Panorama internacional da arte eletrônica

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aula expositiva para a disciplina de Arte Eletrônica, do curso de Artes Visuais da Universidade de Brasília.

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  • Colaboração e participação Apropriação e código aberto – Piratão, Cine Falcatrua, Jarbas Paródia corporativa – Freakpedia Hackerismo e hacktivismo – Ônibus Hacker, Thacker Intervenções - GB Identidade – Marcelo do Campo Telepresença e vigilância – Corpos Informáticos, Lucas Bambozzi
  • The UMBRELLA.net system works with a hardware and software component that is integrated into the design of a typical umbrella. By embedding the system into an everyday object, our intent is to lessen the point of entry for people using the system as they are already familiar with the object and how it works. The prototype includes handheld PocketPC (iPaq) computers that will interface to the umbrella and only communicate with each other when the need exists: ie. When rain is present and other nodes exist in close proximity. The current version of UMBRELLA.net includes 10 Bluetooth-equipped umbrellas each with an accompanying Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) that is running the networking software. When opened, the hardware on the umbrellas communicates to the PDAs to initiate a network connection.
  • a large-scale concert performance whose sounds are wholly produced through the carefully choreographed ringing of the audience’s own mobile phones. Before the concert, participants register their mobile phone numbers at a series of web terminals; in exchange, new ringtone melodies are automatically transmitted to their phones, and their seating assignment tickets are generated. During the concert, the audience’s phones are dialed up by live performers, using custom software which permits as many as 60 phones to ring simultaneously. Because the exact location and tone of each participant’s mobile phone is known in advance, the Dialtones concert is able to present a diverse range of unprecedented sonic phenomena and musically interesting structures, such as waves of polyphony which cascade across the audience. Dialtones was presented at the Ars Electronica Festival in September 2001, and at the Swiss National Exposition in May and June of 2002.
  • a large-scale concert performance whose sounds are wholly produced through the carefully choreographed ringing of the audience’s own mobile phones. Before the concert, participants register their mobile phone numbers at a series of web terminals; in exchange, new ringtone melodies are automatically transmitted to their phones, and their seating assignment tickets are generated. During the concert, the audience’s phones are dialed up by live performers, using custom software which permits as many as 60 phones to ring simultaneously. Because the exact location and tone of each participant’s mobile phone is known in advance, the Dialtones concert is able to present a diverse range of unprecedented sonic phenomena and musically interesting structures, such as waves of polyphony which cascade across the audience. Dialtones was presented at the Ars Electronica Festival in September 2001, and at the Swiss National Exposition in May and June of 2002.
  • Carnivore é uma ferramenta de espionagem de redes de transmissão de dados do FBI. O coletivo Radical Software Group propõe então uma versão pessoal CarnivorePE, capaz de rastrear o tráfego de internet (web, e-mail, ftp, etc.) em uma rede específica. Os dados captados são então utilizados para interfaces gráficas chamadas clientes, que apresentam animações e gráficos com os diagnósticos obtidos. O código aberto, escrito em Processing, pode ser baixado pela internet.
  • O primeiro cliente foi chamado de Carnivore Personal Edition Zero Client (número de série RSG-CPE0C-1). Foi desenvolvido em linguagem Perl pelo RSG e rodou em um terminal a partir de um servidor Linux. A trilha sonora utilizada foi apropriada do videogame Half-Life.
  • Outros artistas desenvolveram clientes: Joshua Davis/BrandenHall/Shapeshifter
  • Read every bit of cnn.com. 0 moves black horizontally. 1 moves white vertically. Black and white attract to one another.
  • Read every bit of cnn.com. 0 moves black horizontally. 1 moves white vertically. Black and white attract to one another.
  • World Wall Painters (Pintores de Muros Mundiais) é um cliente que explora a informações geográficas dos Ips rastreados pelo Carnivore. O interface marca a bandeira dos países envolvidos no tráfego de informação, resultando em uma colagem de texturas que sugerem a heterogeneidade da internet.
