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Modern Agile Management and Leadership

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Modern Agile Management and Leadership

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What changes are needed in management and leadership to move towards the new lean culture of creative and knowledge work?

My presentation from Agile Finland's Modern Agile Breakfast.

What changes are needed in management and leadership to move towards the new lean culture of creative and knowledge work?

My presentation from Agile Finland's Modern Agile Breakfast.

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Modern Agile Management and Leadership

  1. 1. Modern Agile Management and Leadership
  2. 2. For many organizations, a common practice is that they are managed like machines. We call this Management 1.0. In this style of management, leaders assume that improvement of the whole requires monitoring, repairing, and replacing the parts.
  3. 3. Culture of Planning
  4. 4. Economies of Scale
  5. 5. Dividing responsibility and work
  6. 6. Executive Change Initiatives
  7. 7. Traditional management works well with predictable, repeatable work. It does not work with creativity, innovation and problem-solving.
  8. 8. https://www.constellationr.com/content/research-summary-sneak-peeks-constellations-futurist-framework-and-2014-outlook-digital
  9. 9. New companies disrupt markets http://fortune.com/2015/01/22/the-age-of-unicorns/
  10. 10. At the same time the nature of work, especially that of creative and knowledge work, has changed.
  11. 11. What you want to do as a company is maximize the number of experiments you can do per unit of time. - Jeff Bezos, Harvard Business Review Emerging: Experimentation
  12. 12. Emerging: Flow Efficiency
  13. 13. Emerging: Business Teams
  14. 14. Emerging: Continuous Improvement
  15. 15. Command-oriented, low-freedom management is common because it’s profitable, it requires less effort, and most managers are terrified of the alternative. - Laszlo Bock, Work Rules!
  16. 16. Some people think of an organization as a community or a city. You can do what you want, as long as you allow the community to benefit from your work. We call that Management 3.0.
  17. 17. In a community or city, everyone is (partly) responsible for contributing to its success and a few are responsible for the whole.
  18. 18. Management is about human beings. Its task is to make people capable of joint performance […]. Management is the critical, determining factor. - Peter Drucker, Management Rev. Edition
  19. 19. Management is Organizing the way work works in our company/team/organization
  20. 20. Management of the work is a crucial activity, but this could be done with or without dedicated managers. In fact, a business can do a lot of management with almost no managers!
  21. 21. Most creative workers don’t realize that they are also responsible for management stuff. Management is too important to leave to the managers.
  22. 22. Required awareness and trust Effectiveness High High Low
  23. 23. We get better, happier organizations by changing ourselves instead of others. When people don’t focus on improving themselves, is it any wonder they’re always complaining about each other?
  24. 24. Psychological safety and mutual trust are crucial prerequisites of effective collaboration.
  25. 25. Me You We Trust Identity Intention Listening Recognition Authenticity Honesty Purpose Shared understanding Continuous improvement Team learning Safety
  26. 26. Leadership is the act of creating safe spaces where people can collaborate effectively and meaningfully. It is not a position but activity!
  27. 27. More freedom and responsibility to the teams!
  28. 28. The expectation is that the frontline teams do everything, except for the things they choose to push upward. - Frédéric Laloux, Reinventing Organizations
  29. 29. The answer to the question “What is our business for?” is one of the first responsibilities of management. (A lack of direction is one of the most often-heard complaints from workers.) https://hbr.org/2015/06/the-top-complaints-from-employees-about-their-leaders
  30. 30. Purpose lies at the intersection of four circles: what you love doing, what you are good at, what the world needs, and what you are paid for. http://www.management- issues.com/opinion/7140/whats-the-purpose-of- your-business/
  31. 31. What could you start experimenting with in practice today? What could be the first step?
  32. 32. Next Management 3.0 Coaching Curriculum starts in November! 250€ off with code “AGILEFI” Sign up here: http://www.flowa.fi/management30/hinnat/
  33. 33. antti@flowa.fi @anttiki http://www.flowa.fi/management30/ Join the M3.0 meetup: http://tiny.cc/m30meetup Text: Antti Kirjavainen & Jurgen Appelo  Illustrations: Chad Geran  Design: Muuks

