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Simple past

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Simple past

  1. 1. República Bolivariana de Venezuela Ministry of Popular Power for Higher Education I.U.P “Santiago Mariño” Chair: English I Simple Past Member: Pedro Rafael Lárez Cuárez C.I:29582056 Professor: Cesar Velasquez July 15, 2020
  2. 2. It is a verb tense that is used to describe actions that have happened in a past tense and that have already ended, for example: A) She cleaned her house. B) I broke the window. Both in the interrogative and in the negative form it is used as an auxiliary DID what is the past form of the verb “TO DO” and it accompanies the main verb in its infinitive form. When expressing a sentence in the Simple Past it is understood that the action is not related to the present, as we see in the following case: She lent me a book (It may have already been returned). Simple Past
  3. 3. Characteristics of the simple past 1) Indicates the action performed at a specific moment in the past. 2) The main verb of the sentence is always in the past tense. 3) It has a simple composition of "subject and predicate verb". 4) It is the only grammatical tense that uses verbs in the past tense. 5) In the predicate expressions that determine the time of the sentence can be used, although it will always be the verb that indicates whether or not the sentence is in the past tense.
  4. 4. use of the simple past The simple past has several uses. Let's see some: 1) It is used to talk about actions that were done in the past and that have already ended. 2) It can be used to describe a series of actions in the past. 3) You can use it to talk about repeated or habitual actions in the past. 4) To talk about generalities or facts of the past. 5) It is used for narrations or actions that occur over long periods of time.
  5. 5. ¿What are regular verbs? Are the simplest to conjugate since their spelling in simple past or past participle is the same as in the present tense by adding a "d" or "ed." at the end. For example: Arrive/ arrived , Call/ Called. If the verb ends in a consonant + "y", we change the "y" to "i" and add "ed". For example: Marry/ Married, Study/ Studied. If the verb ends in "e", we simply add a "d". For example: Hate/ Hated, Like/ Liked Regular verbs
  6. 6. ¿What are irregular verbs? They are those that do not follow the basic rule since each one has its form in infinitive, past and participle. Irregular verbs can have different endings that we group briefly like this: Verbs whose past tense and participle are the same: Dormir: sleep, slept, slept Verbs with exactly the same forms: Cortar: cut, cut, cut Verbs with totally different forms: Escribir: write, wrote, written Irregular verbs
  7. 7. Simple Past Affirmation When we are going to make an affirmation with the simple past we need to follow the formula: Subject + verb in simple past tense + complement Examples: Did they live in Washington? Did the dog play with the ball? Simple Past Denial To deny something in the past, the formula we use is a little different. This time we are going to make use of the Did auxiliary. Subject + did not (didn’t) + main verb in infinitive + predicate Examples: They didn’t live in Washington The dog didn’t play with the ball
  8. 8. Affirmative Interrogation in Simple Past For an interrogation in the past we have to use the Did auxiliary. Follow the formula: Did + subject + main verb in infinitive + complement Examples: Did they live in Washington? Did the dog play with the ball? Negative Simple Past Interrogation Negative interrogations are used when the person who is speaking wants to express surprise or wants to assume something. In this case we can use the following formulas: Informal: Didn’t + subject + main verb in infinitive + complement Formal: Did + subject + not + main verb in infinitive + complement
  9. 9. Answers to interrogative sentences A sentence that begins with the Did auxiliary only supports 2 types of answer: YES or No. They must therefore follow the following form: If the answer is yes: Yes, S + Did. Where, Yes equals S; S, is the subject of the sentence; Did is the helper we use to ask. If the answer is negative: No, S + did not. Where, No equals No; S is the subject of the sentence; Didn't, is the negative form of the helper we use to ask. Examples Did Nancy eat bread? Yes, she did/ No, she Didn’ t. Did they live in Madrid? Yes, they did/ No, they didn’ t.

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