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design
c o m -
m u -
n ica -
t i o n
a d a m - s y k e s
1 4 0 1 1 8 1
solidworks portfolio
page seven
Decals
material textures
Page eight
Mates
backgrounds
a s s e m b ly
final images
climb on tin
bat signal
climb...
3 d + 2 d
s k e t c h i n g
p a g e - o n e
Introduction-
Throughout this module I have modelled seven
items found in my h...
l o f t s +
s w e e p s
p a g e - t w o
Lofting was at first difficult for me, as the lofts
were warping seemingly randoml...
p a g e - t h r e e
e x t r u d e +
f i l l e t / c h a m f e r
By far the most used feature, the extrusion and
cutting to...
d r a f t s - w r a p s
p a t t e r n s
p a g e - f o u r
To create the internal angled edge on the base of
the Bat-signal...
p a g e - f i v e
r i b - d o m e
s h e l l
Similar to drafting, the only place in which I found
need for a rib was in the...
r e v o l v e +
f l e x
p a g e - s i x
To create the climb on tin, its lid and the bottle of
Budweiser, I initially creat...
d e c a l s +
m at e r i a l - t e x t u r e s
p a g e - s e v e n
Before final assembly of the components to
create the d...
p a g e - e i g h tn
m a t e s +
b a c k g r o u n d s
In order to assemble the individual components
of each product, an ...
p a g e - n i n e
c l i m - o n - t i n
p a g e - t e n
b a t - s i g n a l
p a g e - e l e v e n
c l i m b i n g - b r u s h
p a g e - t w e l v e
b u d w e i s e r
a n g lo - a r m s - k n i f e
p a g e - t h i r t e e n
d m m - c a m
p a g e - f o u r t e e n
p a g e - f i f t e e n
d m m - c a m
p a g e - s i x t e e n
d m m - c a m
p a g e - s e v e n t e e n
k n i f e - s t a n d
p a g e - e i g t h t e e n
k n i f e - s t a n d
p a g e - n i n e t e e n
k n i f e - s t a n d
p a g e - t w e n t y
p a g e - t w e n t y - o n e
a l l
p a g e - t w e n t y - t w o
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  1. 1. design c o m - m u - n ica - t i o n a d a m - s y k e s 1 4 0 1 1 8 1 solidworks portfolio
  2. 2. page seven Decals material textures Page eight Mates backgrounds a s s e m b ly final images climb on tin bat signal climbing brush budweiser anglo arms knife dmm cam knife stand all 9 - 10 - 11- 12- 13- 14-17- 18-20- 21-22 Page one 2d+3d sketching page two Lofting -Boss and Cut Sweeps -Boss and Cut page three Extrude -Boss and Cut Fillets Chamfers page four Draft Wrap Pattern page five -Linear Circular rib dome shell Page six revolve flex construction c o n t e n t s
  3. 3. 3 d + 2 d s k e t c h i n g p a g e - o n e Introduction- Throughout this module I have modelled seven items found in my house, of which I found either interesting or saw possibilities to create them using different 3D modelling techniques. The items are: a tin of Climb On, a Batman toy light, a bouldering brush, a bottle of Budweiser with cap and bottle opener, an Anglo Arms Bowie knife, a DMM Dragon Cam and a Richardson Sheffield knife rack. With each model I aimed to not only increase the level of complexity but also to use different modelling features, with the final model using almost all of the skills I had learnt over the course of the module. The first thing I did with each model was to disassemble them as much as possible and then note down all the measurements into a note pad. I found that using digital callipers and recording all the dimensions in one go to be the best method for creating sketches as it meant I only had to look to the book for measurements, rather than taking a new one. Of all the 2D sketching done, the steel section of the Anglo Arms knife was the most complex, as it had many small features which all had to be in perfect relation to each other. To the right are a few screen shots of the sketch before it was extruded and cut. I found myself opting to keep sketches angular and the bevelling the edges ones extruded, as this helped keep dimensions accurate. However, with the Richardson Sheffield logo I used sketch fillets to round the corners to the correct radius before extrusion. I then used the sketch picture feature to trace the company logo and name which I then extruded outwards, creating a 3D logo. 3D sketching is a feature that took me a while to get to grips wot, as I found myself often sketching in the wrong planes. However I eventually became accustom to it and used it for the sketches which were swept on screws and knife blades. Though, sometimes with the knife blades I would simply create a new plane at the point of the blade.
