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Training Manual - 2011 - Reconciling Ministries

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The Called to Witness five year campaign trained United Methodists in community organizing, public narrative, and political strategy. This training manual includes the materials used in the fifty training events given during the final year of the campaign.

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Training Manual - 2011 - Reconciling Ministries

  1. 1. Training Manual and Campaign Guide 2011 – 2012
  2. 2. [1] TABLE OF CONTENTS: CAMPAIGN GOALS...............................................................................................................................................................2 TALKING POINTS FOR CHANGED HEARTS.............................................................................................................................3 TRAINING SECTION:.............................................................................................................................................................5 SKILL BUILDING: ONE TO ONE MEETINGS..........................................................................................................................................6 EXERCISE #1 – ONE-TO-ONE SKILL BUILDING: ......................................................................................................................8 RELATIONAL ORGANIZING: STORYTELLING WITH A PURPOSE .................................................................................................................9 EXERCISE#2 – STORY OF SELF.............................................................................................................................................11 THE STORY OF US.......................................................................................................................................................................13 THE STORY OF NOW ...................................................................................................................................................................14 TRANSITIONS: WEAVING TOGETHER OUR STORIES: ..........................................................................................................15 EXERCISE #3 – SELF, US, NOW:..........................................................................................................................................16 COMMITMENT TO ACTION:..........................................................................................................................................................18 RESOURCES AND APPENDICES:..........................................................................................................................................19 THE HISTORY OF CALLED TO WITNESS CAMPAIGN.............................................................................................................................20 UMC 101................................................................................................................................................................................21 MFSA 101...............................................................................................................................................................................22 AFFIRMATION 101 .....................................................................................................................................................................24 RMN 101................................................................................................................................................................................26 RECONCILING CONGREGATIONS 101..............................................................................................................................................27 GENERAL CONFERENCE 101.........................................................................................................................................................28 LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR MISSION TRIP TO TAMPA: VOLUNTEERING AT GENERAL CONFERENCE .................................................................29 JURISDICTIONAL CONFERENCE 101................................................................................................................................................29 COMMON WITNESS COALITION 101..............................................................................................................................................30 COMMON WITNESS CENTRAL CONFERENCES PLAN...........................................................................................................................31 HELPFUL RESOURCES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY........................................................................................................................................32 RMN LEGISLATIVE GOALS............................................................................................................................................................33 MFSA’S LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES FOR GC 2012 ..............................................................................................................................35 HELPFUL PREPARATION AND NOTES FOR DELEGATE MEETINGS:..........................................................................................................36 JURISDICTIONAL ORAGNIZERS AND CAMPAIGN STAFF:.......................................................................................................................38 CAMPAIGN LEADERSHIP DIRECTORY .................................................................................................................................39 JURISDICTIONAL ORAGNIZERS AND CAMPAIGN STAFF:.......................................................................................................................39 They were all filled with the Holy Spirit and spoke the word of God with boldness. ~Acts 4:31b
  3. 3. [2] CAMPAIGN GOALS In the final year of the Called to Witness Campaign, United Methodists from across our connection will engage in Holy Conferencing with General Conference delegates. Beginning in August of 2011, we will seek to obey Jesus’ command to “love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31) by telling our stories and building relationships with United Methodists from every walk of life and theological position. Together, Methodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) Chapters, Affirmation members and Reconciling Ministries Network (RMN) Annual Conference Teams (collectively referred to as ACTs) in fifty four Annual Conference areas will recruit, support and coach Love Your Neighbor volunteers who will learn to tell their stories and build relationships with General Conference delegates. CAMPAIGN GOALS: • Impact General Conference to vote for inclusive language in the 2012 Book of Discipline • Tell our stories & build relationships • Strengthen Annual Conference Teams (ACTs) • Grow Our Movement CAMPAIGN OUTCOMES: 1 Fully Inclusive United Methodist Church 25 Jurisdictional Organizers to train and coach volunteers 54 Trainings hosted by RMN-ACTs and MFSA Chapters 606 US delegates to the 2012 UMC General Conference will each be contacted by two Love Your Neighbor volunteers 1212 Storytelling meetings between delegates and Love Your Neighbor volunteers 1500 United Methodists trained to have Holy Conversations through storytelling, intentional listening, and one-to-one meeting skills CAMPAIGN ACTIONS: In order to accomplish these goals, we will: • Train United Methodists to tell their stories and build relationships • Empower Love Your Neighbor volunteers to tell their stories and build relationships with general conference delegates • Gather during General Conference to pray, celebrate and support one another • Build relationships with people within and opposed to our movement • Strengthen Annual Conference Teams • Work in coalition with common witness partners
  4. 4. [3] TALKING POINTS FOR CHANGED HEARTS Love God’s People—All God’s People • The love of Jesus Christ is for all (John 3:16). • Our call is to love our neighbor (Luke 10:27) • Jesus talked to and taught women (Luke 10: 38-42, John 4:1-41) • Jesus ministered to his enemy—the Roman Centurion (Matthew 8:5-13, John 4:46-54). • Jesus ate with tax collectors (Matthew 9:10-13) • Jesus ministers to his critics—the Pharisee whose daughter was dying (Mark 5: 21-24, 35-43) • Jesus says he has other sheep that we don’t know about (John 10:16) • God says that if we love God and neighbor we are God’s people. (John 13:35, 1 John 2:9-10) • Everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another. (John 13:35). • The unity of the Church comes from God. (Ephesians 2:13-18). • Unity is based on faith and love of neighbor with all our differences. (1 Corinthians 12:12-26). Do not Judge / Trust God • Jesus is always inspiring the church to love. (1 John 4: 11-12). • Jesus calls us to love all, particularly those who are different. (Matthew 22:39). • Whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life and will not be judged. (John 4:24) • God looked at creation and said, “It is good.” We love God’s good creation. (Genesis 1:31). • If it is from God, you will not be able to stop them; you will be fighting against God. (Acts 5:39). • “I tell you,” he replied, “if they keep quiet, the stones will cry out.” (Luke 19:40) • “Do not call anything impure that God has made clean.” (Acts 10:15 and 10:32) • Do not judge, and you will not be judged. (Luke 6:37) (Matthew 7:1) (Romans 14:3) • Why do you look at the speck in your neighbor’s eye and ignore the branch in your own? (Matthew 7:3) • I did not come to judge the world but to save the world. (John 12:47) • Therefore judge nothing before the appoint time; wait until the Lord comes. (1 Corinthians 4:5) The Word of God Changes Hearts • Paul changed his heart about Jesus on the Road to Damascus. (Acts 9) • Peter changed his heart about Gentiles. (Acts 10:32) • Phillip changed his heart about the Ethiopian eunuch. (Acts 8: 26-40) • Jesus asked people to accept—even admire—Samaritans who were scorned. (Luke 10:25-37). • Jesus said love your neighbor—even the ones you don’t want to love. (Luke 6:27). • Nicodemus, a Pharisee, changed his heart and was at the tomb of Jesus. (3 John 19:39) Our Wesleyan and Protestant traditions call us to side with God’s people: • Baptism calls us to love our children, not to judge or reject them. • “Open Hearts, Open Minds and Open Doors” -- hearts, minds and doors are opening! • Ten million Christians are now part of denominations with open doors. • Methodists followed the Holy Spirit when laity began serving as delegates in 1903—when women were ordained in 1956—when segregation was lifted in 1968.
