Bootcamp nº3 energia de portugal 2015 version 1.5

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  • what are customers really willing to pay for? how? are you generating transactional or recurring revenues?

    Tipos de Fluxos de Rendimento: Venda, Taxa de Utilização, Assinaturas, Arrendamento, Licenciamento, Comissões, Publicidade, Freemium, etc.
  • A transaction based revenue model is the basic traditional revenue model for companies. It involves the customer paying a set fee for a transaction. There are a lot of variations available on this model and it is suited for commodity products or a completely customized service.

    One-time payment i.e. users buy a license to use e.g. Microsoft Office
  • A transaction based revenue model is the basic traditional revenue model for companies. It involves the customer paying a set fee for a transaction. There are a lot of variations available on this model and it is suited for commodity products or a completely customized service.

    One-time payment i.e. users buy a license to use e.g. Microsoft Office
  • The subscription business model is a business model where a customer must pay a subscription price to have access to the product/service. The model was pioneered by magazines and newspapers, but is now used by many businesses and websites.

    Rather than selling products individually, a subscription sells periodic (monthly or yearly or seasonal) use or access to a product or service, or, in the case of such non-profit organizations as opera companies or symphony orchestras, it sells tickets to the entire run of five to fifteen scheduled performances for an entire season. Thus, a one-time sale of a product can become a recurring sale and can build brand loyalty. It is used for anything where a user is tracked in both a subscribed and unsubscribed status.

    Membership fees to some types of organizations, such as trade unions, are also known as subscriptions.

    Industries that use this model include mail order book sales clubs and music sales clubs, cable television, satellite television providers with pay-TV channels, satellite radio, telephone companies, cell phone companies, internet providers, software providers, business solutions providers, financial services firms, fitness clubs, and pharmaceuticals, as well as the traditional newspapers, magazines and academic journals.

    Renewal of a subscription may be periodic and activated automatically, so that the cost of a new period is automatically paid for by a pre-authorized charge to a credit card or a checking account. In the U.S., recurring card charges must be disclosed in writing to the cardholder at least 10 days before each charge.[1]

    A common model on web sites, colloquially becoming known as the freemium model, is to provide content for free, but restrict access to premium features (for example, archives) to paying subscribers. It has also been described as ransomware. In this case, the subscriber-only content is said to be behind a paywall or - in a scholarly context - closed access, which alludes to the alternative model of open access. The razor and blades business model (also called the bait-and-hook model) is an attempt to approximate the subscription model, but without a formal agreement by both parties.
  • The subscription business model is a business model where a customer must pay a subscription price to have access to the product/service. The model was pioneered by magazines and newspapers, but is now used by many businesses and websites.

    Rather than selling products individually, a subscription sells periodic (monthly or yearly or seasonal) use or access to a product or service, or, in the case of such non-profit organizations as opera companies or symphony orchestras, it sells tickets to the entire run of five to fifteen scheduled performances for an entire season. Thus, a one-time sale of a product can become a recurring sale and can build brand loyalty. It is used for anything where a user is tracked in both a subscribed and unsubscribed status.

    Membership fees to some types of organizations, such as trade unions, are also known as subscriptions.

    Industries that use this model include mail order book sales clubs and music sales clubs, cable television, satellite television providers with pay-TV channels, satellite radio, telephone companies, cell phone companies, internet providers, software providers, business solutions providers, financial services firms, fitness clubs, and pharmaceuticals, as well as the traditional newspapers, magazines and academic journals.

    Renewal of a subscription may be periodic and activated automatically, so that the cost of a new period is automatically paid for by a pre-authorized charge to a credit card or a checking account. In the U.S., recurring card charges must be disclosed in writing to the cardholder at least 10 days before each charge.[1]

    A common model on web sites, colloquially becoming known as the freemium model, is to provide content for free, but restrict access to premium features (for example, archives) to paying subscribers. It has also been described as ransomware. In this case, the subscriber-only content is said to be behind a paywall or - in a scholarly context - closed access, which alludes to the alternative model of open access. The razor and blades business model (also called the bait-and-hook model) is an attempt to approximate the subscription model, but without a formal agreement by both parties.
  • Subscription model i.e. users pay a per month/per year e.g. book libraries, dropbox and other online storage sites, SAAS platforms, etc.
  • Firm or person (such as a broker or consultant) who acts as a mediator on a link between parties to a businessdeal, investment decision, negotiation, etc. In money markets, for example, banks act as intermediaries between depositors seeking interest income and borrowers seeking debt capital. Intermediaries usually specialize in specific areas, and serve as a conduit for market and other types of information. Also called a middleman. See also intermediation. Read more: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/intermediary.html#ixzz1vCn8FdvO
  • “Freemium” model. In this variation on the free model, used by LinkedIn and many other Internet offerings, the basic services are free, but premium services are available for an additional fee. This also requires a huge investment to get to critical mass, and real work to differentiate and sell premium services to users locked-in as free.
    Rather than selling products individually, a subscription sells periodic (monthly or yearly or seasonal) use or access to a product or service, or, in the case of such non-profit organizations as opera companies or symphony orchestras, it sells tickets to the entire run of five to fifteen scheduled performances for an entire season. Thus, a one-time sale of a product can become a recurring sale and can build brand loyalty. It is used for anything where a user is tracked in both a subscribed and unsubscribed status.