  4. 4. l o f t s + s w e e p s p a g e - t w o Lofting was at first difficult for me, as the lofts were warping seemingly randomly, creating very different shapes to the desired ones. However, after using guide curves (as seen on the right) I was able to create the complex lofted bosses as seen on the Richardson knife handles, the bottle cap, the climbing brush and the spine of the cam. In addition to using the loft tool as an additive construction method, I also used lofted cuts to create the serrated edges of the breadknife and the Anglo Arms knife. On the right is an example of how I achieved this effect. I created a ‘D’ shape on the top of the blade and then created a plane ¾ of the way through the blade and drew an ‘O’ shape. Ones cut, the serrated scooped out shape was created. I then put an edge to both sides of the blades to create the sharp point of the serrations. Possibly the most useful feature I used on a regular bases throughout the modelling process was the swept boss and swept cut. As I modelled six knives in total, I used the swept cut feature with each blade to create more accurate chamfers than would be possible by simply using the chamfer tool. As can be seen with yellow preview cut on the orange blade, the bevelled edges of the knives tended to curve downwards towards the handle. This look could only be achieved by creating a guide curve on the plane of the blade and the sketching a ‘V’ at the point of the guide curve. I also used sweeps to create the keychain for the bottle opener and all the springs and wires found on the DMM cam. As well as when creating external threads on screws and the climbing brush. In conjunction to swept bosses, I used the sweep feature to cut internal threads on multiple features, such as the end cap for the climbing brush and the round bolt used to secure the knife stand together. I was initially confused by the feature as it seemed like it didn’t work, though I soon realised that I had ‘preview’ switched off. Once this was rectified I was able to create swept cuts with ease.
  5. 5. p a g e - t h r e e e x t r u d e + f i l l e t / c h a m f e r By far the most used feature, the extrusion and cutting tools were the backbone of the majority of the models I created. On the right is an example of the feature being used to extrude a simple 2D sketch into a three dimensional shape which, with a little more work, became a complex component. As can be seen with the grip of the cam (grey images on the right), a simple extruded shape with a few extruded cuts can be turned into a highly complex piece. With the addition of rounded bevels, the same component can then become ever more complicated and thus more realistic. In most components I used large bevels to round different sections and thus make them look better. In addition to large visible bevels I also applied tiny bevels, occasionally as small as 0.05mm to round the 90° edges of metal sections within both the knives and the cam. I did this because even though they appear to be perfect sharp angles, in reality there would always be a small amount of bevelling. Although tools exist to dome faces, I found that using the bevel tool gave the same result and was much quicker, as multiple faces can be selected and bevelled at once, with slight adjustments to the dimensions of the bevels creating the perfect shapes. I found myself using chamfers a lot less than bevelled edges, as the majority of the products I decided to model were predominantly smooth. However, I initially used chamfers to create the edges for the knives, but I then replaced them with swept cuts as this was more accurate to reality. Nevertheless, I found use for the chamfers on the blades. This is because most knife blades have large edges (the sections created with the swept cuts) yet these ‘V’ edges themselves are edged, and this is the actual cutting edge. For this I used the chamfer tool to chamfer the swept cuts. This can be seen more clearly with the coloured blades and the chamfered sections are the only sections of the blades to show the raw steel underneath the paint.
  6. 6. d r a f t s - w r a p s p a t t e r n s p a g e - f o u r To create the internal angled edge on the base of the Bat-signal I used the draft feature to join the face to the curved wall and the two ribs. Other than this one instance, I never found use for the draft feature again throughout the remaining products, however I have gained the skills to use the feature in the future with other products and designs. The wrap feature was another feature I had never really used before and when it came to putting a dimpled grip feature on the underside of the cams trigger I was at a quandary as the plane was curved so I couldn’t simply extrude a linear sketch pattern of the dots. After looking online I found a tutorial which showed me to create another plane directly above the surface I wanted to emboss, I then created a linear pattern of dots and selected the face I wished for the dots to be on, mirrored the sketched and wrapped it onto the surface. All that was left to do was to bevel the faces of the dots and turn them into domes. Another extremely useful set of features is the pattern tools. With these I was able to create 2D sketch patterns for objects like the bottle cap and the base of the bottle, which were then lofted and extruded respectively. In addition to using the circular and linear pattern tools on sketches, I used the ‘curved driven pattern’ tool to replicate the lofted cut of the breadknife serration along the slight curve of the blade. I used the same feature to replicate the serrations on the bowie knife, however in that case I used the standard ‘linear pattern’ tool, as that section of the knife wasn’t curved. When creating the repeated pattern on the edge of the cam lobes, I was unaware of the ‘curved driven pattern’ tool, and drew out each individual circle and ensured they were the right distance apart by using the smart dimension tool. This method took substantially longer, and I am happy I learned the more time efficient way.
  7. 7. p a g e - f i v e r i b - d o m e s h e l l Similar to drafting, the only place in which I found need for a rib was in the base of the Bat-signal. To do this I created a line on a sketch, bridging the face and the wall and then used the rib feature to create a 2mm rib, this was subsequently mirrored to the other side of the base. This is a feature I can see being extremely useful for modelling injection moulded parts, as ribs are commonly found inside said components. When it came to creating the screws for the knife holder, I initially thought about extruding a cylinder and bevelling it, but then I realised that the angle of the bevel was different from the angle of the screw head. My next thought was to draw a curved line and revolve cut the shape, as this would create the perfect angle. But due to the fact that I had already used the revolve tool prior to creating the screw, I wanted to try a different feature. The dome feature worked perfectly for this application, and was previously unknown to me. Shelling was a feature used only on the creation of the beer bottle and its cap. Just like with the swept cut, when I initially tried to shell the solid bottle to create a hollow shape, it didn’t seem to work. Once I had the preview button selected and watched a few tutorials online however, I was able to shell both the bottle itself and the more complex shape of the bottle cap.
