (reinvested back into whanau, communities, regions and the Nation) + Social Very low (only what is prescribed in law) Very strong (What is prescribed in law is bare minimum, whanau jobs, education, health and well-being) ++ Environment Very low (only what is prescribed in law) Very strong (What is prescribed in law is bare minimum, preservation of Papatuanuki) +++ Culture Nil Very strong (Preservation of Te Reo, culture, tikanga – our identity). Planning horizon 1- 5 years Intergenerational (100 years plus) 7
  8. 8. The Maori economy (2010 NZ millions) Base Maori economy Diversified Maori economy Source: BERL 2010 8
  9. 9. Comparative historic GDP Growth NZ$ billions $200.0 $180.0 $160.0 $140.0 $120.0 $151.1 $100.0 $144.5 $80.0 $60.0 $108.6 $40.0 $20.0 $0.0 $9.4 $16.5 2001 2006 Maori GDP $36.9 2010 Non- Maori GDP 9
  10. 10. Comparative forecast GDP Growth NZ$ billions $900.0 $769.3 $800.0 $700.0 $600.0 $500.0 $360.0 $400.0 $300.0 $200.0 $151.1 $100.0 $36.9 $181.7 $217.9 $168.5 $313.3 $261.3 $78.9 $0.0 2010 2015 Maori 2020 2025 2030 Non-Maori 10
  11. 11. Current New Zealand climate policy a disgrace • • • • • • • • Withdrawn from Kyoto Protocol No NZ strategy to meet medium term international emission reduction targets Knowingly allowed the carbon price to collapse costing NZ tribes $NZ600 million Perverse incentives rewarding polluters $NZ100’s millions No incentives towards renewable energy But, there is a NZ election this year Opposition parties have strong emission reduction policies and support renewables A major National and International issue for Maori tribes in 2014 Source: New Zealand Herald – December 19,2013. 11
  12. 12. Case-study ONE Only 100% tribal-owned Geothermal energy company – a large (and growing) established company Tuwharetoa ki Kawerau Chris Karamea Insley Independent Board Director 12
  13. 13. Ko wai tatou? (Who are we?) Our Maori (tribal) uniqueness • Only 100% tribally owned geothermal business in New Zealand • Only geothermal business predominantly supplying process heat; • Largest geothermal process heat supplying business in the world; • Support local industry by providing geothermal energy: Our wood-processing customers – for process drying, and – for electricity • for over 50 years 13
  14. 14. Award winning Excellence in Innovation and Engineering 14
  15. 15. 7 Year Asset Growth (2005 to 2012) Our performance and growth plans 30 Value ($NZ million) • Treaty Settlement of $NZ10 million • Current net asset book value $NZ35m • Market value $NZ70m+ • 20% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) • Resource consent to double take from steam field • Strategic plan to continue growth through diversification 35 25 20 15 10 5 0 2005 2012 Value 15
  16. 16. Our diversification growth-strategy Ormat Geothermal Energy Wageningen Greenhouse 16
  17. 17. Case-study TWO Flagship Maori community-owned Renewable energy – a start-up project Kaitiakitanga | Caring for our Lands & Foreshore Chris Karamea Insley Chairman and Project Leader 17
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  20. 20. Guiding project principles and goals Guiding principles: • • • • Project leadership comes from the community (not negotiable) Never do anything that put’s our land at risk (mortgages) Find and use the best New Zealand and international experts All project intellectual property (IP) remains owned by the community Project goals: • • • • • • Cheap power for the whanau (family) through an energy company owned by the community Energy security and a new revenue stream for the community New and real jobs Model project management approaches To pilot the project towards sharing across 1,300 New Zealand marae community (estimated $NZ500 million annual electricity bill) Is real by the end of 2014. 20
  21. 21. Student Engineer Team 21
  22. 22. Winning engineering concept design 22
  23. 23. Top Commercial and Engineering teams Legal/Commercial (Chapman Tripp) • • • • • Possible Commercial Structure Owned by marae (community) Flexible to enable growth (new entities and other marae) Tax efficient Dividends back to charitable Trust for distribution to marae Interface with New Zealand Maori Land law (Te Ture Whenua Maori Land Act) Expert Engineering Advisory Panel • • • Provide independent expert engineering advice (two years) New Zealand and International expertise in Renewables Finalizing the business-case at the moment – Short term house-hold projects by end of 2014 – Major capital investment projects (2 to 5 years) 23
  24. 24. Our Partnership Strategy Investment (4) • The Hikurangi Foundation • Tyndall Foundation • Todd Foundations • Banks Engineering (4) • Engineers Without Borders • Institute of Professional Engineers of New Zealand • AECOM international • Sinclair, Knight & Merz Research (5) • Auckland University • Auckland Institute of Technology • Canterbury University • Scion Forest Research • Motu Research Legal (2) • Chapman Tripp (Law) • Maori Land Court Government (3) • Ministry for Energy • Environment Bay of Plenty • Opotiki District Council Industry Associations (2) • New Zealand Wind Energy Association • New Zealand Bio-energy Association Industry (2) • TransPower (energy) • Hancock Forest Management (forestry) Maori (multiple) • Other marae (communities) • Other tribes • Other indigenous people? 24
  25. 25. Bringing it all together ..... Energy (renewable) and Maori Summary 25
  26. 26. But, biggest oil discovery in 50 Years? $20 trillion shale oil find surrounding Coober-Pedy ‘can fuel Australia’ …. Source: Linc Energy: Released two reports in January 2013 with estimates ranging between 3.5 to 233 billion barrels. Linc aims to drill six horizontal wells (A$150-300m) to confirm its figures. 26
  27. 27. Some takeaways .. • Climate change, international policy response and growing consumer pressure will force a shift away from fossil fuels .. • Climate change is getting worse. The problem is not going away .. • The the cost of renewable energy technologies is falling .. • Renewable energy is a valid and legitimate long term investment option for indigenous people .. • Related clean-technology investment opportunity .. • Scale investment with like-minded indigenous people of the world .. 27
  28. 28. So what have we learned? • Own your own projects – leadership (not negotiable) … • Never compromise on your values – (not negotiable) this is your identity … • Take a long term (intergenerational) view – (not negotiable) avoid the socalled experts who promote short-termism … • Remember governments will come and go – avoid becoming dependent … • Find the best experts in the world to help – but you lead and manage them … • Grow your own people – education, education, education … • Strategic partnerships with those who share your values … • Reach out and collaborate with other indigenous people of the world … – – – – – Collaboration on International policy (law-making) to United Nations and other forum, Joint and shared energy (and other) project-investment, International Research and knowledge sharing, Joint marketing and indigenous branding, and Technology and Innovation. 28
  29. 29. Call anytime … Chris Karamea Insley Principal and Managing Director 37 Degrees South limited | the strategy thought leaders New Zealand International phone: +64 21 972 782 Email: ckinsley@37ds.com Skype: chris.karamea.insley Website: www.37ds.com LinkedIn: Chris Karamea Insley (send me a connect request) Twitter: Chris Karamea Insley (follow me on twitter) Facebook: Chris Karamea Insley (send me a friend request) 29

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