  • World Wall Painters (Pintores de Muros Mundiais) é um cliente que explora a informações geográficas dos Ips rastreados pelo Carnivore. O interface marca a bandeira dos países envolvidos no tráfego de informação, resultando em uma colagem de texturas que sugerem a heterogeneidade da internet.
  • Synopsis: JJ is a software agent which uses facial expressions to visualize the emotional content of network traffic. Serving as both a network surveillance tool and an empathic information visualization, JJ is implemented as a Carnivore Client, an open-source format for network surveillance applications. JJ is an autonomous software agent who displays facial expressions appropriate to the emotional content of the words that are presented to him. Implemented as a Carnivore Client, JJ literally "puts a face" on the information transmitted through his host network, in order to provide a data visualization of the network's "emotional content." JJ operates according to a mapping established between two well-known psychological databases: (A) Ekman and Friesen's set of "universal facial expressions" — the set of face photographs which have been shown to embody basic cross-cultural human emotions (namely: anger, fear, surprise, disgust, sadness and pleasure) — and (B) the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) dictionary by Pennebaker, Francis, & Booth, which categorizes the "emotional associations" of several thousand common English words, and provides an efficient and effective method for evaluating the various affective components present in verbal and written speech samples.
  • PoliceState is a Carnivore client that attempts to reverse the surveillance role of law enforcement into a subservient one for the data being gathered. The client consists of a fleet of 20 radio controlled police vehicles that are all simultaneously controlled by data coming into the main client. The client looks for packet information relating to domestic US terrorism. Once found, the text is then assigned to an active police radio code, translated to its binary equivalent, and sent to the array of police cars as a movement sequence. In effect, the data being “snooped” by the authorities is the same data used to control the police vehicles. Thus the police become puppets of their own surveillance. This signifies a reversal of the control of information appropriated by police by using the same information to control them.
  • Cory Arcangel :Boo-yaa Counter Home Edition Jonah Brucker-Cohen : Police State Mark Daggett : Carnivore is Sorry Lisa Jevbratt : Out of the Ordinary Paul Johnson : RSG — CSCPU - 5 MTAA — Mark River et Tim Whidden : The Gordon Matta-Clark Encryption Method
  • One indicator of the historical significance of Olia Lialina's 1996 Net Art project, My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (MBCBFTW), is the numerous times it has been appropriated and remixed by other new media artists. On her Web site, Lialina maintains an extensive list of these appropriations that includes versions in Flash, Real Audio, VRML, the Castle Wolfenstein game engine (Mac and PC), PowerPoint, and video. There is even a blog version and a version in gouache on paper. But what is it that makes this particular work so influential? Perhaps it resonates with other artists because it is among the earliest works of New Media art to produce the kind of compelling and emotionally powerful experience that we have come to expect from older, more established media, particularly film. MBCBFTW tells the story of two lovers who reunite after an unspecified military conflict. Fragments of disjunctive dialogue convey the profound difficulty the couple has reconnecting. The female protagonist confesses that she had an affair with a neighbor while her significant other was away fighting for their country. The returned soldier proposes marriage. The non-linear narrative unfolds through grainy black and white images and bits of text in white text on a black background. Clicking on a linked text or image splits the frame into smaller frames, each revealing a new text or image. The narrative splits as well, unraveling into multiple threads. This flow produces an effect similar to a cinematic montage in which separate but simultaneous actions are edited together to produce temporal and spatial juxtapositions. Eventually, the images and texts stop appearing, leaving most of the screen a mosaic of empty black frames.