  5. 5. [4] • John Wesley: “In essentials, unity. In non-essentials, liberty. In all things, charity.” • John Wesley said in his sermon, “The Character of a Methodist,” “But as to all opinions which do not strike at the root of Christianity, we think and let think.” • We practice an open communion table – it is our job to be agents of grace, not judgment. Love Your Neighbor – God is Love • Luke 10:25-37 And behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” He said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” And Jesus said to him, “You have answered correctly; do this, and you will live.” But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” • Leviticus 19:18 You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against the sons of your own people, but you shall love your neighbor as yourself: I am the Lord. • Matthew 22:36-40 “Teacher, which is the great commandment in the Law?” And Jesus said to him, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment. And a second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. On these two commandments depend all the Law and the Prophets.” • Romans 13:8-10 “Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfilling of the law. • Matthew 7:12 So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets. • 1 John 4:16 So we have come to know and to believe the love that God has for us. God is love, and whoever abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him. • Mark 12:31 The second is this: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” There is no other commandment greater than these. • Matthew 22:34-40 But when the Pharisees heard that he had silenced the Sadducees, they gathered together. And one of them, a lawyer, asked him a question to test him. “Teacher, which is the great commandment in the Law?” And he said to him, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment.” • Romans 13:9 The commandments…are summed up in this word: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”
  6. 6. [5] TRAINING SECTION: SAMPLE AGENDA FOR TRAINING (may be modified for individual Annual Conferences) 10:00 Introductions Overview of Day & Agenda Community Covenant 10:20 Campaign and Coalition Plans Primary message and talking points 10:35 Skill Building: One-To-One Meetings Relationship Building and Organizing 10:50 Exercise #1: One-to-One Meeting 11:30 General Conference Organizing Coalition Plans Annual Conference Plans 11:45 Plan Meetings with Delegates 12:00 Lunch 12:30 Skill Building: Advanced Storytelling Story of Self 12:40 Exercise #2: Storytelling 1:05 Story of Us & Now Putting it all together 1:20 Exercise #3: Combined stories Debrief 1:50 Action Planning Meeting with Delegates Other Actions and ACT contact information 2:20 Conclusions Other resources Evaluations Commissioning 2:30 Adjourn
  7. 7. [6] SKILL BUILDING: ONE TO ONE MEETINGS One on one meetings are the key to building and sustaining successful relationships and organizations. By talking with someone, one on one, we learn their story, unlock their passion and discover values that we share. These shared values become the basis for working together to create change. We should think of one on one meetings as tools we will use throughout our work – to invite people to trainings, to call new leaders onto our teams and share our stories with delegates. One on One Meetings are: Scheduled – not accidental. Leaders initiate relationships with others. Purposeful – not chit-chat. Leaders initiate one to one meetings for the purpose of finding common values and interests. Intentional – not casual or haphazard. One to one meetings establish a public relationship for public work together. Probing – not prying. One to one meetings help participants discover each other’s interests and stories when participants exchange many “why?” questions. A SAMPLE PLAN FOR YOUR ONE TO ONE MEETING: • Begin and end in prayer. Share the prayer time. One of you should open in prayer, the other close. Pray for things such as understanding, openness, justice, inclusion, love and the Church. • Remind the representative you want to discuss three things: (1) sharing why you are UM (2) what it means to be UM, and (3) the challenges the Church faces at the upcoming General Conference. • Share your Story of Self and then ask, “Why are you a United Methodist?” • Share your Story of Us and ask, “What is important to you about being United Methodist?” • Share your Story of Now and ask the representative to vote for full inclusion. • Respond gently: thank them if they say they support full inclusion. If they are not sure they can support full inclusion, ask them to pray about it and offer them resources to help guide their discernment. • Affirm your appreciation for a church that is diverse enough to include both of you. • Thank your representative. Express your gratitude for your time together. • Remember to close in prayer.
  8. 8. [7] IMPORTANT GUIDELINES AND TIPS • As you plan your one-to-one consider what you might already share with the delegate, the way you will tell your story, and how you will ask them to respond. • Practice your story with a friend, and decide ahead of time how much time you have for each of the three parts of the conversation and gently move the conversation along by saying something like, “I’m mindful of time and want to cover the three things I mentioned. Can we move on?” • Be Polite. Remember that this is a conversation to build a relationship. • Keep your tone of voice as open as your heart. Don’t shout. • Be sure to use “I” statements. Avoid assuming you know where the representative stands. • Remember this is not a debate. You are not here to argue or intellectually persuade the representative. • Tell your story and invite them to join you in the movement for full inclusion. • Be Patient. • Remember this is the first of many conversations. Hearts change over time. Conversation Starters and Questions to Elicit Stories • What parts of my story resonated with you? • Where do you stand on the issue of full inclusion? • Are there things you have difficulty with and why? • Have you been to General Conference before? • What made you interested in becoming a delegate to General Conference? • What excites you about the future of the United Methodist Church? • Have you ever felt excluded or judged? How did that feel? • In what ways do you feel it is important for the United Methodist Church to be more inclusive? • What do you think the Church needs to do better to love our neighbor? • What is your primary passion or area of expertise at General Conference? • If you gave an address at General Conference, what would you include? Remember to use each of these questions as genuine conversation starters, but to continue to use the language of “love you neighbor” “do not judge” and by telling your story, help the delegate make connections between their feelings of wanting to be loved, and their opportunity to show Christian love by voting for full inclusion!
  9. 9. [8] EXERCISE #1 – ONE-TO-ONE SKILL BUILDING: Use this worksheet to plan your one-to-one practice exercise, make notes during the practice meeting, and reflect upon how it went. When you meet with a delegate, we recommend you do not bring a worksheet with you, but use the version on page 36 to prepare for your meeting. Prepare – use these spaces to write down plans for your meeting: Anything about your partner / delegate and common interests or values you share: Questions you might ask to elicit your partner/delegate’s story: One talking point or element of your story that you want to share: During the (practice) Meeting: Use this space for anything you learn about the delegate that you want to remember: Any part of your story the delegate responded to: How did the delegate respond to you when you asked if they will vote for full inclusion? After the meeting: Follow up with a thank-you card? Did you and the delegate plan to meet again or speak more on the phone? Go to rmnwitness.org/delegate-meeting to fill out a delegate report form. How else will you follow up with this delegate – e.g. recommending resources to them or giving their name to coalition team members as a possible volunteer? What went well? What would you do differently next time?
  10. 10. RELATIONAL ORGANIZING “Emotions are the language of values.” ~Marshall Ganz Our campaign is modeled on the work of Marshall Ganz. A Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government, Ganz teaches, researches, and writes on leadership, organization, and strategy in social movements, civic asso developed a model of public narrative suited to a broad range of organizing and advocacy work. Ganz posits that through our public storytelling we not only communicate our most cherished values, but in through our tales of challenge and growth. The following pages on organizing and public narrative are adapted from Ganz’s “Organizing Notes,” (© Marshall Ganz, Kennedy School of Government, 2008) “Public Narrative Worksheet,” (© Marshall Ganz, Kennedy School of Government, 2006) and “Public Narrative Workshop Guide,” (© Marshall Ganz, Kennedy School of Government, 2008) Public narrative combines a story of self, a story of us, and a story of now. These three stories can be woven togeth the movement as a way to engage and mobilize others to take action. A story of self tells why we have been called to serve. The key focus is on choice points, moments in our lives when our values are formed when we have to choose in the face of great uncertainty feel concern for others, care about being heard, about abuses of power, about poverty, about the natural world? Why? When did you feel you had to do some the circumstances? A story of us communicates why our community, organization, movement, campaign has been called to its mission. Just as with a person, the key is choice points in the life of the commu that express the values underlying the work your organization does. A story of now communicates the urgent challenge we are called upon to face now, the hope we can face if successful, and the choices we must make to act now (our • Why are you part of the UM Church? or Why are you called to do what you are doing? Self • [9] RGANIZING: STORYTELLING WITH A “Emotions are the language of values.” ~Marshall Ganz Our campaign is modeled on the work of Marshall Ganz. A Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government, Ganz teaches, researches, and writes on leadership, organization, and strategy in social movements, civic associations, and politics. Out of his advocacy work, Ganz developed a model of public narrative suited to a broad range of organizing and advocacy work. Ganz posits that through our public storytelling we not only communicate our most cherished values, but inspire others to act through our tales of challenge and growth. The following pages on organizing and public narrative are adapted from Ganz’s “Organizing Notes,” (© Marshall Ganz, Kennedy School of Government, 2008) “Public Narrative l Ganz, Kennedy School of Government, 2006) and “Public Narrative Workshop Guide,” (© Marshall Ganz, Kennedy School of Government, 2008) Public narrative combines a story of self, a story of us, and a story of now. These three stories can be woven together into one coherent story that links our values and passions with that of the movement as a way to engage and mobilize others to take action. tells why we have been called to serve. The key focus is on choice points, moments in our lives when