    A common model on web sites, colloquially becoming known as the freemium model, is to provide content for free, but restrict access to premium features (for example, archives) to paying subscribers. It has also been described as ransomware. In this case, the subscriber-only content is said to be behind a paywall or - in a scholarly context - closed access, which alludes to the alternative model of open access.

    Freemium: Free for basic, paid for premium services. E.g. sugarsync.com, linkedin, gmail, etc

    The “Freemium” model. Many software companies like LinkedIn and Dropbox offer a free, limited-functionality version of their product, hoping that some users will pay a premium for advanced features. The trick with this model is to offer just enough value in the free version so you attract (and hopefully lock in) regular users, and incrementally more value in the premium version so that you entice conversion and maximize cash flow. Your pricing must be a function of the incremental perceived value you offer: Can you convert 1,000 users at $100 per year? Or 10,000 users at $10 per year?
  • Cost-based model. In this more traditional product pricing model, the price is set at two to five times the product cost. If your product is a commodity, the margin may be as thin as ten percent. Use it when your new technology gives you a tremendous cost improvement. Skip it where there are many competitors.

    Cost-based model. Many consumer products sold through conventional distribution channels are priced at two to five times the production cost, depending on the industry. Margins are much thinner for commodities, of course. Multiples are used because the middlemen in the distribution channel, as well as the end retailer, all have standard markups. If you are selling into existing retail channels, this is a common pricing strategy.

    Cost Plus mode: where the seller decides the price of the product based on the cost of the product. This is usually done for physical goods e.g. shoes, garments, computers, pens, etc. Doing this model for online services is not feasible because there is no real cost of the physical goods. How much premium you can charge over the cost is dependent on a number of factors including competition, alternate options, the overall value-proposition that the customers see in your offering, and often, also the personality & equity of the brand


    Value model. If you can quantify a large value or cost savings to the customer, charge a price commensurate with the value delivered. This doesn’t work well with “nice to have” offerings, like social networks, but does work for new drugs that solve critical health problems.

    Value model. If you can make a clear case for the value your product offers to the customer, then you can price in proportion to the value. In some cases, the value could be monetary, as in savings: perhaps you have a SaaS solution that takes the place of traditional desktop software, and the end user saves on installation, ongoing maintenance and upgrade costs, and local storage requirements. Or perhaps the value is in terms of health benefits – maybe a new drug that can treat a disease faster, with fewer side effects. The key to value-based pricing is to demonstrate that you deliver considerably more value than available alternatives.

    For products or services that do not have an individual unit price [e.g. Microsoft Office software], the seller decides the price based on what they believe is possible to be charged from the consumer. This is the toughest part and may require some experimentation and in-market tests to arrive at the price point that you could charge.
  • Competitive positioning. In heavily competitive environments, the price has to be competitive, no matter what the cost or volume. This model is often a euphemism for pricing low in certain areas to drive competitors out, and high where competition is low. Competing on price alone is a good way to kill your startup.

    Market pricing. In highly competitive and minimally differentiated markets where competitors’ prices are visible to all market participants (like most products sold online), prices are set primarily by supply and demand. This takes into account shipping costs and sales taxes. You can earn a slight premium if you have a strong reputation (like Amazon), or if you can promise faster delivery, or if you offer a more liberal return policy. If you can’t justify pricing at a slight premium to the market, then you need to be the low-cost manufacturer or importer, or else you’ll compete yourself out of business.
  • Tiered or volume pricing. In certain product environments, where a given enterprise product may have one user or hundreds of thousands, a common approach is to price by user group ranges, or volume usage ranges. Keep the number of tiers small for manageability. This approach doesn’t typically apply to consumer products and services.

