O slideshow foi denunciado.
Utilizamos seu perfil e dados de atividades no LinkedIn para personalizar e exibir anúncios mais relevantes. Altere suas preferências de anúncios quando desejar.

Tandem Transformational Game Design

230 visualizações

Publicada em

Tandem Design's goal is to help teams making transformational games maximize every team member's contribution, deeply ground their prototypes in theory, and have a clearer, more-shared game vision throughout their process. Tandem Design focuses on making to reflect and iterating on theory and related transformational goals.

Publicada em: Design
  • Login to see the comments

Tandem Transformational Game Design

  1. 1. TANDEM TRANSFORMATIONAL GAME DESIGN Carnegie Mellon Human Computer Interaction Institute PRESENTED BY ALEXANDRA TO (AATO@CS.CMU.EDU), ELAINE FATH, JESSICA HAMMER, GEOFF KAUFMAN
  2. 2. TANDEM TRANSFORMATIONAL GAME DESIGN (AKA TANDEM DESIGN)
  3. 3. GAME-DRIVEN GOAL DELINEATION 1. Iterating on Theory and Related Goals • Iteratively make clear, well-defined goals • Use this iterated theory to make more effective games
  4. 4. GOAL-DRIVEN GAME DESIGN 2. Anchoring Reflection Using Prototypes • Use game prototypes to ground reflection and discussion of goals • Use prototypes to inform understanding of theory
  5. 5. ALIGNMENT 3. Aligning the Team’s Shared Mental Model • Give an interdisciplinary team the tools to understand each other’s contributions • Evaluate both game and research artifacts as a group
  6. 6. THE 7 STEPS OF TANDEM DESIGN • Delineate Goals – define your transformational goals • Literature Review - understand and define your goals, ground them in literature on related theory • Iterate Delineation – repeat goal delineation loop • Align – ensure team is moving towards the same goal • Prototype – create playable prototypes • Playtest – play game prototypes early and often for feedback • Iterate Design – repeat game design loop
  7. 7. DEMONSTRATING TANDEM DESIGN THROUGH OUTBREAK E AC H S TAG E O F TAN D E M D E S I G N I S F L E X I B L E , T H E F O L L O W I N G AR E S AM P L E AC T I V I T I E S F O R E AC H S TAG E
  8. 8. OUTBREAK FINAL DESCRIPTION • Collaborative board game • Players explore a mad scientist’s mansion and hunt for the cure to a terrible outbreak • Players are uncertain what is in each room • Find out what is in the room by playing a 20-questions-like mini game • Game Goal: comfort asking questions, comfort with uncertainty
  9. 9. OUTBREAK VERSION 12 Demonstrated at Meaningful Play 2016
  10. 10. DELINEATING GOALS
  11. 11. OUTBREAK EXAMPLES DELINEATING GOALS SAMPLE ACTIVITIES • Set high-level goal of the game • Individually brainstorm sub- goals from the earlier lit review, collect and funnel as a group • After a playtest, re-center goal based on play dynamics • Set “increasing curiosity” goal • Extract from the literature through group playstorming “comfort with questions” • Set additional goal based on play “developing good questions
  12. 12. LITERATURE REVIEW
  13. 13. OUTBREAK EXAMPLES LITERATURE REVIEW SAMPLE ACTIVITIES • Take the goal, operationalize it through research literature • Take list of sub-goals and play dynamics, read literature on each for a deep-dive • Post-playtest, re-read literature to ensure that the theory implemented is true to what the literature says • One team member reviewed 15 papers on curiosity, team extracted a list of “curiosity” outcomes • Read literature on why question- asking is difficult and how it relates to curiosity • Re-read question literature and compare to play dynamics from playtest field notes
  14. 14. SAMPLE LOW-FI “RESEARCH ARTIFACT” FROM OUTBREAK, A LIST OF THEORIES AND OUTCOMES Theories Curiosity Outcomes Magic Circle Emotion Contagion Positive Valence/High Arousal Modeling Pluralistic Ignorance Collective/Social Identity Psychological Distancing Value/Role Consistency Imagining future and past selves Self-affirmation Compartmentalization of identity Growth Mindset Benevolent Masochism Misattribution of Arousal Increased tolerance for uncertainty Curiosity Contagion Failure is not a threat Search for unanswered questions Questions are normal