our values are formed when we have to choose in the face of great uncertainty. care about being heard, about abuses of power, about poverty, about the natural world? Why? When did you feel you had to do something about it? Why did you feel you could? What were communicates why our community, organization, movement, campaign has been called to its mission. Just as with a person, the key is choice points in the life of the community and/or those moments that express the values underlying the work your organization does. communicates the urgent challenge we are called upon to face now, the hope we can face if successful, and the choices we must make to act now (our strategy). • Why is the United Methodist Church called to change? Us • What must we do to become the church we are called to be? Now TORYTELLING WITH A PURPOSE Our campaign is modeled on the work of Marshall Ganz. A Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government, Ganz teaches, researches, and writes on leadership, ciations, and politics. Out of his advocacy work, Ganz developed a model of public narrative suited to a broad range of organizing and advocacy work. Ganz posits that spire others to act through our tales of challenge and growth. The following pages on organizing and public narrative are adapted from Ganz’s “Organizing Notes,” (© Marshall Ganz, Kennedy School of Government, 2008) “Public Narrative l Ganz, Kennedy School of Government, 2006) and “Public Narrative Workshop Guide,” er into one coherent story that links our values and passions with that of tells why we have been called to serve. The key focus is on choice points, moments in our lives When did you first care about being heard, about abuses of power, about poverty, about the natural thing about it? Why did you feel you could? What were communicates why our community, organization, movement, campaign has been called to its nity and/or those moments communicates the urgent challenge we are called upon to face now, the hope we can face if What must we do to become the church we are called to be? Now
  11. 11. SKILL BUILDING: AN INTRODUCTION TO HOW DO WE TELL GOOD STORIES All good stories must have a plot which is usually structured like this: • Challenges you personally face as a member of a Church that excludes. • Choices you make in relation to these challenges. • Outcomes you experience because you made a choice to advocate for full inclusion. Elements of Strong Stories: • The moral, revealed through the r • Language of Emotion – I was hurt, betrayed, excited, happy, sad, angry, hopeful • Specific details – they call to mind a very particular time, place, setting, mood, color, sound, taste. • Many of our best stories have short beginnings middle, or leaving off the first third • Value language and scripture or hymn references which reinforce the moral Stories should… Be under 2 minutes: Good stories are focused and one moment in time. Focus on one challenge, one choice and one outcome. Be specific—use details: Take the listener to the moment you are describing. What are the sights, sounds, smells, and emotions of that moment. Use present tense. Try telling the story without using the word “and.” Tap into emotion: Stories should pull at values you are describing through the language of emotion. Include a challenge, a choice and an outcome: Make sure these three points are clear and well articulated. Offer hope: Stories should be inspirational. End on a positive note. Offer the good news through your story. Communicate values: Stories have a point and that point is a value that you want to inspire and cultivate in the listener. Beginning Movement toward a desired goal [10] NTRODUCTION TO STORIES TORIES? plot which is usually structured like this: you personally face as a member of a Church that excludes. you make in relation to these challenges. you experience because you made a choice to advocate for full inclusion. The moral, revealed through the resolution, brings understanding and hope hurt, betrayed, excited, happy, sad, angry, hopeful they call to mind a very particular time, place, setting, mood, color, sound, Many of our best stories have short beginnings –common suggestions include starting your middle, or leaving off the first third Value language and scripture or hymn references which reinforce the moral stories are focused and well organized. Remember you are telling the story of moment in time. Focus on one challenge, one choice and one outcome. use details: Take the listener to the moment you are describing. What are the sights, sounds, smells, and emotions of that moment. Use present tense. Try telling the story without using the Tap into emotion: Stories should pull at the heartstrings of the listener. Help the listener understand the values you are describing through the language of emotion. Include a challenge, a choice and an outcome: Make sure these three points are clear and well uld be inspirational. End on a positive note. Offer the good news through your Communicate values: Stories have a point and that point is a value that you want to inspire and cultivate An unexpected challenge, event or crisis Choices made in response to the crisis you experience because you made a choice to advocate for full inclusion. they call to mind a very particular time, place, setting, mood, color, sound, texture, common suggestions include starting your story in the . Remember you are telling the story of use details: Take the listener to the moment you are describing. What are the sights, sounds, smells, and emotions of that moment. Use present tense. Try telling the story without using the the heartstrings of the listener. Help the listener understand the Include a challenge, a choice and an outcome: Make sure these three points are clear and well uld be inspirational. End on a positive note. Offer the good news through your Communicate values: Stories have a point and that point is a value that you want to inspire and cultivate An outcome
  12. 12. [11] EXERCISE#2 – STORY OF SELF PREPARING YOUR STORY: Why you are called to do what you are doing? or Why you are a part of The United Methodist Church? Reflection Take time to reflect on your own story of self. Think about why you are called to be part of the United Methodist Church. Go back as far as you can remember. Focus on the challenges you had to face, the choices you made about how to deal with them, and the satisfaction – or frustration - you experienced. Why did you make those choices? Why did you do this and not that? Keep asking yourself, “Why?” Many of us who are active in the church and progressive movements have stories of both loss and hope. If we did not have stories of loss, we would not understand that loss is a part of the world, we would have no reason to try to fix things. But we also have stories of hope. Otherwise we wouldn’t be trying to fix it. By centering your story around hope, rather than loss, you offer listeners motivation to live out their values in a positive, life affirming way. Important Questions to Help Write your Story: • When did you first know you wanted to be a United Methodist? Why? • Why are you a Reconciling United Methodist, MFSA or Affirmation member? • When did you decide to stay in the denomination? Why? • When did you first know you needed to speak up on behalf of persons of all sexual orientations and gender identities? • When did you feel you had to take action on behalf of the church or members in it? • Why did you feel you could? What were the circumstances? • Who in your life taught you the importance of loving your neighbor? Of not judging? Map the plot (challenge, choice, and outcome) for your story here: What concrete images and action words bring your story to life? What values are you hoping to express in your story? Schedule: 2 min – gather in teams, choose timekeeper 5 min – Silent Preparation Time 15 min – Story telling time Each person gets: 2 min – tell your story 3 min – feedback & coaching 3 min – choose a story to share with the entire room
  13. 13. [12] GUIDELINES FOR COACHING STORIES Coaching Questions: • What worked? What resonated with you? • Why is this person working to build a more inclusive UMC? • What were the challenge, choice, and outcome? • What values were revealed in their decision? • What did you want to know more about? • What could have made the story clearer? Coaching Tips: DO say what works first in the story, focusing on specifics. DO identify both the CHALLENGE and the HOPE in the story. DO clarify choice points, the moment when one thing happened and not another. DO focus on the plot: connect the dots in the narrative, helping to illuminate how someone got from here to there. DO look for themes (common elements which highlight important values and experiences) DO ask questions about the intended audience and the desired action or response. DON’T offer vague abstract "feel good" comments, unless you’ve established the context. What does the story teller learn from “you did a great job”, as opposed to, “the way you described your moment of choice made me feel very hopeful because. . . . “ DON’T make value judgments about the story teller’s voice or the validity of the point they want to make. The key here is that a person find ways to express themselves in their own voice –word choice, humor, metaphor, etc. Of course they need to know if choices they’ve made communicate what they want to communicate. Notes: As you hear each other's stories, keeping track of the details of each person’s story will help you to provide feedback and remember details about the people on your team later. Name Plot, Details, Values, Hope, Comments
  14. 14. [13] THE STORY OF US A Story Of Us Is A Story About A Community That Is Called To Work Together. Our story of us allows us to make common cause with a broader community whose values we share. This is the story of who we are together; specifically, what it means for the United Methodist Church to be inclusive. A Story of Us identifies our common values through concrete examples. PREPARING TO TELL YOUR STORY OF US: Why is the Church Called to Change? REFLECTION: As you begin to craft your Story of Us reflect on why you are called to be United Methodist. Remember to illustrate the values through examples of concrete, shared experiences. Don’t just say you value inclusivity…. show it! • Think about The United Methodist Church and identify a common value which we share. • Try and remember a moment or time in which that value was embodied through concrete action or shared experience. Try to choose a moment to which the person to whom you are speaking can relate. • What have you and your audience shared together that expressed the values you hope to call upon? Important Questions to Help Write your Story: • What values motivate you to be United Methodist? • What values define what it means to be United Methodist? • How you understand the challenge facing the UMC today? • What common values of being United Methodist do you want to draw upon in crafting the Story of Us? What shared values would motivate others to vote for full inclusion? • What examples can you draw upon from concrete shared experience that convey or demonstrate those values? What values do you want to focus upon in your story? When have you seen the church, or church members live out those values? What did that feel, sound, look, taste like? How does your story of us expand upon your story of self? What similar values were apparent in your story of self?