  8. 8. r e v o l v e + f l e x p a g e - s i x To create the climb on tin, its lid and the bottle of Budweiser, I initially created a 2D sketch of half of the cross section of the product and then used the revolve feature to revolve the sketch 360° around a central line. With the Budweiser bottle, I only drew the external dimensions and revolved the product to create a solid bottle shape (this was because shelling the interior wold be easier than applying fillets to internal shapes). Whereas with the tin and the lid, I drew the entirety of the shape so that all I had to do once it was revolved was to fillet the sharp edges. This then left me with a simple but effective shape that looks identical to the real thing. When making the rear stand section for the knife stand, I initially planned on creating two rectangles on a sketch, with a 45° angle between them, and the extruding this shape out. However, this would have been very different to the way the actual product would have been made, so I researched how to bend a sheet on Solidworks, as in reality, the piece of acrylic would have been bent over a hot wire to form the bend. I then discovered the flex tool and was able to bend the whole piece (rather than using two pieces). The section I bent was the same as the clear front section, the reason they are identical apart from the curve is likely due to the fact it would be cheaper to produce the two sheets to the same dimensions and then bend one after.
  9. 9. d e c a l s + m at e r i a l - t e x t u r e s p a g e - s e v e n Before final assembly of the components to create the desired products, surface finishes and decals/stickers are applied to ensure the realism of the final rendered image. I used the decal feature for multiple products, including the logo and company name on the climbing brush, the lid sticker on the Climb On tin, the stickers on the Budweiser bottle, and decal on its lid, as well as on the side of each of the knives, which all had their company name on. The problem I was struck with at first was the fact that the decals were showing on the opposite side to the face that I applied them to. I later found out that this was due to the fact they were placed as projections rather than labels or stickers. Once this was rectified I was able to place them without them showing through the material. To crate the decal for the Climb on and the Sublime Climbing brush, I found images on the internet and then cropped out unnecessary parts of the images and transformed them into vectorised images. The main step to ensure realism was picking the correct material selection and its subsequent colour. This then made the products really come alive look dramatically more like their real life counterpart. To fully show off the different material finishes selected, different lighting and the angle of said lights was vital to highlighting specific things, such as the shine on a glossy product and the materials grain on a brushed aluminium product, such as the Climb on tin.
  10. 10. p a g e - e i g h tn m a t e s + b a c k g r o u n d s In order to assemble the individual components of each product, an assembly file is created to join them all together. After assembling the first few products, and having to spend a lot of time revolving the components using the triad to align the planes before applying mates. Because of this, in later models, I was conscious of the planes in which I created the components, as this made assembly much faster. The main way I assembled the different components was by using ‘standard mates’, this allowed me to alight faces with one another, to offset them by a specified angle and to use the concentric mate which aligned circular components within other circular components. This was most useful when assembling the cam on the right, ass almost all the components are based around central cylindrical shafts. Once the components were all joined together, the next thing to do was decide upon the background for the scene, the lighting and the camera angle. With most renders, I found that I preferred simple backgrounds of one colour, most often white, as this means that all focus is placed on the product, rather than what’s going on behind it. Yet, the ability to place a product into a real environment is advantageous to creating the photorealistic effect. To the right is an early example of this, with the knives and knife stand being positioned into an image of a real kitchen scene. After playing around with different lighting to highlight the specific material texture applied to the product, I have become much more competent at creating attractive, aesthetic renders of products using Photoview 360, my only regret is that I was unable to locate a version of Keyshot to render the models, as I have been informed that it is a superior software package.
  11. 11. p a g e - n i n e c l i m - o n - t i n
  12. 12. p a g e - t e n b a t - s i g n a l
  13. 13. p a g e - e l e v e n c l i m b i n g - b r u s h
  14. 14. p a g e - t w e l v e b u d w e i s e r
  15. 15. a n g lo - a r m s - k n i f e p a g e - t h i r t e e n
  16. 16. d m m - c a m p a g e - f o u r t e e n
  17. 17. p a g e - f i f t e e n
  18. 18. d m m - c a m p a g e - s i x t e e n
  19. 19. d m m - c a m p a g e - s e v e n t e e n
  20. 20. k n i f e - s t a n d p a g e - e i g t h t e e n
  21. 21. k n i f e - s t a n d p a g e - n i n e t e e n
  22. 22. k n i f e - s t a n d p a g e - t w e n t y
  23. 23. p a g e - t w e n t y - o n e a l l
  24. 24. p a g e - t w e n t y - t w o

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