    Tiered or volume pricing. If your product is purchased in different quantities by different types of buyers, you can offer tiered pricing. This is very common for B2B sales of printed matter or for apparel. Depending on the industry, it might be something like a 10% price break for ordering 100+ units, and a 15% price break for ordering 500+ units. This can also apply, directly or indirectly, to certain consumer products and services: for example, the “buy 9 and get the 10th one free” punch card is volume pricing in disguise.

    Tiered or volume pricing: Typically used to group buying benefits. E.g. an enterprise software where the license fee per user reduces as more licenses get bought. The pricing in this model is often defined in slabs as relevant to the category.
  • Portfolio pricing. This model is relevant only if you have multiple products and services, each with a different cost and utility. Here your objective is to make money with the portfolio, some with high markups and some with low, depending on competition, lock-in, value delivered, and loyal customers. This one takes expert management to work.

    Portfolio pricing. If you offer a suite of products and services, each with a different cost and value to the customer, then you have an opportunity to offer a customized solution that maximizes the benefit to the customer at maximum profit to you. This strategy can become very complex very fast.

    Portfolio pricing or package price: This strategy is applicable when the seller has a range of products and/or services and may want to engage the consumer for the entire portfolio. E.g. Insurance companies which offer for corporates a portfolio comprising of life insurance + car insurance + fire insurance + health insurance
  • The razor and blades business model (also called the bait-and-hook model) is an attempt to approximate the subscription model, but without a formal agreement by both parties.

    Razor blade model. In this model, like cheap printers with expensive ink cartridges, the base unit is often sold below cost, with the anticipation of ongoing revenue from expensive supplies. This is another model that requires deep pockets to start, so is normally not an option for startups.

    Razor and blade model. This pricing model involves a reusable “base” component that you sell cheaply (or even give away) and a consumable component that must be replaced regularly. This is why ink jet printers are so cheap: they make their money on the ink. This can also be used with medical devices where a fresh, sterilized component must be used with each application. If you are selling the base unit at below cost, you obviously need a deep balance sheet.
  • Feature pricing. This approach works if your product can be sold “bare-bones” for a low price, and price increments added for additional features. It can be a very competitive approach, but the product must be designed and built to provide good utility at many levels. This is a very costly development, testing, documentation, and support challenge.

    Feature pricing. If your product or service can be configured to have a “base” model with a variety of optional upgrades, you can attract interested buyers with a low price on the bare-bones version and then upsell on the features. Anybody who has purchased a car or new home is very familiar with this technique. While this approach can be very profitable, you need to be careful not to alienate your customers by making them feel like they’ve been tricked. Consumer protection agencies are flooded with complaints against car sellers!
  • The same principle applies to numbers. Dehaene, Bossini and Giraux (1991) found that people conceptualize numbers on an imaginary horizontal line, with numbers growing larger from left to right.
    In their study, they presented participants with digits ranging from 0 and 9, and they asked participants to indicate its parity (i.e., whether it was odd or even). As expected, people responded faster to smaller numbers when using their left hand (and vice versa). In other words, people responded faster with the hand that matched the same side of their mental ruler.
    How does that finding relate to pricing?
    Since we conceptualize smaller numbers as belonging on the left, positioning prices toward the left can trigger people’s conceptualization for a smaller magnitude, thus altering their perception of your price (Coulter, 2002).
    Since we can also associate numbers with a vertical magnitude (with smaller numbers positioned toward the bottom), you might want to position your prices toward the bottom-left.
  • Besides font size and kerning, another consideration is punctuation. Researchers found that removing commas (e.g., $1,499 vs. $1499) can influence people to perceive your price to be lower (Coulter, Choi, and Monroe, 2012).
  • For example, Coulter and Coulter (2005) presented participants with various descriptions for an inline skate. Some descriptions emphasized a “Low Friction” benefit. Other descriptions emphasized a “High Performance” benefit.
    Even though participants rated those benefits as equally important, participants were more favorable toward the price when the description contained “Low Friction.”
    When you choose the language near your price, choose words that are “congruent” with a small value (e.g., “low,” “small,” “tiny”).
  • Thomas, Simon, and Kadiyali (2007) analyzed 27,000 real estate transactions. What did they find? Buyers pay more money when prices are specific (e.g., $362,978 vs. $350,000).
    Is it because of the negotiation aspect? If someone asks for a very specific price, wouldn’t potential buyers perceive less room to negotiate?
    That’s what I thought. But nope. Researchers ruled out that possibility. Surprisingly, the real culprit involved priming a small magnitude.
    Think about it. When are you more likely to use a precise value? Answer: when you’re dealing with small numbers (e.g., 1, 2, 3).
    Due to the association between precise numbers and small values, precise numbers trigger an association with small values, thus influencing people’s perception.
  • Due to anchoring, it’s no shocker that sellers can get more money by starting negotiations with a high initial offer (Galinsky & Mussweiler, 2001). That high number establishes an anchor point, pulling the final settlement closer to that range.
    Not only should you start with a high initial price, but you should also use a precise value. In one study, Janiszewski and Uy (2008) asked participants to estimate the actual price of a plasma TV based on the suggested retail price — either $4,998, $5,000, or $5,012.
    When participants were given precise values ($4,998 and $5,012), they estimated the TV’s actual price to be closer to that range. When the suggested price was rounded ($5,000), participants believed the actual price to be much lower.
  • Nunes and Boatwright (2004) tested that possibility. On a popular boardwalk in West Palm Beach, the researchers sold music CDs. Every 30 minutes, the adjacent vendor alternated the price of a sweatshirt on display — either $10 or $80.
    What happened? You guessed it. The sweater’s price anchored people toward the respective ends of the price spectrum. When the price of the sweatshirt was $80, shoppers paid higher prices for the CDs.
    If you’re selling items on eBay, you might want to mention some of the other items you have for sale (the more expensive items, of course).
  • Baker, Marn, and Zawada (2010) suggest raising the price of your old product. By raising the price, you raise people’s reference price (thereby enhancing the perceived value of your new product). You’ll be releasing the new product into more favorable conditions.
    Conversely, if you lower the price of your old product, you set yourself up for failure. You’ll reinforce a lower reference price, which will make your new product seem more expensive.
  • which activities do you need to perform well in your business model? what is crucial?
  • Caranguejos
  • Churn rate, when applied to a customer base, refers to the proportion of contractual customers or subscribers who leave a supplier during a given time period. It is a possible indicator of customer dissatisfaction, cheaper and/or better offers from the competition, more successful sales and/or marketing by the competition, or reasons having to do with the customer life cycle.
  • which resources underpin your business model? which assets are essential?