  15. 15. [14] THE STORY OF NOW A Story of Now invites your listener to participate in concrete action to build a better future Your story of now will describe where we are (challenge), the possibility for a better future together (outcome), and what we must do to make that better future a reality (choices). • Challenge: What challenges do we face as a community? Why is it our challenge? Why are we in particular called to face this challenge? • Outcome: How will the outcome look or feel if we act together and build this movement and win this campaign? What specific realistic outcomes could we achieve if we act together on this campaign? • Choice: What choice do we need to make now to face our challenges? Where will we get the courage? Where will we get the hope? PREPARING TO TELL YOUR STORY OF NOW: What must we do to become the church we are called to be? Reflection Think about stories that convey the urgency of the challenge that’s staring us in the face. A story about why we have to act now. Think about stories that offer hope if we do act. Important Questions to Help Write your Story: • This choice needs to be made now. Why is it urgent? • What are the particular details of the challenges we face (smells, sounds, images)? • What is your specific vision for who we can be and what we can achieve for The United Methodist Church if we choose to act together now and vote for full inclusion? • Where’s the hope in this story? • Who would you be telling this story to? what about it would resonate with them? Identify the choice you are asking others to make here: Map the Challenge, Choice, and Outcome here:
  16. 16. [15] TRANSITIONS: WEAVING TOGETHER OUR STORIES: Weaving together our three stories into one 5 minute presentation can seem difficult when we first try, but with a little preparation and practice, you will find a comfortable way to transition from your personal calling to our common values, and into our shared purpose today. As you consider your three stories, write down common themes, values, and images in your three stories. What parts of our Methodist identity show up in your story of self? How can you rephrase or repeat your personal calling to work for inclusion as you describe our shared purpose for today and invite others to join us? What are the challenge choice and outcome for each of your stories: The common values, themes or images between your stories of self, us, and now: Other notes about your story:
  17. 17. [16] EXERCISE #3 – SELF, US, NOW: Use this space to plan your combined story: Story Challenge, Choice, Outcome? Common images, details, values Self Us Now Use this space to reflect upon your story. What went well? What will you do differently next time? How did it feel to tell your combined story? Schedule: 1 min – gather in pairs 5 min – Silent Preparation Time 16 min – Story telling time Each person gets: 5 min – tell your story 3 min – feedback & coaching 2 min – Reflect upon the experience and choose a storyteller to share their story with the group
  18. 18. [17] COACHING THE ENTIRE STORY: SELF – US – NOW • What worked? What resonated with you? • Why is this person working to build a more inclusive UMC? • What were the challenge, choice, and outcome? • What values were revealed in their decision? • What did you want to know more about? • What could have made the story clearer? • What images and values were present in all three parts of the story? • What are we called to do now? Notes: As you hear each other's stories, keeping track of the details of each story will help you to provide feedback and remember details as you offer coaching. Story Challenge Choice Outcome? Comments: Details, Values, Hope, Self Us Now
  19. 19. [18] COMMITMENT TO ACTION: ANNUAL CONFERENCE TEAM CONTACT PEOPLE: • • • NEXT ANNUAL CONFERENCE GATHERING: • Date & Time: • Location: I WILL MEET WITH THESE DELEGATES • • IF I LOSE DELEGATE CONTACT INFORMATION, I WILL CALL OR EMAIL: I WILL HAVE MET WITH THIS DELEGATE AT LEAST ONE TIME BY THIS DATE:
  20. 20. [19] RESOURCES AND APPENDICES: The History Of Called To Witness Campaign UMC 101 MFSA 101 Affirmation 101 RMN 101 Reconciling Congregations 101 General Conference 101 Volunteering at General Conference Common Witness Coalition 101 Jurisdictional Conference 101 Central Conferences Plan Helpful Resources and Bibliography RMN Legislative Goals MFSA’s Legislative Priorities Help Sheet for Delegate Meetings
  21. 21. [20] THE HISTORY OF CALLED TO WITNESS CAMPAIGN Called to Witness is a five-year strategic plan to equip, encourage and empower Reconciling volunteers across annual conferences as they build relationships across ideological and theological divides. The final year of Called to Witness will be held in coalition with MFSA and Affirmation. Called to Witness is predicated on the understanding that people don’t change their minds until they know people’s stories. By reaching out and building relationships we will create change one person at a time! This campaign strengthens the overarching mission of Reconciling Ministries Network: • To strengthen and empower our Reconciling Constituency. • To create Annual Conference Teams (A.C.T.) • To increase the number of Reconciling Congregations. • To affect change in policy and practice of The United Methodist Church OUR FIVE-YEAR PLAN: Each year, we have sought to involve more people in our exciting work as well as focus our organizing around new learning goals and action plans. 2007-2008 CTW 1: Called to Witness Goal: 500 Volunteers in 22 Annual Conferences Achieved: 500 Volunteers in 22 Annual Conferences Action: Tell our stories with General Conference delegates in 22 Annual Conferences Learning Goals: Introduction to Public Narrative (telling our stories) 2008-2009 CTW 2: All Means All Goal: 750 Volunteers in 35 Annual Conferences Achieved: 1024 Volunteers in 34 Annual Conferences Action: Tell our stories with Annual Conference members for legislative impact Learning Goals: Advanced Storytelling 2009-2010 CTW 3: Believe Out Loud Goal: 1000 Volunteers in 40 Annual Conferences Achieved: 1011 Volunteers in 36 Annual Conferences Action: Grow the movement by hosting gatherings of potential Reconciling United Methodists Learning Goal: Introduction to team building and introductions to one-to-one meetings 2010-2011 CTW 3: Believe Out Loud Together Goal: 1250 Volunteers in 50 Annual Conferences Achieved: 1800 Volunteers in 48 Annual Conferences Action: Plan witnesses at annual conferences to influence elections and grow our teams Learning Goal: Advanced strategic planning and advanced team building 2011-2012 CTW 5: Love Your Neighbor Goal: 1500 Volunteers in 55 Annual Conferences Action: Tell our stories to every General Conference delegate from the US Learning Goal: Advanced storytelling and advanced one-to-one meetings
  22. 22. [21] UMC 101* What is the Mission of the UMC? “To make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the World.” (2008 Book of Discipline) Organization of the United Methodist Church • The UMC does not put one person in charge of the denomination, like the Catholic Church and the pope; instead it is a representative body that includes a system of checks and balances. • The main “governing bodies” of the UMC are: o The General Conference (legislative branch) o Council of Bishops (executive) o Judicial Council (judicial) • Also included are Annual and Central Conferences, that set the rules and regulations for structures, churches and people within their boundaries The General Conference • General conference meets every four years (2004, 2008, 2012…) • This is the only body that is able to speak for the UMC, it consists of an equal number of lay and clergy delegates from around the world who are elected at the Annual and Central Conferences during the previous year (e.g. delegates to GC in 2012 will be voted in at Conferences in 2011). Bishops attend the GC, but cannot vote. • At General Conference, delegates discuss and vote on changes to church law. The changes can be proposed by individuals, agencies, annual conferences, and other groups within the UMC. • Most changes to church law require a simple majority vote at General Conference. • Changes to the Constitution of the UMC require: o 2/3rd vote of all delegates at General Conference o 2/3rd vote of the total votes of all delegates at all Annual and Central Conferences the following year. Thus, it does not need to pass 2/3rds of all ACs the following year; it just needs to pass 2/3rd total votes at all Annual and Central Conferences. The Council of Bishops • Together Bishops provide oversight of the entire UMC. Each bishop is appointed to a specific geographic area, called an Episcopal area, which can contain one or more annual conferences. • Bishops must be ordained elders in the UMC, and usually serve one area for eight years before appointment to another area. The Judicial Council • This is the legal system of the UMC. • It is comprised of 9 members, both clergy and lay who are elected by the GC for an 8-year term. • This council determines whether acts or proposed acts of General, Jurisdictional, Central, and Annual Conferences are constitutional. • There is no appeals process - when the Judicial Council makes a decision, it is final. * Adapted from: http://www.umc.org/site/c.lwL4KnN1LtH/b.1720699/k.528D/ Structure__Organization_Governance.htm
  23. 23. [22] MFSA 101 212 East Capitol St., NE | Washington, DC 20003 | Phone: 202-546-8806 | Fax: 202-546-6811 Methodist Federation for Social Action’s Mission & Vision: MFSA mobilizes, leads and sustains a progressive United Methodist movement that energizes people to be agents of God’s justice, peace and reconciliation. We envision a healed, renewed and fully inclusive United Methodist Church, which embodies God’s transforming love and grace in the world. Our Spiritual Foundation: MFSA is grounded in God’s inclusive love and open to the Spirit’s leading in the current age. Acting out of a deep spiritual yearning for justice and peace, we follow the radical teaching and example of Jesus. Our Guiding Values for our work: MFSA will ground all we do in the justice imperative of the Gospel in a way that inspires communities and activates members’ spiritual desire to do justice in the world. Inspired by the advocacy of Jesus for the least, the last and the lost, we will participate in God’s ongoing creation through doing justice in the world. MFSA will give voice, clearly and without apology, to the prophetic message of a holistic Gospel that honors the dignity and value of every human life. MFSA will deepen its understanding of the prophetic tradition by listening attentively and carefully to those on the margins of the church and of society. MFSA will speak and act in ways that honor truth over fear and integrity over comfort. MFSA will be fully inclusive and radically welcoming in our own practices and will work for this in the Church and in the world. MFSA is committed to being an agent of reconciliation in the journey towards full inclusion. MFSA will work nonviolently to end economic injustice, institutional racism, sexism, homophobia, militarism, and the degradation of the environment. These commitments will guide MFSA’s selection of issues and organizing strategies. We understand that work against injustice in any one of these areas brings us closer to justice in every one of these areas. As such we will work at the intersections of oppression, refusing to pit oppressed persons and groups against one another. MFSA is committed to bringing about systemic change and creating long-term solutions in ways that bring healing and hope to the church and the world. MFSA is committed to operating internally in a way that mirrors the change we hope to create in the world. How MFSA performs its work: Within MFSA: our primary work is done through Chapter formation and development – seeking to facilitate, strengthen and connect the work of progressive United Methodists locally and globally. Within the UMC: MFSA will provide a theologically grounded progressive vision and will organize to provide avenues for progressive United Methodists to transform the church. We often do this work in coalition with other progressive United Methodist groups who embrace a similar vision and guiding values in their work. Together, we are all seeking to lead our United Methodist Church in becoming a place that does justice, loves kindness and strives to walk humbly in the presence of God. Within society: MFSA will identify places where speaking from a progressive faith perspective can make a difference in public policy. MFSA will provide avenues for action for progressive United Methodists to bring about cultural and societal transformation.
