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NISO Webinar: Net Neutrality:
Will Library Resources
be stuck in the Slow Lane?
Wednesday, January 14, 2015
Speakers:
Larr...
Network Neutrality
Principles and Policy for Libraries
NISO Webinar January 14, 2015
Larra Clark, Deputy Director
ALA Offi...
Overview
1/14/20153
 Network neutrality definitions and history
 Key policy issues at play
 Political landscape
 Libra...
Network neutrality, defined
The principle that Internet service providers
(ISPs) and governments should treat all
informat...
A little history…
 Communications Act of 1934
 Title II Common Carriage
 Telecommunications Act of 1996
 Section 706 A...
Internet Policy Principles (2005)
1/14/20156
 Consumers are entitled to access the lawful Internet
content of their choic...
A little (more) history…
 BitTorrent and Comcast (2008)
 Comcast Corp v. FCC (2010)
 Open Internet Order (2010)
 Veriz...
Current policy debate
 Need for regulation at all
 Legal authority and level of regulation
 Impact of regulation on inn...
Politics
 GOP House tried to roll back 2010 Open Internet
Order; stopped in the Senate
 President Obama ran on a platfor...
Libraries & Higher Education
 American Library Association, Association of Research
Libraries and EDUCAUSE have long coll...
Network Neutrality Principles (7/2014)
 Prohibit Blocking
 Protect Against Unreasonable Discrimination
 Prohibit Paid P...
Libraries & Higher Education
 Advocacy efforts
 Public Comments to FCC
 Reject proposed “commercially reasonable” stand...
Library & Higher Education Needs
 Definitions matter
 Ombudsman/advocate for libraries and higher
education matters
 Wh...
Protecting an Open Internet
1/14/201514
“We need a watchful eye to ensure that network
providers do not become Internet ga...
What’s Next
 FCC plans to vote on issue February 26, 2015
 Title II reclassification with forbearance?
 Congress consid...
Resources
 FCC Open Internet website:
http://www.fcc.gov/openinternet
 ALA Web page devoted to topic:
http://www.ala.org...
Network Neutrality
The Public Library Perspective
NISO Webinar January 14, 2015
Holly Carroll, Director
Poudre River Publi...
Public Library Mission
• Bring people and information together
• Democratic principle of free and equal access
to informat...
Today’s Public Library
• Ubiquitous Internet
• Digital information from content providers
• Digital content creation
• Onl...
Communities expect
• High speed connections for:
– Downloading of digital content (eBooks, music,
research databases, digi...
Communities Expect
• High speed connections for:
– Homework assignments
– Life long-learning
– Job searching
– Economic De...
Prioritized Internet Access
• Higher service charges for Internet connections
and for online information services
• Within...
Rural Libraries
• Internet access can bridge geographic
disadvantages in accessing information,
programming, educational o...
Remote Library Users
• End-user would have slower access to library
on-line services making use of databases,
catalog, dow...
Poudre River Public Library District
• Serves both urban and rural communities that have
limited or no access to broadband...
Network Neutrality: An
Academic Library Perspective
NISO Webinar January 14, 2015
Jonathan Miller
jxmiller@rollins.edu
Jon...
What she said …
• Most of what Holly said about public libraries
is true for college and university libraries as
well:
• A...
Talk to your CIO
• Academic libraries are embedded in larger
institutions.
• The university CIO is the key decision maker
...
Libraries as consumers and producers
• Library users generate a huge amount of internet
traffic with fulltext databases, o...
Cloud Based Services
• Changing model of services.
• Not just content that is served from 3rd party
vendors.
• Operational...
Talk to your vendors
• What are their plans to deliver reliable service
under a priority access model?
• Are they reliant ...
No library is an island …
• Our students and faculty live rich, interconnected,
information lives.
• We have no monopoly o...
What can you do?
• Contact your congressional representatives
• Act when ALA and ACRL ask you to speak up
on this issue.
•...
NISO Webinar • January 14, 2015
Questions?
All questions will be posted with presenter answers on
the NISO website followi...
Thank you for joining us today.
Please take a moment to fill out the brief online survey.
We look forward to hearing from ...
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Jan 14 NISO Webinar Net Neutrality: Will Library Resources be stuck in the Slow Lane?