  • One indicator of the historical significance of Olia Lialina's 1996 Net Art project, My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (MBCBFTW), is the numerous times it has been appropriated and remixed by other new media artists. On her Web site, Lialina maintains an extensive list of these appropriations that includes versions in Flash, Real Audio, VRML, the Castle Wolfenstein game engine (Mac and PC), PowerPoint, and video. There is even a blog version and a version in gouache on paper. But what is it that makes this particular work so influential? Perhaps it resonates with other artists because it is among the earliest works of New Media art to produce the kind of compelling and emotionally powerful experience that we have come to expect from older, more established media, particularly film. MBCBFTW tells the story of two lovers who reunite after an unspecified military conflict. Fragments of disjunctive dialogue convey the profound difficulty the couple has reconnecting. The female protagonist confesses that she had an affair with a neighbor while her significant other was away fighting for their country. The returned soldier proposes marriage. The non-linear narrative unfolds through grainy black and white images and bits of text in white text on a black background. Clicking on a linked text or image splits the frame into smaller frames, each revealing a new text or image. The narrative splits as well, unraveling into multiple threads. This flow produces an effect similar to a cinematic montage in which separate but simultaneous actions are edited together to produce temporal and spatial juxtapositions. Eventually, the images and texts stop appearing, leaving most of the screen a mosaic of empty black frames.
  • One indicator of the historical significance of Olia Lialina's 1996 Net Art project, My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (MBCBFTW), is the numerous times it has been appropriated and remixed by other new media artists. On her Web site, Lialina maintains an extensive list of these appropriations that includes versions in Flash, Real Audio, VRML, the Castle Wolfenstein game engine (Mac and PC), PowerPoint, and video. There is even a blog version and a version in gouache on paper. But what is it that makes this particular work so influential? Perhaps it resonates with other artists because it is among the earliest works of New Media art to produce the kind of compelling and emotionally powerful experience that we have come to expect from older, more established media, particularly film. MBCBFTW tells the story of two lovers who reunite after an unspecified military conflict. Fragments of disjunctive dialogue convey the profound difficulty the couple has reconnecting. The female protagonist confesses that she had an affair with a neighbor while her significant other was away fighting for their country. The returned soldier proposes marriage. The non-linear narrative unfolds through grainy black and white images and bits of text in white text on a black background. Clicking on a linked text or image splits the frame into smaller frames, each revealing a new text or image. The narrative splits as well, unraveling into multiple threads. This flow produces an effect similar to a cinematic montage in which separate but simultaneous actions are edited together to produce temporal and spatial juxtapositions. Eventually, the images and texts stop appearing, leaving most of the screen a mosaic of empty black frames.
  • One indicator of the historical significance of Olia Lialina's 1996 Net Art project, My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (MBCBFTW), is the numerous times it has been appropriated and remixed by other new media artists. On her Web site, Lialina maintains an extensive list of these appropriations that includes versions in Flash, Real Audio, VRML, the Castle Wolfenstein game engine (Mac and PC), PowerPoint, and video. There is even a blog version and a version in gouache on paper. But what is it that makes this particular work so influential? Perhaps it resonates with other artists because it is among the earliest works of New Media art to produce the kind of compelling and emotionally powerful experience that we have come to expect from older, more established media, particularly film. MBCBFTW tells the story of two lovers who reunite after an unspecified military conflict. Fragments of disjunctive dialogue convey the profound difficulty the couple has reconnecting. The female protagonist confesses that she had an affair with a neighbor while her significant other was away fighting for their country. The returned soldier proposes marriage. The non-linear narrative unfolds through grainy black and white images and bits of text in white text on a black background. Clicking on a linked text or image splits the frame into smaller frames, each revealing a new text or image. The narrative splits as well, unraveling into multiple threads. This flow produces an effect similar to a cinematic montage in which separate but simultaneous actions are edited together to produce temporal and spatial juxtapositions. Eventually, the images and texts stop appearing, leaving most of the screen a mosaic of empty black frames.