  24. 24. [23] MFSA’s History: 1907 The Methodist Federation for Social Service was founded and writes the first Social Creed adopted by any Christian Church (our Methodist Episcopal Church). The Federation became Methodism’s unofficial rallying point for the Social Gospel. For almost four decades, the Federation was led by Bishop Francis J. McConnell and Harry F. Ward. 1920’s to 1930’s this leadership was fully shared by Winifred Chappell, a deaconess and devoted advocate for the workers’ struggle. 1930’s The Federation adopted as its goal the replacement of an economic system based on the struggle for profit with “social-economic planning to develop a society without class or group discriminations and privileges.” The Federation joined with other groups in sponsoring the defense of the Scottsboro Boys and several issues of the newsletter were devoted to countering discrimination against black persons, in both church and society. 1939 Following the reunification of the northern and southern branches of the church, the Federation strongly opposed the creation of the racially segregated Central Jurisdiction. MFSA chapters did not honor this policy of segregation and chapters remained racially integrated. 1941 As the U.S. became involved in World War II, the Federation concentrated on civil liberties issues including the rights of women workers, racial discrimination, the rights of conscientious objectors and the detention of Japanese-Americans in relocation camps. 1946 MFSA attained the height of its growth just following World War II under the leadership of Jack McMichael. With the coming of the anti-communist hysteria of the McCarthy period, relations with The Methodist Church became very strained and the Federation came under sharp attack. 1950’s MFSA experienced a serious decline. A dedicated remnant, including such leaders as Mark Chamberlin and Lee and Mae Ball, kept the Federation alive, through the publication of the Social Questions Bulletin (first published in 1911). 1973 MFSA experienced a broad revival under the leadership of George McClain, Executive Director of MFSA from 1973 to 1998. During this time the Federation re-established itself as a force within United Methodism. 1979 The Federation issued a documented study of the New Far Right presence in the denomination and rallied forces to stem its influence. 1980’s MFSA was the leading force in the struggle for UM support of disinvestment from South Africa, especially by the Board of Pensions. 1998 Kathryn J. Johnson became the new Executive Director, and served for nearly 12 years. Under her leadership MFSA continued to be a voice for peace and justice, calling for an end to the spiral of violence following September 11, 2001, opposing the invasion and occupation of Iraq, calling on the Board of Pensions to divest from companies benefiting from the occupation of Palestine and more. Johnson was instrumental in bringing about the “Voices of Faith” Conferences, which speak to current Christian social issues and empower persons to act on a wide variety of issues. 2007 MFSA held a conference celebrating its 100th Anniversary with the theme, Voices of Faith: Make Plain the Vision. 2011 Following an extensive search, Jill A. Warren was named the new Executive Director for MFSA, becoming the first lay member of the United Methodist Church to serve as Executive Director in MFSA’s 104 year history. Learn more about MFSA at: http://mfsaweb.org
  25. 25. Name: Affirmation: United Methodists for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Concerns. We frequently refer to ourselves as Affirmation: United Methodists, or even simply Affirmation. Mission: As an independent voice of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Affirmation radically reclaims the compassionate and transforming gospel of Jesus Christ by relentlessly pursuing full inclusion in the Church as we journey with the Spirit in creating God's beloved community. History: The year 1968 saw both the birth of The United Methodist Church and of the modern LGBTQ movement at the Stonewall Rebellion. At the 1972 General Conference, a handful of openly gay men offered the delegates and visitors the opportunity for conversation about homosexuality. F positively. Instead, in the waning hours of the Conference, sleepy delegates amended the new Social Principles to include the current 'incompatibility' statement. Shortly after this, the United Methodist Gay Caucus organized in Evanston, I Renamed Gay United Methodists, we made a powerful witness at the 1976 General Conference, insisting that our lives and our loving are gifts of God. In 1977 we formally became Affirmation: United Methodists for Lesbian and Gay Concerns. We recognize the value of naming people whose existence the Church seeks to deny. Thus as our awareness of God's rich diversity has grown, we have since changed our name several times in order to expand our vision. Affirmation: United Methodists continues to engage Ge denomination at large about the truth of our lives. In addition, through worship services, conferences and workshops, hosting speakers, and social gatherings, we seek to provide spiritual and emotional support for LGBTQ United Methodists and our Allies. Early on we recognized that the struggle for equality was greater than just our membership and planned on ways to include local congregations. The 1984 General Conference added specific provisions against gay or lesbian Program (RCP) as a way for United Methodist congregations to publicly welcome and affirm people of different sexual orientations and gender identities. After a few years it became clear that RCP and Affirmation would each be stronger as separate organizations. They are now the Reconciling Ministries Network and continue working with Affirmation. For General Conference 2012, we are again partnering with the Reconciling Ministries Network (RMN) and the Methodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) as the Common Witness Coalition. [24] AFFIRMATION 101 Methodists for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Concerns. We frequently refer to ourselves as Affirmation: United Methodists, or even simply Affirmation. As an independent voice of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer people (LGBTQ), Affirmation radically reclaims the compassionate and transforming gospel of Jesus Christ by relentlessly pursuing full inclusion in the Church as we journey with the Spirit in creating God's beloved community. h the birth of The United Methodist Church and of the modern LGBTQ movement at the Stonewall Rebellion. At the 1972 General Conference, a handful of openly gay men offered the delegates and visitors the opportunity for conversation about homosexuality. F positively. Instead, in the waning hours of the Conference, sleepy delegates amended the new Social Principles to include the current 'incompatibility' statement. Shortly after this, the United Methodist Gay Caucus organized in Evanston, IL. Renamed Gay United Methodists, we made a powerful witness at the 1976 General Conference, insisting that our lives and our loving are gifts of God. In 1977 we formally became Affirmation: United Methodists for Lesbian and Gay Concerns. We recognize he value of naming people whose existence the Church seeks to deny. Thus as our awareness of God's rich diversity has grown, we have since changed our name several Affirmation: United Methodists continues to engage General Conference delegates and the denomination at large about the truth of our lives. In addition, through worship services, conferences and workshops, hosting speakers, and social gatherings, we seek to provide spiritual and emotional support for United Methodists and our Allies. Early on we recognized that the struggle for equality was greater than just our membership and planned on ways to include local congregations. The 1984 General Conference added specific provisions against gay or lesbian clergy. We responded by announcing the Reconciling Congregation Program (RCP) as a way for United Methodist congregations to publicly welcome and affirm people of different sexual orientations and gender identities. After a few years it became t RCP and Affirmation would each be stronger as separate organizations. They are now the Reconciling Ministries Network and continue working with Affirmation. For General Conference 2012, we are again partnering with the Reconciling Ministries Network MN) and the Methodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) as the Common Witness Coalition. Methodists for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Concerns. We frequently refer to ourselves as Affirmation: United Methodists, or even simply Affirmation. people (LGBTQ), Affirmation radically reclaims the compassionate and transforming gospel of Jesus Christ by relentlessly pursuing full inclusion in the Church as we journey with the Spirit in creating God's beloved community. h the birth of The United Methodist Church and of the modern LGBTQ movement at the Stonewall Rebellion. At the 1972 General Conference, a handful of openly gay men offered the delegates and visitors the opportunity for conversation about homosexuality. Few responded positively. Instead, in the waning hours of the Conference, sleepy delegates amended the new Social Conference, insisting that our lives and our loving are gifts of God. In 1977 we formally awareness of God's rich diversity has grown, we have since changed our name several neral Conference delegates and the denomination at large about the truth of our lives. In addition, through worship services, conferences and workshops, hosting speakers, and social gatherings, we seek to provide spiritual and emotional support for Early on we recognized that the struggle for equality was greater than just our membership and planned on ways to include local congregations. The 1984 General Conference added specific provisions clergy. We responded by announcing the Reconciling Congregation Program (RCP) as a way for United Methodist congregations to publicly welcome and affirm people of different sexual orientations and gender identities. After a few years it became t RCP and Affirmation would each be stronger as separate organizations. They are now the Reconciling Ministries Network and continue working with Affirmation. For General Conference 2012, we are again partnering with the Reconciling Ministries Network MN) and the Methodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) as the Common Witness Coalition.