    Exemplos de Recursos: Físicos, Intelectuais, Humanos e Financeiros.
  • which partners and suppliers leverage your model? who do you need to rely on?
  • Avaliar necessidade de ter uma avaliação para B2B e uma outra para B2C.
  • Bootcamp nº3 energia de portugal 2015 version 1.5

    1. 1. Copyright Fábrica de Startups S.A. Sessão nº3 17 de Novembro de 2015
    2. 2. Semana 3 16 a 20 de Novembro 2ª 3ª 4ª 5ª 6ª 10:00-11:00 Fontes de Receitas Validação das Fontes de Receitas 11:00-12:00 12:00-13:00 13:00-14:00 14:00-15:00 Startup Killer Actividades e Recursos Chave 15:00-16:00 Lessons Learned 16:00-17:00 17:00-18:00 Orador Convidado 18:00-19:00 19:00-20:00
    3. 3. 10:00 Introdução 10:15 Fontes de Receita 11:00 Psicologia dos Preços 11:45 Coffee-break 12:00 Actividades Chave 13:15 Almoço 14:30 Startup Killer 15:00 Recursos Chave 15:30 Parceiros Chave 16:00 Perguntas e Respostas 16:30 Próximos Passos Agenda
    4. 4. Introdução 4
    5. 5. Segmentos de Clientes Parceiros Chave Estrutura de Custos Fontes de Receita Canais Relacionamento com Clientes Actividades Chave Recursos Chave Proposta de Valor 5
    6. 6. Tela de Modelo de Negócio 6
    7. 7. Business Model Design Kit
    8. 8. Desenvolvimento de Clientes 8 Descobrir Clientes pesquisa Validar Clientes Criar Clientes Crescer Empresa execução
    9. 9. Desenhar o Modelo 9
    10. 10. Definir Hipóteses 10
    11. 11. Os diferentes níveis Desenho do Modelo Estabelecer as Hipóteses Testar as Hipóteses 12
    12. 12. Processo de Validação 1) Desenhar Modelo 2) Definir Hipóteses 3) Prioritizar Hipóteses 4) Testar Hipótese 5) Analisar Resultados Copyright Fábrica de Startups 13
    13. 13. Hipótese • Acredito que [segmento de mercado] irá [fazer esta acção / utilizar este solução] quando [esta experiência] tiver [este resultado]. Copyright Fábrica de Startups 14
    14. 14. 15
    15. 15. 16
    16. 16. Quadro de Validação (Quadro de Validação) Copyright Fábrica de Startups 17
    17. 17. Como Testar as Hipóteses? • Entrevistas • Sondagens através de email ou telefone • Adwords • Landing Page • A/B Testing • Protótipo • Venda à consignação • Venda porta-a-porta • Plataformas de Crowdfunding • Wizard of Oz • Lojas Electrónicas 18Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    18. 18. Elevator Pitch • [nome do produto ou serviço] ajuda o [segmento de mercado] a resolver o [problema] utilizando [a solução] que é melhor do que [concorrentes] porque [atributos distintivos]. Copyright Fábrica de Startups 19
    19. 19. Fontes de Receita 20
    20. 20. Fontes de Receitas • Quais os tipos de fontes de receitas? • Quais os modelos de pricing? • Quanto é que os clientes estão dispostos a pagar? • Qual o contributo de cada fluxo para o rendimento total? 21
    21. 21. Business Model Design Kit
    22. 22. Venda 24 17.800 €
    23. 23. Transaction 25 1.230.000 €
    24. 24. Arrendamento de imóveis (e aluguer de veículos) Copyright Fábrica de Startups 26
    25. 25. Licenciamento Copyright Fábrica de Startups 27
    26. 26. Assinatura Copyright Fábrica de Startups 29
    27. 27. Assinatura Copyright Fábrica de Startups 30
    28. 28. Assinatura $29 x 12 x 1000 = $358.000 Copyright Fábrica de Startups 31
    29. 29. Comissão de intermediação Copyright Fábrica de Startups 32
    30. 30. Publicidade Copyright Fábrica de Startups 33
    31. 31. Arrendamento mercantil ou Leasing 34
    32. 32. Venda de Horas 35
    33. 33. Comissão 36 Source:Homehunting.pt
    34. 34. Patrocínios 37
    35. 35. Participação no sucesso 38
    36. 36. Pagamento por volume utilizado Copyright Fábrica de Startups 39
    37. 37. Pre-Pagamento Copyright Fábrica de Startups 40
    38. 38. Freemium Copyright Fábrica de Startups 41
    39. 39. Freemium Copyright Fábrica de Startups 42