Notas do Editor

  • © 2016 Happy Melly One BV, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. This material is distributed only to licensed Management 3.0 facilitators of Happy Melly One BV.
    It is not permitted to use this material in training or workshops without reporting this to Happy Melly One BV and signing the license agreement.
    It is not permitted to redistribute the original files of this material, with exception of PDF files which can be distributed to class attendees and workshop participants.
    It is not permitted to reuse parts of this material in your own presentations or publications without permission. If you wish to license this material, please contact the Management 3.0 team at Happy Melly: info@management30.com
  • In the traditional business, acquiring knowledge was a matter of digesting the body of knowledge and best practices of your field and then applying them.
    The business environment was more stable which meant that most risks could be mitigated and opportunities could be seized by the way of careful planning.
    The body of knowledge of traditional software engineering and the project management institute are good examples of the culture of planning.
  • In the old business, in a world of stable markets, profits were driven by economies of scale.
    Producing products in big batches enabled driving down the unit cost, which increased the profit margin.
    It was hard to enter markets if you did not have enough capital to take advantage of economies of scale early on.

    Tayloristic management of factories which produce consumer goods is a good example of economies of scale.
  • In the old business, cost savings were driven by extreme specialization of work-force.
    For example, business analysts wrote requirements, programmers implemented those requirements into application code and testers tested if the application worked as planned.
    One extreme specialization was the coordinators, project managers and the sort, who specialized into coordinating the work as efficiently as possible.
    The thinking was, that people would become very efficient in their own specialized area of work.
  • In traditional management, the management sees the organization as a machine. If there is a problem in the performance of the organization, management must fix that like machines are fixed. Or even re-design it in a way that would allow for better performance.
    Good examples of this are new process rollouts and organizational resturcturings.
    In this thinking, the new way of working is rolled out in the organization. However, we have found out through many studies that these kind of engineered changes rarely have the intended effect.
  • Jotain uutta on nousemassa, jotain vanhaa saattaa olla kuolemassa
  • On yksisarvisia (esim. Uber, Airbnb), media-alan murros (FB, Google) mutta on myös muita:
    FAVI – autonosia
    AES – öljyala
    Wikipedia
    Morning Star - tomaatintuottajia
  • Uusien palveluiden lanseeraaminen asiakkaille, eism. Ylen Uutisvahti
    Nowadays, we have come to accept that we do not have perfect understanding of the outside world, the markets and the needs of the customers in our organization.
    There is much uncertainty that cannot be planned away.
    Instead we must learn by the culture of experimentation and accelerate our rate of learning about the markets, customers and technology to be able to seize the opportunities and mitigate the risks.
    Disciplines like Lean Startup and Growth Hacking are good examples of culture of experimentation.
  • Matkapuhelinoperaattori, uusien palveluiden lanseeraus
    Spearhead product Kanban (strategic media productions) + Yle Lab to shorten the feedback loops
    Nowadays, with more uncertainty in the business environment and the disruptions happening in the old markets, we cannot rely on the profit margin of economies of scale.
    It is no use to prematurely scale some product that might not end up having enough demand.
    Instead, companies nowadays try to optimize their time to market to be able to satisfy demand as quickly as they can.
    This is done by optimizing the lead time from idea to launch.
    Good examples of flow efficiency are agile software development practices such as Scrum and Kanban and lean product development.
  • Nykyisin tiimit haluavat UX-kehittäjien lisäksi digitaalisen markkinoinnin osaajat samaan tiimiin. Esim. Yle. Erilliset yksiköt historiaa.
    Nowadays, the need for flow efficiency meaning fast time to market and faster feedback and learning through experimentation mean that optimizing the whole instead of local optimizations have become more important.
    That is why companies have started to gather together cross-functional teams able to build products from idea to launch and who can make all the decisions all the way.
    These teams also work as the basic learning units for organizations.

  • What companies have started doing instead is to foster a culture of continuous improvement in every team and unit of the organization.
    Change is not seen as a project, but instead as a continuous process that will never end.
    Everybody takes responsibility to increase the performance of the organization.
    This kind of culture requires a shared understanding of goals, transparency of information, mutual trust and mandate to make decisions all around the organization.
  • Google’s research a year ago
    Anita Woolly’s team on MIT
    Johtaminen on turvallisten tilojen luomista tiimeille, jotta ne voivat yhdessä luoda jotain mahtavaa!
  • Sometimes referred to as “reverse delegation”.
    YLE: teams responsible for their business area, developing and marketing solutions
    Of course they choose and develop their own ways of working, too
    The team of teams responsible for intra-team allocation of resources, meaning budget
    Communication with upper management to talk about strategic objectives

    Gini: academies making all business decisions
  • Spearhead product Kanban in media production at Yle (what strategic media productions will be done in the next 2-3 years)

  • Also known as Ikigai: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ikigai

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