  26. 26. Organizational Structure: Affirmation: United Methodists continues to value the voice of each individual. One way we live this out is to remain an all volunteer organization, guided by a Council. Leading our Council are our Co Coordinators (generally one male and one female). Authorized to officially speak for the Council and for the Affirmation organization are our Co make decisions by consensus, seeking to honor the opinions of all and not have 'winners' or 'losers' in decisions. Looking Ahead to General Conference 2012: At Sing A New Song, Affirmation: United Methodists will be present and actively pa official beginning of the Love Your Neighbor Campaign. In the months leading up to General Conference 2012, Affirmation members will be part of the Called to Witness work. We will dialogue with General Conference delegates about the damage caused to individuals and to our Church by the current words in The Book of Discipline, and about the need to change the language and attitudes behind them. Affirmation will be active in Tampa, FL, at the Conference. Through a daily newsletter we will continue informing members, delegates, and visitors of necessary Discipline changes. We will show our presence through rainbow colored bandanas. We will celebrate our lives in social gatherings. And we will support one another in our mutual presence and through a crisis phone line staffed with trained chaplains. The symbol represents transgender persons the third arm combines both to represent the transgender experience. For more infor http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBTQ_symbols Contact: for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Concerns Post Office Box 1021 | Evanston, IL 60204 http://www.umaffirm.org [25] Affirmation: United Methodists continues to value the voice of each individual. One way we live organization, guided by a Council. Leading our Council are our Co Coordinators (generally one male and one female). Authorized to officially speak for the Council and for the Affirmation organization are our Co-Spokespersons (also generally one female and one male). We make decisions by consensus, seeking to honor the opinions of all and not have 'winners' or 'losers' in Looking Ahead to General Conference 2012: At Sing A New Song, Affirmation: United Methodists will be present and actively pa official beginning of the Love Your Neighbor Campaign. In the months leading up to General Conference 2012, Affirmation members will be part of the Called to Witness work. We will dialogue with General mage caused to individuals and to our Church by the current words in , and about the need to change the language and attitudes behind them. Affirmation will be active in Tampa, FL, at the Conference. Through a daily ill continue informing members, delegates, and visitors of necessary changes. We will show our presence through rainbow colored bandanas. We will celebrate our lives in social gatherings. And we will support one another in our and through a crisis phone line staffed with trained chaplains. transgender persons. Two of the arms are traditional symbols for male and female; the third arm combines both to represent the transgender experience. For more information, visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBTQ_symbols . Affirmation: United Methodists for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Concerns Evanston, IL 60204 | E-Mail: umaffirmaiton@yahoo.com Website: umaffirm.org | Facebook: Affirmation: United Methodists Affirmation: United Methodists continues to value the voice of each individual. One way we live organization, guided by a Council. Leading our Council are our Co- Coordinators (generally one male and one female). Authorized to officially speak for the Council and for d one male). We make decisions by consensus, seeking to honor the opinions of all and not have 'winners' or 'losers' in At Sing A New Song, Affirmation: United Methodists will be present and actively participating in the official beginning of the Love Your Neighbor Campaign. In the months leading up to General Conference 2012, Affirmation members will be part of the Called to Witness work. We will dialogue with General mage caused to individuals and to our Church by the current words in , and about the need to change the language and attitudes behind them. Affirmation will be active in Tampa, FL, at the Conference. Through a daily ill continue informing members, delegates, and visitors of necessary changes. We will show our presence through rainbow colored bandanas. We will celebrate our lives in social gatherings. And we will support one another in our and through a crisis phone line staffed with trained chaplains. . Two of the arms are traditional symbols for male and female; mation, visit Mail: umaffirmaiton@yahoo.com Website: Facebook: Affirmation: United Methodists
  27. 27. [26] RMN 101 3801 North Keeler Avenue | Chicago, IL 60641 • Phone: 773-736-5526 | Fax: 773-736-5475 RMN’s Mission Statement: Reconciling Ministries Network mobilizes United Methodists of all sexual orientations and gender identities to transform our Church and world into the full expression of Christ’s inclusive love. How RMN performs its work: • Relationship building – seeking to build relationships with those who believe in equality and those who don’t, working to change the Church one conversation at a time. • Education and training – RMN provides valuable resources and tools to ensure United Methodists have the words to discuss their vision of inclusion and makes those available at events across the country and on their website. • Leadership development – by providing trainings to local leaders and investing in the success of communities the worldwide church is strengthened. • Isolation reduction and community empowerment – providing opportunities for those who feel secluded to come and be a part of Reconciling communities. • Grassroots organizing and mobilization – seeking to build local leaders whose work across the connection, strengthens the work of all and empowering local congregations and communities. • Collaborative work – reaching out to other organizations to build support for full equality for LBGT in the UMC. Strategic Goals for RMN (2009-2012): • Increase the quantity and capacity of Reconciling Congregations/Communities and individual Reconciling Methodists; • Model God’s diverse creation within RMN, with intentional emphasis upon the full inclusion of LGBT persons, young adults and people of color; • Live out the connectionalism of a world-wide church with clergy, laity and LGBT groups through the entire connection; • Participate in the connectional processes and power structures of the UMC by speaking truth to power; • Deepen collaboration with allied organizations; • Enhance RMN’s long-term success by emphasizing organizational excellence and financial stability. RMN History: Major Milestones 1982 – Affirmation begins planning a church based program for intentional full inclusion 1984 – The first twelve churches declare themselves “Reconciling congregations” 1987 – First Reconciling Convocation in Chicago, IL with 120 people attending 1996 – First official General Conference Witness – theme was Open the Doors 1997 – National office moves from Washington DC to Chicago, IL 2000 – General Conference Witness: Extend the Table 2000 – Reconciling Congregations Program changes names to become the “Reconciling Ministries Network” (and adopt a new logo) 2004 – General Conference Witness: Watermarked 2007 – Called to Witness grassroots 5 year organizing campaign began 2008 – General Conference Witness: One Family Tree Learn more RMN history at: http://www.rmnetwork.org/about-us/history/
  28. 28. [27] RECONCILING CONGREGATIONS 101 Three steps to affiliate with RMN: 1. Our basic requirement is a public statement of inclusion that particularly mentions “people of all sexual orientations and gender identities" or “LGBT persons.” Because of the policy statements against homosexual persons by the United Methodist Church, we do need reconciling congregations to be specific in their welcome. Some churches expand their welcome statement to list many groups for intentional welcome and we appreciate that as well. The Reconciling statement is the product of a discussion/educational process that includes a variety of opportunities for people to learn many things: about GLBT experience, about true hospitality, about the teachings of Jesus that require inclusion and justice. Articles, speakers, videos, sermons, artwork, and field trips are some of the ways people are opened to talk and listen as they develop a greater understanding for the need and call to full inclusion. This statement is all you need to affiliate with our movement. This statement must be approved by some leadership group within the congregation or community. Then please send it to us on church letterhead with a few sentences about who voted and the longer history of welcome within your group (perhaps include some activities). 2. We also request that each congregation keep the welcome statement in front of people. Most print it in the Sunday bulletin as part of their welcome. Newsletters, outdoor signs, letterhead, etc. are other options for public witness. Once a year we anticipate that your Reconciling Congregation or Community will celebrate a special Sunday. We suggest the 4th Sunday of January. We send some materials to you that may aid in the development of this worship service. Many congregations choose to hold their special Sunday during June pride month or on the anniversary of their decision to join with RMN. 3. We ask each Reconciling Congregation or Community to contribute annually. However, there is no membership fee, it is not required. As a guideline, we ask $250 annually. Some RCs give more, some less. The ways to raise the contribution vary—some have a special collection, some have fundraisers, some have a line item in their church budget. Besides providing resources to congregations, the national office ministers to many who are isolated and searching for a spiritual home. We receive no funding from the UMC and rely on donations of individuals, congregations and occasional grants from foundations. We receive checks from many churches. The contribution may also be sent through a separate committee or individual. What resources can help me as I work to make my community reconciling? • Learn more about the best resources online at www.rmnetwork.org/rc-process • Institute for Welcoming Resources “Welcoming Toolkit”: http://www.welcomingresources.org/welcoming.xml • Reconciling Process webinar series: videos and information about various topics and skills pertaining to facilitating a congregational decision. Visit www.rmnetwork.org/rc-process to watch previous webinar videos or sign up for the next webinar! • Bible Studies/DVDs: http://www.rmnetwork.org/learn-more/resources/
  29. 29. [28] GENERAL CONFERENCE 101 What is General Conference? • Like Annual conference, General Conference has multiple meetings. • First, it is a global meeting of members of the United Methodist Church; • Second, it is the event at which the United Methodist’s governing policies, known as the Book of Discipline, are reevaluated and rewritten. • It is comprised of 1,000 delegates (half clergy & half lay) from the global United Methodist Church. • It takes place every 4 years (same years as the Summer Olympics or as a US Presidential Election). • The General Conference in 2008 included close to 9,000 petitions, resolutions, reports and a budget of approximately 650 million dollars. Why does it matter? • General Conference is the legislative body of the United Methodist Church, and the only entity who can make official statements or positions for the church as a whole. • Every General Conference, there is an opportunity to vote to change the portions of the Book of Discipline which stigmatize and exclude members of the LGBT community. What do we hope to accomplish? • The ultimate goal is that, of the 1,000 delegates present at General Conference, at the very least, 501 of them will vote to remove the exclusionary passages pertaining to LGBT people, which would mean: o United Methodist Churches and Clergy persons can celebrate same-sex unions; o Openly gay persons, partnered and single, can be ordained as clergy in the UMC; o No one can be prevented from participation, membership, or ordination based upon their sexuality or gender identity. Legislation Petitions and resolutions to add to or edit the Book of Discipline or Book of Resolutions can be submitted by any United Methodist member individually or by any official UM group, board or agency. The General Conference also receives and acts upon study commission reports, and General Board and Agency reports (including budgets). Petitions and resolutions are assigned to legislative committees at General Conference based on their content. Legislative committees are made up of elected delegates and they in turn elect committee leadership and then break into subcommittees to review and refine legislation. Subcommittees bring petitions before the entire committee with the recommendation to reject, adopt, or adopt as amended. During consideration by the entire committee, additional amendments may be made. Then, the entire committee votes to recommend to the General Conference (the full 1000 delegates) what action should be taken on the legislation. No action is final until taken by the entire General Conference during its plenary session.
  30. 30. [29] LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR MISSION TRIP TO TAMPA: VOLUNTEERING AT GENERAL CONFERENCE Next April, coalition volunteers will surround the General Conference in prayer and support; some will come for one or two days, others will remain for the entire two week General Conference and surrounding days! These volunteers will offer hospitality, resources for legislative decisions, and powerful witness – actions and public demonstrations – to encourage delegates to build a church that embodies the great commandment: Love God and Love Neighbor! Some of the many activities that Love Your Neighbor volunteers might engage in include: Monitor committee legislative work Meet with delegates to share information and support Cook and serve meals & hospitality to delegates and volunteers Provide logistical support to coalition volunteers (housing, transportation, etc) Help write, create & distribute daily coalition newsletter Share pictures, blogs, and tweets about General Conference progress Pass out rainbow stoles, buttons, and other swag Pass out water bottles, cookies and other hospitality items Assist with coalition worship service Dance in a flash-mob Many other exciting opportunities! People who would like to volunteer at General Conference should register their interest at: www.surveymonkey.com/s/XG6QKHR JURISDICTIONAL CONFERENCE 101 • Jurisdictions are regions of the Annual conferences within the United States. There are five jurisdictions in the United States: Northeast, Southeast, South Central and Western. • Each jurisdiction meets once every four years, in the summer after General Conference. • The delegates to Jurisdictional Conferences include all delegates to General Conference and an equal or greater number of additional delegates. • At Jurisdictional Conference, delegates elect and appoint bishops, nominate individuals to serve on General Boards and Agencies, and conduct other regional business. The election of bishops often dominates the business at the Jurisdictional Conferences. • Reconciling people have offered witnesses, supported legislation calling for inclusion, and influenced elections at Jurisdictional Conferences for many years.