    40. 40. Receitas Indirectas • Receitas por referenciamento • Receitas de afiliados • Venda de dados Copyright Fábrica de Startups 43
    41. 41. Referral Revenues Copyright Fábrica de Startups 44
    42. 42. Referral Revenues 45
    43. 43. Affiliate Revenue Copyright Fábrica de Startups 47
    44. 44. Affiliation Programs (1 de 2) Copyright Fábrica de Startups 48 https://affiliate-program.amazon.com/
    45. 45. Affiliation Programs (2 de 2) Copyright Fábrica de Startups 49 http://www.spreadshirt.com/
    46. 46. Selling Data Copyright Fábrica de Startups 50
    47. 47. Copyright Fábrica de Startups 51 55 Maneiras de Fazer Dinheiro
    48. 48. Discover Your Information Publishing Possibilities Copyright Fábrica de Startups 52 Fonte: “55 Time-Tested Information Programs and Products”, John Eggen, Copyright Mission Possible
    49. 49. Exercício • Definir três fontes de receita adicionais para o vosso projecto.
    50. 50. Tempo Disponível 10 Minutos Copyright Fábrica de Startups 2015 54
    51. 51. Apresentações 55
    52. 52. Psicologia dos Preços 56
    53. 53. Modelos de Pricing • Cost Based Pricing – Pricing Baseado no Custo • Value Based Pricing – Pricing baseado no Valor • Competitive Pricing – Pricing competitivo • Volume Pricing – Pricing de volume • Portfolio Pricing – Pricing de carteira (Bundling) • “Shaver” Price – Pricing “máquina de barbear” • Feature Pricing – Pricing pelas características Copyright Fábrica de Startups 57
    54. 54. Abordagens Comuns • Custo + Margem • Centrado em aspectos economicos e internos, e não no cliente • Usa um multiplicador: por exemplo 3 vezes mais do que o custo (de 2 a 5 vezes) Cost Based • Determinado pela percepção de valor do cliente • A solução acrescenta valor para além das outras alternativas Value Based Copyright Fábrica de Startups 58
    55. 55. Competitive Price Copyright Fábrica de Startups 59
    56. 56. Volume Price Copyright Fábrica de Startups 60
    57. 57. Portfolio Price 61 www.appsumo.com
    58. 58. “Shaver” Price Copyright Fábrica de Startups 62
    59. 59. Feature Pricing Copyright Fábrica de Startups 63
    60. 60. Video 64 Psychology of Pricing
    61. 61. Tácticas de Pricing Source: http://www.nickkolenda.com/psychological-pricing-strategies/#pricing-s5-t15
    62. 62. Tactica 1: Reduzir o dígito da esquerda de um
    63. 63. Tactica 2: Usar o valor correcto de “arredondamento”
    64. 64. Tactica 3: Escolher numeros com menos sílabas
    65. 65. Tactica 4: Manter separado o valor do envio e manuseamaneto Discoveries
    66. 66. Tactica 5: Oferecer pagamentos em prestações 70
    67. 67. Tactica 6: Referir o valor equivalente por dia 71
    68. 68. Tactica 7: Colocar o preço na zona de baixo à esquerda 72
    69. 69. Tactica 8: Usar letra de tamanho menor 73
    70. 70. Tactica 9: Retirar o separador entre os milhares e centenas quando possível 74
    71. 71. Copyright Fábrica de Startups S.A. Sessão nº3 17 de Novembro de 2015
    72. 72. Tactica 10: Usar linguagem “Congruente” 76
    73. 73. Tactica 11: Ser preciso com valores elevados 77
    74. 74. Tactic 12: Começar uma negociação com um valor alto, preciso 78
    75. 75. Tactica 12: Começar uma negociação com um valor alto, preciso 79
    76. 76. Tactica 13: Mostrar ao cliente um valor comparativo superior 80
    77. 77. Tactica 14: Mostrar ao cliente um qualquer valor alto 81
    78. 78. Tactica 15: Aumentar o preço do seu produto anterior 82
    79. 79. Tactica 16: Distinguir visualmente quando comparando com um valor mais alto 83
    80. 80. Tactica 17: Apresentar um produto isca 84
    81. 81. Tactica 17: Apresentar um produto isca 85
    82. 82. Tactica 17: Apresentar um produto isca 86
    83. 83. Exercício • Definir o preço para cada uma das Fontes de Receita do vosso projecto. • Verificar a consistência com a Lista de Tácticas de Pricing e fazer os ajustamentos necessários. 87
    84. 84. Exercício 15 Minutos 88