  • One indicator of the historical significance of Olia Lialina's 1996 Net Art project, My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (MBCBFTW), is the numerous times it has been appropriated and remixed by other new media artists. On her Web site, Lialina maintains an extensive list of these appropriations that includes versions in Flash, Real Audio, VRML, the Castle Wolfenstein game engine (Mac and PC), PowerPoint, and video. There is even a blog version and a version in gouache on paper. But what is it that makes this particular work so influential? Perhaps it resonates with other artists because it is among the earliest works of New Media art to produce the kind of compelling and emotionally powerful experience that we have come to expect from older, more established media, particularly film. MBCBFTW tells the story of two lovers who reunite after an unspecified military conflict. Fragments of disjunctive dialogue convey the profound difficulty the couple has reconnecting. The female protagonist confesses that she had an affair with a neighbor while her significant other was away fighting for their country. The returned soldier proposes marriage. The non-linear narrative unfolds through grainy black and white images and bits of text in white text on a black background. Clicking on a linked text or image splits the frame into smaller frames, each revealing a new text or image. The narrative splits as well, unraveling into multiple threads. This flow produces an effect similar to a cinematic montage in which separate but simultaneous actions are edited together to produce temporal and spatial juxtapositions. Eventually, the images and texts stop appearing, leaving most of the screen a mosaic of empty black frames.
  • One indicator of the historical significance of Olia Lialina's 1996 Net Art project, My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (MBCBFTW), is the numerous times it has been appropriated and remixed by other new media artists. On her Web site, Lialina maintains an extensive list of these appropriations that includes versions in Flash, Real Audio, VRML, the Castle Wolfenstein game engine (Mac and PC), PowerPoint, and video. There is even a blog version and a version in gouache on paper. But what is it that makes this particular work so influential? Perhaps it resonates with other artists because it is among the earliest works of New Media art to produce the kind of compelling and emotionally powerful experience that we have come to expect from older, more established media, particularly film. MBCBFTW tells the story of two lovers who reunite after an unspecified military conflict. Fragments of disjunctive dialogue convey the profound difficulty the couple has reconnecting. The female protagonist confesses that she had an affair with a neighbor while her significant other was away fighting for their country. The returned soldier proposes marriage. The non-linear narrative unfolds through grainy black and white images and bits of text in white text on a black background. Clicking on a linked text or image splits the frame into smaller frames, each revealing a new text or image. The narrative splits as well, unraveling into multiple threads. This flow produces an effect similar to a cinematic montage in which separate but simultaneous actions are edited together to produce temporal and spatial juxtapositions. Eventually, the images and texts stop appearing, leaving most of the screen a mosaic of empty black frames.
  • One indicator of the historical significance of Olia Lialina's 1996 Net Art project, My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (MBCBFTW), is the numerous times it has been appropriated and remixed by other new media artists. On her Web site, Lialina maintains an extensive list of these appropriations that includes versions in Flash, Real Audio, VRML, the Castle Wolfenstein game engine (Mac and PC), PowerPoint, and video. There is even a blog version and a version in gouache on paper. But what is it that makes this particular work so influential? Perhaps it resonates with other artists because it is among the earliest works of New Media art to produce the kind of compelling and emotionally powerful experience that we have come to expect from older, more established media, particularly film. MBCBFTW tells the story of two lovers who reunite after an unspecified military conflict. Fragments of disjunctive dialogue convey the profound difficulty the couple has reconnecting. The female protagonist confesses that she had an affair with a neighbor while her significant other was away fighting for their country. The returned soldier proposes marriage. The non-linear narrative unfolds through grainy black and white images and bits of text in white text on a black background. Clicking on a linked text or image splits the frame into smaller frames, each revealing a new text or image. The narrative splits as well, unraveling into multiple threads. This flow produces an effect similar to a cinematic montage in which separate but simultaneous actions are edited together to produce temporal and spatial juxtapositions. Eventually, the images and texts stop appearing, leaving most of the screen a mosaic of empty black frames.