  31. 31. [30] COMMON WITNESS COALITION 101 The Common Witness Coalition has, for three general conferences, been primarily comprised of Affirmation, the Methodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) and the Reconciling Ministries Network (RMN). Forming a unified response to issues of justice, including issues of sexuality and inclusiveness, the coalition has developed a “Common Witness Statement” for each subsequent General Conference, outlining the primary goals that they hope to see in a socially engaged, progressive and inclusive United Methodist Church. They also actively invite other official and unofficial UM groups, caucuses and leaders to sign the Common Witness Statement and work together at General Conference to affect positive change in our church. With each General Conference, an amazing number of volunteers come to work with the Coalition, most at their own expense. In 2011, through a grant from the Arcus Foundation, MFSA was able to hire a Coalition Coordinator, Rev. Steve Clunn, to work specifically on helping our three primary Common Witness Coalition groups organize prior to and at General Conference further ahead than ever before. Since this past January the Coalition has been working closely with MFSA chapters, Reconciling groups, Affirmation groups, and individuals to pass progressive GC petitions and resolutions at annual conferences or subsequently submit legislation directly to the General Conference. In the midst of all the work we are doing together, the Spirit has been moving in and through our church. The Common Witness Coalition has responded joyfully in support of the retired Bishop’s “Statement of Counsel to the Church 2011,” calling for the removal of restrictions on ordination for LGBT persons, and the subsequent endorsement and petition put out by our Black Scholars and Clergy of the United Methodist Church. • From here we focus on moving inclusive, “Jesus Justice” legislation forward to General Conference 2012. • We continue to grow our progressive community to include all those hopeful, loving GC delegates that believe John Wesley’s call to do “no harm” can and will be lived out in an inclusive UMC that values and celebrates the gifts of all of God’s beloved children. • We offer our new “Common Witness Statement” to other like-minded and hearted groups and UM leaders so that our Coalition and work can expand. • We will also continue to support our LGBT clergy, like the Rev. Amy DeLong, and any United Methodist who finds her/himself being subjected to the spiritual abuse that we have been working to overcome for nearly forty years. We have made an incredible difference in years past and it is our firm belief that the votes going in favor of a fully inclusive church is not a matter of if, but when!
  32. 32. [31] “We, the Common Witness Coalition, see General Conference as a launching pad for building relationships that will be a foundation for our future work together as a global church.” – Troy Plummer, RMN Executive Director To volunteer with the Central Conferences initiative of the Love your Neighbor Campaign, or if you speak Spanish, French, Portuguese, Spanish or Swahili and can offer translation/linguistic services, please contact the coalition by emailing breakingbread@rmnetwork.org! COMMON WITNESS CENTRAL CONFERENCES PLAN Live out the connectionalism of a worldwide church with the clergy, laity and LGBT groups of the Central Conferences through communication and relationship building identifying both unique needs and common causes We will reach out to Central conference lay and clergy leaders in four primary ways: 1. Building a Love your Neighbor Website in French, Swahili, Portuguese, and Spanish The Love your Neighbor / Aimez Votre Voisin / Ame O Sue Pròjimo / Mpende Jirani Yako website will include information about the Love Your Neighbor campaign, legislative resources, and information to demystify sexual orientation and gender identity to support a call for anti-violence work with respect for the human rights of ALL persons. 2. Build relationships between lay and clergy leaders in Central Conferences and culturally competent volunteers In the Fall of 2011, a Central Conferences relationships coordinator will begin identifying and building relationships and mobilizing a network of progressive leaders across our United Methodist connection. The coordinator will create a system to track and share this network of relationships with lay and clergy leaders in Central Conferences and facilitate relationships between leaders of particular geographic regions and groups working with common goals and passions. 3. Recruit, train and support an advance-hospitality team to provide local support in Tampa to all Central Conference delegates This hospitality team hopes to provide language, logistical support and opportunities to build relationships around common cause with Central Conference delegates. 4. Publish a daily newsletter during General Conference in Tampa specifically for Central Conference Delegates This newsletter will be tailored to the concerns and interests of Central Conference Delegates; it will be published in at least English and French, with Swahili and Portuguese if resources allow.
  33. 33. [32] HELPFUL RESOURCES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY WEBSITES: www.loveyourneighbor2012.org – The Love your Neighbor Campaign website with resources, an event calendar, blog posts about trainings and actions, and printable toolkits. www.generalconference2012.org – Common Witness coalition website with information about upcoming General Conference Actions, legislation, and how to get more involved in the work in Tampa in April 2012. www.welcomingresources.org – The Institute for Welcoming Resources supports over thirteen ecumenical ally groups who are working for full inclusion in their denominations. IWR offers trainings, resources and connections to the broad movement to end discrimination based on sexuality or gender. BIBLE STUDIES AND CURRICULA: Claiming the Promise (RMN) This eight-week study examines each of the traditional “clobber” passages in the light of their historical context and themes which run throughout the biblical narrative. Rethink Inclusion online at www.rethinkinclusion.org A free, fully downloadable four-session study on how Biblical principles frame the issues of justice and inclusion and inspire participants to take action to transform our Church and our world into the full expression of Christ's inclusive love. Talking about Homosexuality co authored by Co-Authors: Karen P. Oliveto, Kelly D. Turney, Traci C. West. A six week discussion guide using the Wesleyan Quadrilateral to help groups reflect on Christian beliefs and personal experiences about sexual orientation. FILMS: Fish Out of Water (2010) This 90 minute film documents a young woman’s journey back to the Bible and provides a simple, understandable yet surprisingly thoughtful analysis of the Biblical passages traditionally used to condemn homosexuality. For the Bible Tells me So (2008) Through the experience of five Christian families this film explores how people of faith handle the realization of having a gay child. For The Bible Tells Me So offers healing, clarity and understanding to anyone caught in the crosshairs of scripture and sexual identity. ORGANIZING AND PUBLIC NARRATIVE INFORMATION Marshall Ganz - Web training module on organizing is accessible online at http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k2139 (see page 9 for introduction to Ganz) Beth Zemsky – Strategic leadership consultant and expert in LGBT inclusion in society and faith communities. Beth led strategic planning processes for RMN and MFSA. www.bethzemsky.com Task Force Academy for Leadership and Action - http://www.thetaskforce.org/our_work/academy
  34. 34. [33] ACADEMIC / IN-DEPTH BIBLICAL SCHOLARSHIP OR THEOLOGY Jesus, the Bible, and Homosexuality: Explode the Myths, Heal the Church, revised and expanded edition. By Jack Rogers (Westminster John Knox; 2009) A rigorous yet accessible theological study and a model of spiritual discernment which reconciles scripture and sexual orientation. What the Bible Really Says about Homosexuality by Daniel Helminiak (Alamo Square Press, 1994, 2000 ISBN 1- 886360-09-X). This professor and Roman Catholic priest thoroughly examines current Biblical scholarship to examine Biblical passages about sexuality, hospitality and ethics. RMN LEGISLATIVE GOALS RMN’s legislative goals are simple: we believe that scripture, reason, experience and tradition negate any semblance of discrimination and call us to include all persons in the church. Therefore, we seek full participation, membership, marriage and ordination of all persons of all sexual orientations and gender identities. Below is a list of the paragraphs in the 2008 United Methodist Book of Discipline which we seek to amend: Discipline Paragraph: ¶161F • Topic: Human Sexuality • Recommended Revision: remove, “The United Methodist Church does not condone the practice of homosexuality and consider this practice incompatible with Christian teaching.” This sentence is often referred to as “the incompatibility language” and is quoted in ¶304.3, the footnote to ¶311.2(d) on p212 & p215, and referred to in paragraph ¶2702.20. Discipline Paragraph: ¶161B • Topic: Marriage • Recommended Revision: replace “man and woman” with “two consenting adults” Discipline Paragraph: ¶304.3 • Topic: Qualifications for Ordination • Recommended Revision: Delete incompatible language and sentence reading: “therefore self-avowed practicing homosexuals are not to be Certified as candidates, ordained as ministers, or appointed to serve in The United Methodist Church” Discipline Paragraph: Footnote 3 of ¶311.2(d) and Footnote 3 of ¶311.2(d) • Topic: Candidacy for Licensed and Ordained Ministry