    85. 85. Apresentações 89
    86. 86. Coffe Break 15 Minutos 90
    87. 87. Actividades Chave 91
    88. 88. Actividades Chave • Quais as actividades críticas exigidas pelo Modelo de Negócio? • Como podem ser optimizadas? • Quais as que podem ser automatizadas? • Quais as que podem ser subcontratadas? 92
    89. 89. Porque a maioria dos negócios não funciona e o que fazer para resolver esse problema Why Most Businesses Don’t Work and What To Do About It Copyright Fábrica de Startups 93
    90. 90. Copyright Fábrica de Startups 94
    91. 91. Mito do Empreendedor Copyright Fábrica de Startups 95 Empreendedor Gestor Técnico 10% 20% 70%
    92. 92. Mito do Empreendedor Copyright Fábrica de Startups 96 Empreendedor Gestor Técnico 33% 33% 33%
    93. 93. Work ON it not IN it
    94. 94. “You have to build a system where ordinary people can produce extraordinary results” Micheal Geber, The E-Myth, 1985 Copyright Fábrica de Startups 98
    95. 95. A máquina de criar valor 99
    96. 96. Cadeia de Valor Copyright Fábrica de Startups 100 Actividades de Suporte Actividades Principais Sequencia no tempo
    97. 97. Cadeia de Valor (Michael Porter) Copyright Fábrica de Startups 101
    98. 98. Cadeia de Valor Copyright Fábrica de Startups 102 Gestão Financeiras e Contabílistica Gestão de Recursos Humanos Infraestrutura Sistemas Informáticos Desenvolvimento deClientes Marketing Vendas Operações Suporte Actividades de Suporte Actividades Principais
    99. 99. Exercício 103Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    100. 100. Exercício Definir a Cadeia de Valor associada ao modelo de negócio de cada equipa. 104Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    101. 101. Cadeia de Valor Copyright Fábrica de Startups 105 Actividades de Suporte Actividades Principais
    102. 102. Tempo 10 Minutos 106Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    103. 103. Apresentações 107Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    104. 104. Legos Copyright Fábrica de Startups 108
    105. 105. Star Wars Shuttle Copyright Fábrica de Startups 109
    106. 106. Qual a equipa que irá construir a melhor réplica do Star Wars Shuttle? Equipa A □ Equipa B □ Copyright Fábrica de Startups 110
    107. 107. www.methodus.com 111
    108. 108. Checklist Manifesto 112
    109. 109. www.methodus.com 113
    110. 110. Exemplo de Cadeia de Valor 114
    111. 111. Definição de Processo 115 Colecção de actividades inter-relacionadas, iniciada em resposta a um evento e que produz o resultado esperado pelo cliente do processo. Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    112. 112. (Stress Picture) 116 Sem Processos
    113. 113. Com Processos 117Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    114. 114. Exercício Identificar os dez processos mais importantes para a operacionalização do seu modelo de negócio. 118
    115. 115. Tempo 5 Minutos 119Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    116. 116. Apresentações 120Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    117. 117. Desenho de Processo 121Copyright Fábrica de Startups Início ou Input Acção Decisão Sim / Não Fim do processo/ Ligação a outro processo Fluxo do processo
    118. 118. Desenho de Processo Copyright Fábrica de Startups 123
    119. 119. Diagrama de Processo 124Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    120. 120. 125
    121. 121. Automatização Copyright Fábrica de Startups 126
    122. 122. Exercício 127Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    123. 123. Exercício • Desenhar um dos principais processos do modelo de negócio de cada equipa. 128Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    124. 124. Formulário de Processo Copyright Fábrica de Startups 129