  15. 15. ITERATE OR ALIGN?
  16. 16. ITERATE OR ALIGN? SAMPLE QUESTIONS TO ASK • Do I know enough (bare minimum) to start making a playable prototype? • Do I need to understand the theory I’m trying to use more deeply? • Have I spent too much time on theory? Note: you should never spend too much time in a single loop
  17. 17. ALIGNMENT
  18. 18. OUTBREAK EXAMPLES ALIGNMENT SAMPLE ACTIVITIES • A group brainstorm of one- sentence game ideas based on reviewed literature • A team playtest of one member’s game prototype • A discussion of one specific theory and its relation to multiple prototypes • Six team members brainstormed 65 ideas, clustered into 15 high- level concepts • Outbreak prototype 1 designed by 2 team members, all 6 play the prototype to better eval. it • Discuss how growth mindset plays out in multiple prototypes
  19. 19. OUTBREAK EXAMPLE GAME IDEAS FROM ALIGNMENT #1 “A high-stress, escape the room game where you ask questions to find clues to escape while the board shrinks” “A deck-building game using positive self-affirmation and identity cards” “A role-playing spaceship game where you must complete your mission and fix the spaceship before it launches” Role-Playing Question-Asking Games About EmotionCaretaking Games
  20. 20. PROTOTYPING
  21. 21. OUTBREAK EXAMPLES PROTOTYPING SAMPLE ACTIVITIES • Script one single round of game play • Diverge and create two versions of the same game with one changed mechanic • Make a fully playable game in low-fi materials • Draft a rule list • Wrote a script of each question a sample player would ask and how other players would respond • Changed one mechanic to make question-asking round either timed or not timed • Draft a rule list that can be fully read and game playable for non- team members
  22. 22. PROTOTYPING Outbreak Version 5 Outbreak Version 8
  23. 23. PLAYTESTING
  24. 24. OUTBREAK EXAMPLES PLAYTESTING SAMPLE ACTIVITIES • Playtest just one mechanic or one round of game play with the internal team • Playtest the full game in the field with your target audience • Handoff the game to a group of colleagues to see how they play without facilitation • Team members try out a choose-your-own adventure mechanic, find that content generation is overwhelming • Field playtests at local afterschool programs with adolescent students • Handoff to a group of colleagues with instructions, observe and record playtest notes
  25. 25. ITERATE OR ALIGN?
  26. 26. TANDEM TRANSFORMATIONAL GAME DESIGN • Iterating on Theory • Questioning assumptions about our goals • Discovered a diverse set of sub-goals relevant to curiosity • Anchoring Reflection Using Prototypes • Articulated a relationship between curiosity and uncertainty • Kept multiple stakeholders on the same page • Alignment • Give an interdisciplinary team the tools to understand each other’s contributions • Evaluate both game and research artifacts as a group
  27. 27. TANDEM TRANSFORMATIONAL GAME DESIGN (AKA TANDEM DESIGN)
  28. 28. ABOUT THE PRESENTERS We are a research team at Carnegie Mellon University in the Human Computer Interaction Institute currently designing and studying game-based interventions. Alexandra To CMU HCII PhD Student Elaine Fath Schell Games Game Designer Jessica Hammer CMU HCII, ETC Faculty Geoff Kaufman CMU HCII Faculty
  29. 29. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thanks to the SCIPR (Sensing Curiosity in Play and Responding) project and co-PIs Justine Cassell, Jessica Hammer, and L.P. Morency, generously funded by the Heinz Family Foundation. We also thank Eda Zhang, Anny Fan, and Catherine Kildunne for their support in playtesting and designing Outbreak. To., A., Fath, E., Zhang, E., Ali, S., Kildunne, C., Fan, A., Hammer, J., Kaufman, G. (2016) “Tandem Transformational Game Design: A Game Design Process Case Study”, 2016 Meaningful Play. Carnegie Mellon Human Computer Interaction Institute tinyurl.com/tandemdesign alexandrato.com
  30. 30. TANDEM TRANSFORMATIONAL GAME DESIGN Carnegie Mellon Human Computer Interaction Institute PRESENTED BY ALEXANDRA TO (AATO@CS.CMU.EDU), ELAINE FATH, JESSICA HAMMER, GEOFF KAUFMAN

×