O slideshow foi denunciado.
Seu SlideShare está sendo baixado. ×

What We Say WITHOUT Words: A Workshop on Nonverbal Communication

Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Carregando em…3
×

Confira estes a seguir

1 de 22 Anúncio

What We Say WITHOUT Words: A Workshop on Nonverbal Communication

Baixar para ler offline

Corporate citizenship often requires you to influence colleagues and community partners. You have honed your program messages, but have you thought about the other messages you may be conveying?

Audiences extract meaning from both non-verbal and verbal symbols: Stance, eye contact, gestures, vocal quality and inflection, pitch, pace, use of pauses, linguistic choices, and so forth. Presenters typically give less thought to non-verbal communication than to message content, even though non-verbal symbols often carry as much—or more—meaning.

This interactive workshop focuses on how we express our ideas, with particular attention to non-verbal messaging. Through exercises and discussion, participants will:

be able to identify visual and vocal symbols that communicate confidence and authority;
understand the capacity of non-verbal messages to enhance and strengthen the verbal message or, alternatively, to contradict and obscure the message; and
identify linguistic strategies that advance the speaker's goals.

Speakers:
Moderator: Nancy Dunbar, Teaching Fellow, Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship

Corporate citizenship often requires you to influence colleagues and community partners. You have honed your program messages, but have you thought about the other messages you may be conveying?

Audiences extract meaning from both non-verbal and verbal symbols: Stance, eye contact, gestures, vocal quality and inflection, pitch, pace, use of pauses, linguistic choices, and so forth. Presenters typically give less thought to non-verbal communication than to message content, even though non-verbal symbols often carry as much—or more—meaning.

This interactive workshop focuses on how we express our ideas, with particular attention to non-verbal messaging. Through exercises and discussion, participants will:

be able to identify visual and vocal symbols that communicate confidence and authority;
understand the capacity of non-verbal messages to enhance and strengthen the verbal message or, alternatively, to contradict and obscure the message; and
identify linguistic strategies that advance the speaker's goals.

Speakers:
Moderator: Nancy Dunbar, Teaching Fellow, Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship

Anúncio
Anúncio

Mais Conteúdo rRelacionado

Semelhante a What We Say WITHOUT Words: A Workshop on Nonverbal Communication (20)

Anúncio

Mais de Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship (20)

Mais recentes (20)

Anúncio

What We Say WITHOUT Words: A Workshop on Nonverbal Communication

  1. 1. WORKSHOP: What We Say WITHOUT Words: A Workshop on Nonverbal Communication Moderator: Nancy Dunbar, Teaching Fellow, Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship Hosted by
  2. 2. She stole my book
  3. 3. SHE stole my book. She STOLE my book. She stole MY book. She stole my BOOK. She stole my book?
  4. 4. What to do to die today at a minute or two til two A thing distinctly hard to say but harder still to do Would be to tattoo a ra-ta-tat-too At a minute or two til two today At a minute or two til two.
  5. 5. She stood upon the balcony inimitably mimicking him hiccupping and amicably welcoming him in again.
  6. 6. PITCH
  7. 7. PITCH BCCCC Conference description: Hundreds of CSR professionals join us each year to explore the environmental, social and governance aspects of business. Our Conference is unique in the fact we only allow corporate citizenship practitioners to attend. This allows for a safe, collaborative, and supportive environment for attendees to share ideas and brainstorm solutions to everyday problems. You will return to your organization with detail-rich case studies, practical know-how and specific implementation tips to accelerate your business success.
  8. 8. TONE
  9. 9. TONE Imagine that you’ve seen something very exciting and want to share the experience with a friend. You call your friend and describe what you’ve seen. . . . . . but you can only use the words “peanut butter.”
  10. 10. TONE Still speaking in “peanut butter,” change the emotion to: •Consoling •Congratulating •Start with happy and go to sad •Start with sad and go to happy
  11. 11. TONE Express belief/disbelief with the following: • You’ll never regret buying one of these. • This extended warranty is a great deal. • This is definitely a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. • This is the best work I’ve ever done. • I’m the best at what I do.
  12. 12. VOLUME
  13. 13. VOLUME LATimes: Why there’s a statue of a fearless girl . . . Wall Street visitors and tourists will notice a new addition if they're walking down Broadway in New York this week. About 20 feet across from the famous Charging Bull statue — a symbol of Wall Street's strength and might that has loomed over the street since 1989 — a bronze statue of a girl stands facing it, hands on hips, a defiant expression on her face.
  14. 14. The temporary statue — named “Fearless Girl” and placed overnight Monday by McCann New York advertising agency and its client, Boston-based State Street Global Advisors — may be a stunt to draw attention to the index fund giant's campaign to get more women into board roles against the backdrop of International Women's Day and the anniversary of the launch of an exchange-traded fund that tracks companies that have higher levels of gender diversity in its leadership.
  15. 15. PACE
  16. 16. PACE . . . and putting it all together Mary Fisher, 1992 Republican Convention Less than three months ago at platform hearings in Salt Lake City, I asked the Republican Party to lift the shroud of silence which has been draped over the issue of HIV and AIDS. I have come tonight to bring our silence to an end. I bear a message of challenge, not self-congratulation. I want your attention, not your applause.
  17. 17. I would never have asked to be HIV positive, but I believe that in all things there is a purpose; and I stand before you and before the nation gladly. The reality of AIDS is brutally clear. Two hundred thousand Americans are dead or dying. A million more are infected. Worldwide, forty million, sixty million, or a hundred million infections will be counted in the coming few years. But despite science and research, White House meetings, and congressional hearings, despite good intentions and bold initiatives, campaign slogans, and hopeful promises, it is -- despite it all -- the epidemic which is winning tonight.
  18. 18. JFK: Houston Ministerial Association, 1960 Reverend Meza, Reverend Reck, I'm grateful for your generous invitation to speak my views. While the so-called religious issue is necessarily and properly the chief topic here tonight, I want to emphasize from the outset that we have far more critical issues to face in the 1960 election; the spread of Communist influence, until it now festers 90 miles off the coast of Florida--the humiliating treatment of our President and Vice President by those who no longer respect our power--the hungry children I saw in West Virginia, the old people who cannot pay their doctor bills, the families forced to give up their farms--an America with too many slums, with too few schools, and too late to the moon and outer space.
  19. 19. This is the kind of America I believe in--and this is the kind I fought for in the South Pacific, and the kind my brother died for in Europe. No one suggested then that we may have a "divided loyalty," that we did "not believe in liberty," or that we belonged to a disloyal group that threatened the "freedoms for which our forefathers died." And in fact this is the kind of America for which our forefathers died-- when they fled here to escape religious test oaths that denied office to members of less favored churches--when they fought for the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom--and when they fought at the shrine I visited today, the Alamo. For side by side with Bowie and Crockett died McCafferty and Bailey and Carey--but no one knows whether they were Catholic or not. For there was no religious test at the Alamo.
  20. 20. MLK: I Have a Dream, 1963 In a sense we've come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds."
  21. 21. But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we've come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.
  22. 22. SPEAKING IN YOUR OWN VOICE Introduce your CSR program to a group of new employees. or You are bright and talented. You could be doing lots of things. You are in a job that is demanding and difficult. Explain why you are committed to the CSR profession. Before you speak, make a note of two items: 1. what you want the audience to remember. 2. what you want the audience to feel.

Notas do Editor

  • Intentionally blank
  • Intentionally blank
  • Intentionally blank

×