    125. 125. Desenho de Processo 130Copyright Fábrica de Startups Início ou Input Acção Decisão Sim / Não Fim do processo/ Ligação a outro processo Fluxo do processo
    126. 126. Tempo 10 Minutos 131Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    127. 127. Apresentações 132Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    128. 128. Top 10 dos Processos 133Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    129. 129. Process Classification Framework Fonte: APQC 134
    130. 130. 3.0 Market and Sell Products and Services 135
    131. 131. Top 10 1. Definir Plano Estratégico 2. Monitorizar Execução do Plano Estratégico 3. Realizar Campanhas de Marketing 4. Implementar “Sales Machine” 5. Realizar Operações 6. Apoiar Clientes 7. Avaliar Satisfação dos Clientes 8. Gerir Tesouraria 9. Recrutar Colaboradores 10.Avaliar Colaboradores Copyright Fábrica de Startups 136
    132. 132. Startup Killer 139
    133. 133. Problema Copyright Fábrica de Startups 140
    134. 134. Solução Copyright Fábrica de Startups 141
    135. 135. Valor do Ciclo de Vida do Cliente (Customer Lifetime Value) • CLV = RMPC * (1 / taxa de atrito) • Valor do Ciclo de Vida do Cliente é calculado multiplicando a Receita Média por Cliente (RMPC) pela duração média da relação da empresa com os clientes. A duração da relação é calculada dividindo 1 pela Taxa de Atrito (Churn) durante o período. Copyright Fábrica de Startups 142
    136. 136. Estimativa do Valor • Exemplo em que o período é um ano: • 1000 clientes novos (não incluindo utilizadores grátis) • 25.000 € de receitas. • Isto significa que a receita média por clientes é de 25.000 / 1000 = 25 €. • Se a taxa de atrito for 20% então a duração média é de 5 anos e o Valor do Ciclo de Vida do Cliente é: • CLV = 25 € * (1 / 0.2) = 125 €. Copyright Fábrica de Startups 143
    137. 137. Exercício 144
    138. 138. Exercício • Calcular o Valor do Ciclo de Vida do Cliente associado ao modelo de negócio de cada equipa.
    139. 139. Apresentações
    140. 140. Custo de Aquisição de Clientes (Customer Acquisition Cost) • CAC = Custos / Clientes • Custo de Aquisição de Clientes (CAC) é calculado adicionando todos os custos associado às actividades comerciais (salários, marketing, hosting) durante um determinado período de tempo e dividindo o resultado pelo número de clientes adquiridos nesse mesmo período de tempo. Copyright Fábrica de Startups 148
    141. 141. Estimativa de Custos • Exemplo em que o período é um ano: • 1000 clientes novos (não incluindo utilizadores grátis) • 15.000 € custos de marketing e 30.000 € custos em salários e benefícios. • CAC = 45.000 € / 1000 = 45 € Copyright Fábrica de Startups 149
    142. 142. Exemplo nº2 (Site na Internet) Copyright Fábrica de Startups 150 http://www.forentrepreneurs.com/startup-killer/
    143. 143. Exemplo nº2 (Força de Vendas) Copyright Fábrica de Startups 151 http://www.forentrepreneurs.com/startup-killer/
    144. 144. Exercício 152
    145. 145. Exercício • Calcular o Custo de Aquisição de Clientes associado ao modelo de negócio de cada equipa.
    146. 146. Tempo 10 Minutos
    147. 147. Apresentações
    148. 148. Ferramenta Copyright Fábrica de Startups 156 http://http://www.panalysis.com/resources/customer-acquisition-cost#/calculator Neste caso o valor resultante é: $13,33 (Website Development Costs / Expected life of website) + Monthly Promotion Costs + Monthly Maintenance Costs New Customers
    149. 149. Recursos Chave 157
    150. 150. Recursos Chave • Quais os recursos críticos? • Quais as características dos recursos críticos? • Como obter os recursos críticos? • Como manter os recursos críticos? 158
    151. 151. Organigrama DG Marketing & Vendas Assistente de Marketing Comercial Operações Processos Qualidade F&C Contabilidade Tesouraria Copyright Fábrica de Startups 159