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Jan 14 NISO Webinar
Net Neutrality: Will Library Resources be stuck in the Slow Lane?
About the Webinar

Net Neutrality is an issue that has been increasingly in the news, but it is something that has affected libraries for a lot longer. Many public libraries are in underserved communities where patrons may not have personal access to the internet, so the use of the public libraries' resources is critical for them. Without net neutrality, those public libraries may not be able to cost-effectively provide such Internet service. For the scholarly and academic communities, scholarly resources could be resigned to the slow lane of the net, if content providers and libraries don't have the resources to pay for the "fast lane." As resources increasingly go multimedia, requiring greater bandwidth, will libraries and content platform providers be saddled with taking on added costs to ensure reliable access?

Net neutrality begins with the basic idea that the Internet is a fair and democratic platform for all. Organizations such as the American Library Association, the Association of Research Libraries, EDUCAUSE, and Internet2, among others, have spoken out about the critical need for retaining net neutrality in the library, higher education, and research communities.

In this webinar, presenters will help define Net Neutrality, what could happen without it, and how it can impact public and academic libraries, and the wider information community.

Agenda

Introduction
Todd Carpenter, Executive Director, NISO

Network Neutrality Principles and Policy for Libraries & Higher Education
Larra Clark, Deputy Director, Office for Information Technology Policy, American Library Association

Network neutrality: The Public Library Perspective
Holly Carroll, Executive Director, Poudre River Public Library District

Academic Libraries and Net Neutrality
Jonathan Miller, Library Director, Olin Library of Rollins College

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Jan 14 NISO Webinar Net Neutrality: Will Library Resources be stuck in the Slow Lane?