  35. 35. [34] • Recommended Revision: remove the footnote reading: “The General Conference, in response to expressions throughout the Church regarding homosexuality and ordination, reaffirms the present language of the Discipline regarding the character and commitment of persons seeking ordination and affirms its high standards.” Discipline Paragraph: ¶341.6 • Topic: Unauthorized conduct (i.e. forbidden ministries) • Recommended Revision: remove the subparagraph .341.6: “Ceremonies that celebrate homosexual unions shall not be conducted by our ministers and shall not be conducted in our churches.” Discipline Paragraph: ¶613.20 and ¶806.9 • Topic: Responsibilities [of Councils of Finance and Administration for Conferences(¶613.20) and the General church(¶806.9)]. • Recommended Revision: Remove the so called funding ban and restrictions upon the ministry of congregations and General Agencies: “to ensure that no annual conference board, agency, committee, commission, or council shall give United Methodist funds to any gay caucus or group, or otherwise use such funds to promote the acceptance of homosexuality” Discipline Paragraph: ¶2702.1 • Topic: Chargeable Offenses and the Statute of Limitations for which an ordained clergy person might be disciplined • Remove 2702.1(a) and 2702(b) which make it possible to discipline clergy for (a) homosexuality or (b) presiding at weddings (of same-sex couples). • (a) … including but not limited to, not being celibate in singleness or not faithful in a heterosexual marriage;** • (b) practices declared by The United Methodist Church to be incompatible with Christian teachings, including but not limited to: being a self-avowed practicing homosexual; or conducting ceremonies which celebrate homosexual unions; or performing same-sex wedding ceremonies…”
  36. 36. [35] MFSA’S LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES FOR GC 2012 Manifest God’s hospitality to all persons: Includes petitions related to UMC membership, full participation in UMC ministries, removal of language from the UM Discipline that prohibits full participation in the church, petitions that make churches accessible to those with disabilities, and those that eliminate barriers that make persons of color feel less welcome Follow the example of Christ’s non-violent love: Includes petitions that lead in development of non-violent alternatives to conflict in our personal lives, our communities, our nation, and our world, and calls for peacemaking. Promote racial and interfaith justice and reconciliation: Includes petitions that address issues of immigration, racial profiling and religious intolerance and understanding the gifts of diversity. Demand justice for those who are most vulnerable: Includes petitions that address issues of poverty, living wage, pensions, and health care, within the church and the larger society especially in ministries reaching out to women and children. Work for a fully participatory church where all voices are heard: Includes petitions related to the global nature of the UMC that allow for regional and cultural expression and autonomy while maintaining our global nature. Support Peace in the Middle East: Includes petitions that continue advocating for peace in the Holy Land, Iraq, Afghanistan and Iran. Support for sexuality education and the moral agency of women in reproductive health matters: Includes petitions related to membership in the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, support for stem cell research, and concerns for the overall health of women. Protect human rights and civil liberties: Includes petitions that affirm the UM prophetic tradition of support for human rights and civil liberties of all peoples and working with national and international civil liberties and human rights organizations in this endeavor. Protect planet earth: Includes petitions that support actions and policies that put clean, innovative energy technologies to use that reduce global warming and defend our planet from nuclear weapons and environmental dangers. Affirm the openness of our Wesleyan tradition: Includes petitions that affirm our Wesleyan heritage of theological openness and inquiry as we seek to deepen our discipleship as faithful Christians, and celebrate the freedom of thought and expression in our pulpits, universities and seminaries.
  37. 37. [36] HELPFUL PREPARATION AND NOTES FOR DELEGATE MEETINGS: Prepare – use these spaces to write down plans for your meeting: Anything about your partner / delegate and common interests or values you share: Questions you might ask to elicit your partner/delegate’s story: One talking point or element of your story that you want to share: Planning your Meeting: Sample Agenda: • Pray • Introduce yourself • Story of Self • Ask, “Why are you a United Methodist?” • Story of Us • Ask, “What is important to you about being United Methodist?” • Story of Now • Ask the representative to vote for full inclusion. • Respond with respect and love • Thank your representative • Close in prayer. Use this space for anything you learn about the delegate that you want to remember: Any part of your story the delegate responded to: How did the delegate respond to you when you asked if they will vote for full inclusion? After the meeting: Follow up with a thank-you card? Did you and the delegate plan to meet again or speak more on the phone? Go to rmnwitness.org/delegate-meeting to fill out a delegate report form. How else will you follow up with this delegate – e.g. recommending resources to them or giving their name to coalition team members as a possible volunteer?
  38. 38. [37] HELPFUL TALKING POINTS (SUMMARY) Love God’s People—All God’s People Do not Judge / Trust God The Word of God Changes Hearts Our Wesleyan and Protestant traditions call us to side with God’s people: Love Your Neighbor – God is Love • 1 John 4:16 So we have come to know and to believe the love that God has for us. God is love, and whoever abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him. • Mark 12:31 The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.” • Romans 13:9 The commandments…are summed up in this word: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” CONVERSATION STARTERS AND QUESTIONS TO ELICIT STORIES • What parts of my story resonated with you? • Where do you stand on the issue of full inclusion? • Are there things you have difficulty with and why? • Have you been to General Conference before? • What made you interested in becoming a delegate to General Conference? • What excites you about the future of the United Methodist Church? • Have you ever felt excluded or judged? How did that feel? • In what ways do you feel it is important for the United Methodist Church to be more inclusive? • What do you think the Church needs to do better to love our neighbor? • Where is your primary passion or area of expertise at General Conference • If you gave an address at General Conference, what would you include?
  39. 39. [38] JURISDICTIONAL ORAGNIZERS AND CAMPAIGN STAFF: Eric Strader Cal/Nevada, Yellowstone, Rocky Mountain Eric@rmnwitness.org Phone: (303) 886–3278 Gheeta Smith Kansas East, Kansas West Gheeta@rmnwitness.org Phone: (801) 232–6646 Joey Lopez Nebraska, Southwest Texas Joey@rmnwitness.org Phone: (336) 880–7222 Joseph Kyser New England, Western Pennsylvania Joseph@rmnwitness.org Phone: (660) 353–1505 Katy Krumbach Memphis, West Virginia, North Texas Katy@rmnwitness.org Phone: (770) 602–6909 Kelley Frances Fenelon Alabama West Florida, North Alabama Kelleyfrances@rmnwitnes.org Phone: (601) 842–3031 Kristian Clauser Dakotas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa Kristian@rmnwitness.org Phone: ( 612) 220–2502 Laura Young, Campaign Coach Louisiana , Northwest Texas, Texas Lauray@rmnwitness.org Phone: (936) 581–9401 Matt Coyle North Georgia, Peninsula Delaware Matt@rmnwitness.org Phone: (615) 794–1336 Matthew Mustard Baltimore-Washington Mustard@rmnwitness.org Phone: (202) 332–4010 Sean Delmore East Ohio, Indiana Sean@rmnwitness.org Phone: (617) 899–0929 Shannon Sullivan Greater New Jersey, Upper New York Shannon@rmnwitness.org Phone: (410) 937–8835 Shells Stephens California Pacific, West Ohio, Northern Illinois Shells@rmnwitness.org Phone: (317) 250–2729 Siobhan Sargent, Campaign Coach Eastern Pennsylvania, Florida, Susquehanna siobhan@rmnwitness.org Phone: (727) 251–2407
  40. 40. CAMPAIGN Methodist Federation For Social Action http://www.mfsaweb.org 212 East Capitol Street NE Washington, DC 20003 (202) 546–8806 mfsa@mfsaweb.org JURISDICTIONAL Rachel Harvey, Campaign Co-Director Arkansas, Oklahoma, Mississippi Rachel@rmnwitness.org Phone: (773) 501–0584 Audrey Krumbach, Campaign Co North Carolina, Oregon Idaho, Holston Audrey@rmnwitness.org Phone: (847) 899–4899 Laura Rossbert, Campaign Co-Director Missouri, Virginia, Tennessee Email: Laurar@rmnwitness.org Phone: (615) 788–4928 Anthony Fatta Kentucky, Western North Carolina Anthony@rmnwitness.org Phone: (315) 572–1320 [39] AMPAIGN LEADERSHIP DIRECTORY Reconciling Ministries Network http://www.rmnetwork.org 3801 North Keeler Avenue Chicago, IL 60640 (773) 736–5526 office@rmnetwork.org Affirmation: http://www.umaffirm.org/ umaffirmation@yahoo.com URISDICTIONAL ORAGNIZERS AND CAMPAIGN Director Arkansas, Oklahoma, Mississippi Campaign Co-Director North Carolina, Oregon Idaho, Holston Director Kentucky, Western North Carolina Britt Cox Central Texas, South Carolina, Pacific Britt@rmnwitness.org Phone: Casey Madsen Detroit, Kentucky Casey@rmnwitness.org Phone: (812) 698–2971 Christina Wright North Georgia, West Michigan, South Georgia Christina@rmnwitness.org Phone: (617) 875–6955 Cody Nielson Illinois Great Rivers, Iowa Cody@rmnwitness.org Phone: (319) 759–9688 Y Affirmation: http://www.umaffirm.org/ umaffirmation@yahoo.com STAFF: Central Texas, South Carolina, Pacific NW North Georgia, West Michigan, South Georgia Christina@rmnwitness.org Illinois Great Rivers, Iowa
  41. 41. [40] Helpful websites: The Love your Neighbor Campaign and resources: www.loveyourneighbor2012.org Coalition & General Conference Information: www.gc12.org Reconciling Ministries Network: www.rmnework.org Methodist Federation for Social Action: www.mfsaweb.org Affirmation: www.umaffirm.org

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