    152. 152. Descrição da Posição Posição/Cargo Principais Objectivos Tarefas Estratégicas Tarefas Tácticas Normas Copyright Fábrica de Startups 160
    153. 153. Exemplo de Descrição da Posição Posição/Cargo Director Comercial Principais Objectivos ___ K de Volume de Negócios, com uma margem mínima de ___%. Conquista de __ novos clientes. Taxa de Abandono (Churn) inferior a __ %. Tarefas Estratégicas Identificação de Alvos. Planeamento de Actividades dos Colaboradores Subordinados. Criação de Planos de Acção ou Desenho de Processos de Negócio. Avaliação do Desempenho dos Colaboradores Subordinados. Tarefas Tácticas Promoção da oferta nos mercados de actuação, Realização de Visitas Executivas, Participação em Eventos, Realização de Reuniões para Levantamento de Necessidades, Realização de Apresentações e Demonstrações, Elaboração de Propostas, Negociação e Contratação de Projectos. Normas Utilização da metodologia da Methodus, denominada Methodus Sales Process (MSP) Registo de todos os suspeitos, contactos, oportunidades, propostas, contractos e projectos no MS-CRM Copyright Fábrica de Startups 161
    154. 154. Exercício 162Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    155. 155. Exercício • Definir o organigrama associado ao modelo de negócio de cada equipa. 163Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    156. 156. Organigrama Copyright Fábrica de Startups 164
    157. 157. Tempo 10 Minutos 165Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    158. 158. Apresentações 166
    159. 159. Parceiros Chave 167
    160. 160. Parceiros Chave • Quem são os nossos parceiros e fornecedores críticos? • Quais os recursos chave que estamos a adquirir a fornecedores ou parceiros? • Que tipos de parcerias?
    161. 161. Tipos de Parcerias • Alianças estratégicas entre empresas complementares • Cooperação entre empresas concorrentes • Joint-ventures para desenvolver novos negócios • Relações comprador-fornecedor para assegurar fornecimentos estratégicos Copyright Fábrica de Startups 169
    162. 162. Motivações • Economias de escala • Redução do risco e da incerteza • Aquisição de recursos ou actividades • Redução do custo de internacionalização Copyright Fábrica de Startups 170
    163. 163. Exercício 171Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    164. 164. Exercício • Definir os parceiros e tipos de parcerias relacionados com o Modelo de Negócio de cada equipa. 172Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    165. 165. Tempo 5 Minutos 173Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    166. 166. Apresentações 174Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    167. 167. Perguntas e Respostas 175
    168. 168. Próximos Passos 176
    169. 169. Home Work • Actualizar o Modelo de Negócios em função dos resultados dos testes • Identificar ou actualizar as principais hipóteses • Realizar entrevistas e sondagens • Criar o Protótipo 2.0 • Preparar a apresentação “Lessons Learned” • Actualizar o Quadro de Validação 178Copyright Fábrica de Startups
    170. 170. Material de Referência • Summary of 'The Mom Test‘: http://www.slideshare.net/xamde/summary-of-the-mom-test • Mom Test - Customer Development: http://www.slideshare.net/robfitz/mom-test-customer-development-30m • BMC Channels https://www.udacity.com/course/viewer#!/c-ep245/l-48722304/m-48716274 • BMC Customer Relationships: https://www.udacity.com/course/viewer#!/c- ep245/l-48722304/m-48712363 • The Ultimate Guide to Minimum Viable Products http://scalemybusiness.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-minimum-viable-products/ • The Achilles Heel of Customer Development http://leanstack.com/customer- development-getting-started/ • 26 Resources to Help You Master Customer Development Interviews https://blog.kissmetrics.com/26-customer-development-resources/ 180

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