  1. 1. NISO Webinar: Net Neutrality: Will Library Resources be stuck in the Slow Lane? Wednesday, January 14, 2015 Speakers: Larra Clark, Deputy Director, Office for Information Technology Policy, American Library Association Holly Carroll, Executive Director, Poudre River Public Library District Jonathan Miller, Library Director, Olin Library of Rollins College http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/webinars/net_neutrality/
  2. 2. Network Neutrality Principles and Policy for Libraries NISO Webinar January 14, 2015 Larra Clark, Deputy Director ALA Office for Information Technology Policy
  3. 3. Overview 1/14/20153  Network neutrality definitions and history  Key policy issues at play  Political landscape  Library & higher education-specific advocacy  Likely next steps
  4. 4. Network neutrality, defined The principle that Internet service providers (ISPs) and governments should treat all information on the Internet equally—not discriminating or charging differently by user, content, website, platform, application or mode of communication.* --Columbia University Law Professor Tim Wu (2003) (*Reasonable network management is allowed as long as such actions are taken in a content-neutral manner.) 1/14/20154
  5. 5. A little history…  Communications Act of 1934  Title II Common Carriage  Telecommunications Act of 1996  Section 706 Advanced Telecommunications Incentives  Broadband as an “Information Service” or “Telecommunications Service”? 1/14/20155
  6. 6. Internet Policy Principles (2005) 1/14/20156  Consumers are entitled to access the lawful Internet content of their choice  Consumers are entitled to run applications and services of their choice (subject to needs of law enforcement)  Consumers are entitled to connect their choice of legal devices that do not harm the network; and  Consumers are entitled to competition among network providers, application and service providers, and content providers.
  7. 7. A little (more) history…  BitTorrent and Comcast (2008)  Comcast Corp v. FCC (2010)  Open Internet Order (2010)  Verizon Communications Inc. v. FCC (2014)  FCC Rulemaking on Preserving and Protecting the Open Internet (2014) 1/14/20157
  8. 8. Current policy debate  Need for regulation at all  Legal authority and level of regulation  Impact of regulation on innovation and investment  Need for clarity and certainty 1/14/20158
  9. 9. Politics  GOP House tried to roll back 2010 Open Internet Order; stopped in the Senate  President Obama ran on a platform that supported network neutrality  Congress split along mostly along party lines  Internet Service Providers generally oppose net; digital content providers and consumer groups generally support 1/14/20159
  10. 10. Libraries & Higher Education  American Library Association, Association of Research Libraries and EDUCAUSE have long collaborated on this issue  In 2014, many more higher education and library voices joined:  American Association of Community Colleges (AACC)  American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU)  American Council on Education (ACE)  Association of American Universities (AAU)  Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)  Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU)  Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA)  Modern Language Association (MLA)  National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) 1/14/201510
  11. 11. Network Neutrality Principles (7/2014)  Prohibit Blocking  Protect Against Unreasonable Discrimination  Prohibit Paid Prioritization  Prevent Degradation  Enable Reasonable Network Management  Provide Transparency  Continue Capacity-Based Pricing of Broadband Internet Access Connections  Adopt Enforceable Policies  Accommodate Public Safety  Maintain Status Quo on Private Networks 1/14/201511
  12. 12. Libraries & Higher Education  Advocacy efforts  Public Comments to FCC  Reject proposed “commercially reasonable” standard; introduce idea of “Internet Reasonable”  Meetings with FCC staff and commissioners  Meetings with other stakeholder groups—from the Center for Democracy & Technology to AT&T  Media outreach  Education among our members 1/14/201512
  13. 13. Library & Higher Education Needs  Definitions matter  Ombudsman/advocate for libraries and higher education matters  Who decides matters 1/14/201513
  14. 14. Protecting an Open Internet 1/14/201514 “We need a watchful eye to ensure that network providers do not become Internet gatekeepers, with the ability to dictate who can use the Internet and for what purpose.” (2005) “To expect openness, transparency, non-discrimination and consumer protections to evolve from strictly private management of our nation’s critical information infrastructure is to expect what never was or ever will be.” (2010) --Former FCC Commissioner Michael Copps
  15. 15. What’s Next  FCC plans to vote on issue February 26, 2015  Title II reclassification with forbearance?  Congress considering legislative options  Ban paid prioritization?  Add new section to Telecommunications Act?  Threaten FCC funding through appropriations process  Congressional Review Act  LOTS more media coverage and lobbying  Likely legal challenge to FCC rules, if adopted 1/14/201515
  16. 16. Resources  FCC Open Internet website: http://www.fcc.gov/openinternet  ALA Web page devoted to topic: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/telecom/netneutrality  District Dispatch blog (sign up!): http://www.districtdispatch.org/category/network- neutrality/  Congressional Research Service: Access to Broadband Networks: The Network Neutrality Debate (November 11, 2014) 1/14/201516
  17. 17. Network Neutrality The Public Library Perspective NISO Webinar January 14, 2015 Holly Carroll, Director Poudre River Public Library District
  18. 18. Public Library Mission • Bring people and information together • Democratic principle of free and equal access to information for all • An Open Internet is a right for everyone, not for those who can afford it.
  19. 19. Today’s Public Library • Ubiquitous Internet • Digital information from content providers • Digital content creation • Online services (library card registration, virtual reference, HR and financial applications, eGovernment) • Public Access to computers • Broadband access and wireless connections
  20. 20. Communities expect • High speed connections for: – Downloading of digital content (eBooks, music, research databases, digital audio) – Streaming Internet sites (YouTube ,lynda.com, hoopla) – Distance learning (Sacramento’s Public Library’s high school diploma class) – On-line Testing – Video conferencing – Group presentation/real-time collaboration
  21. 21. Communities Expect • High speed connections for: – Homework assignments – Life long-learning – Job searching – Economic Development (small businesses, entrepreneurs)
  22. 22. Prioritized Internet Access • Higher service charges for Internet connections and for online information services • Within context of constrained budgets • Less purchase power for digital content or other service tradeoffs such as less staffing, print materials, hours of operation.
  23. 23. Rural Libraries • Internet access can bridge geographic disadvantages in accessing information, programming, educational opportunities • Are often the only free public internet access point • May be the only source for high speed, broadband connection in community • “When you don’t have that access, it’s like you’re held back in time and the world goes on without you,” Kristie Kirkpatrick, Whitman County Library
  24. 24. Remote Library Users • End-user would have slower access to library on-line services making use of databases, catalog, downloading of digital content frustrating and time-consuming
  25. 25. Poudre River Public Library District • Serves both urban and rural communities that have limited or no access to broadband or Internet access • Mobile computer lab, digital literacy classes to rural areas and low-income neighborhoods where there is no public Internet access • 100Mbps in all libraries provided by academic/city fiber network. • Wireless from Comcast • Joint-use library with a community college
  26. 26. Network Neutrality: An Academic Library Perspective NISO Webinar January 14, 2015 Jonathan Miller jxmiller@rollins.edu Jonathan Miller, Rollins College. This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
  27. 27. What she said … • Most of what Holly said about public libraries is true for college and university libraries as well: • Academic freedom and free, equal access. • Heavily digital operations. • Both consumers and producers of digital information. • Users with high expectations. Jonathan Miller, Rollins College. This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
  28. 28. Talk to your CIO • Academic libraries are embedded in larger institutions. • The university CIO is the key decision maker when it comes to Internet access on campus. • The CIO pays the bills and takes the heat. • EDUCAUSE is a key organization for CIOs. • The issues of cloud-based computing, heavy internet traffic are not just library issues. Jonathan Miller, Rollins College. This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
  29. 29. Libraries as consumers and producers • Library users generate a huge amount of internet traffic with fulltext databases, online journals, e- books, streaming video, from 3rd party vendors – EBSCO, ProQuest, Gale-Cengage, etc. • We also serve up increasingly large amounts of traffic from institutional repositories, digital archives, etc. • Land Grant missions, extension services, OA and EOR Jonathan Miller, Rollins College. This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
  30. 30. Cloud Based Services • Changing model of services. • Not just content that is served from 3rd party vendors. • Operational services – circulation, cataloging, e- resource management, ILL, repositories, all moving to the cloud and thus dependent upon the Internet connection. • Not just a library issue, it is a higher education issue. • Who decides? The university or the ISP Jonathan Miller, Rollins College. This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
  31. 31. Talk to your vendors • What are their plans to deliver reliable service under a priority access model? • Are they reliant on commodity network connections, or are they connected to LambdaRail? • Have they and the associations they belong to taken a position on net neutrality? Jonathan Miller, Rollins College. This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
  32. 32. No library is an island … • Our students and faculty live rich, interconnected, information lives. • We have no monopoly on information. • We will be judged in relationship to major players on the commercial Internet. • The fastest computer speed you have experienced in the past is the slowest speed you will accept in the future. • Priority access will reward established players and punish new entrants and diverse voices. Jonathan Miller, Rollins College. This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
  33. 33. What can you do? • Contact your congressional representatives • Act when ALA and ACRL ask you to speak up on this issue. • Talk to your CIO and your Provost • Talk to your vendors. • Talk to students and particularly faculty -- they are members of educational associations with voices in Washington. Jonathan Miller, Rollins College. This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
  34. 34. NISO Webinar • January 14, 2015 Questions? All questions will be posted with presenter answers on the NISO website following the webinar: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/webinars/net_neutrality/ NISO Webinar Net Neutrality: Will Library Resources be stuck in the Slow Lane?
  35. 35. Thank you for joining us today. Please take a moment to fill out the brief online survey. We look forward to hearing from you! THANK YOU

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