  • One indicator of the historical significance of Olia Lialina's 1996 Net Art project, My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (MBCBFTW), is the numerous times it has been appropriated and remixed by other new media artists. On her Web site, Lialina maintains an extensive list of these appropriations that includes versions in Flash, Real Audio, VRML, the Castle Wolfenstein game engine (Mac and PC), PowerPoint, and video. There is even a blog version and a version in gouache on paper. But what is it that makes this particular work so influential? Perhaps it resonates with other artists because it is among the earliest works of New Media art to produce the kind of compelling and emotionally powerful experience that we have come to expect from older, more established media, particularly film. MBCBFTW tells the story of two lovers who reunite after an unspecified military conflict. Fragments of disjunctive dialogue convey the profound difficulty the couple has reconnecting. The female protagonist confesses that she had an affair with a neighbor while her significant other was away fighting for their country. The returned soldier proposes marriage. The non-linear narrative unfolds through grainy black and white images and bits of text in white text on a black background. Clicking on a linked text or image splits the frame into smaller frames, each revealing a new text or image. The narrative splits as well, unraveling into multiple threads. This flow produces an effect similar to a cinematic montage in which separate but simultaneous actions are edited together to produce temporal and spatial juxtapositions. Eventually, the images and texts stop appearing, leaving most of the screen a mosaic of empty black frames.
  • One indicator of the historical significance of Olia Lialina's 1996 Net Art project, My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (MBCBFTW), is the numerous times it has been appropriated and remixed by other new media artists. On her Web site, Lialina maintains an extensive list of these appropriations that includes versions in Flash, Real Audio, VRML, the Castle Wolfenstein game engine (Mac and PC), PowerPoint, and video. There is even a blog version and a version in gouache on paper. But what is it that makes this particular work so influential? Perhaps it resonates with other artists because it is among the earliest works of New Media art to produce the kind of compelling and emotionally powerful experience that we have come to expect from older, more established media, particularly film. MBCBFTW tells the story of two lovers who reunite after an unspecified military conflict. Fragments of disjunctive dialogue convey the profound difficulty the couple has reconnecting. The female protagonist confesses that she had an affair with a neighbor while her significant other was away fighting for their country. The returned soldier proposes marriage. The non-linear narrative unfolds through grainy black and white images and bits of text in white text on a black background. Clicking on a linked text or image splits the frame into smaller frames, each revealing a new text or image. The narrative splits as well, unraveling into multiple threads. This flow produces an effect similar to a cinematic montage in which separate but simultaneous actions are edited together to produce temporal and spatial juxtapositions. Eventually, the images and texts stop appearing, leaving most of the screen a mosaic of empty black frames.
  • Carnivore é uma ferramenta de espionagem de redes de transmissão de dados do FBI. O coletivo Radical Software Group propõe então uma versão pessoal CarnivorePE, capaz de rastrear o tráfego de internet (web, e-mail, ftp, etc.) em uma rede específica. Os dados captados são então utilizados para interfaces gráficas chamadas clientes, que apresentam animações e gráficos com os diagnósticos obtidos. O código aberto, escrito em Processing, pode ser baixado pela internet.
  • O primeiro cliente foi chamado de Carnivore Personal Edition Zero Client (número de série RSG-CPE0C-1). Foi desenvolvido em linguagem Perl pelo RSG e rodou em um terminal a partir de um servidor Linux. A trilha sonora utilizada foi apropriada do videogame Half-Life.
  • Outros artistas desenvolveram clientes: Joshua Davis/BrandenHall/Shapeshifter
  • Read every bit of cnn.com. 0 moves black horizontally. 1 moves white vertically. Black and white attract to one another.
  • Read every bit of cnn.com. 0 moves black horizontally. 1 moves white vertically. Black and white attract to one another.
  • World Wall Painters (Pintores de Muros Mundiais) é um cliente que explora a informações geográficas dos Ips rastreados pelo Carnivore. O interface marca a bandeira dos países envolvidos no tráfego de informação, resultando em uma colagem de texturas que sugerem a heterogeneidade da internet.
  • World Wall Painters (Pintores de Muros Mundiais) é um cliente que explora a informações geográficas dos Ips rastreados pelo Carnivore. O interface marca a bandeira dos países envolvidos no tráfego de informação, resultando em uma colagem de texturas que sugerem a heterogeneidade da internet.
  • Synopsis: JJ is a software agent which uses facial expressions to visualize the emotional content of network traffic. Serving as both a network surveillance tool and an empathic information visualization, JJ is implemented as a Carnivore Client, an open-source format for network surveillance applications. JJ is an autonomous software agent who displays facial expressions appropriate to the emotional content of the words that are presented to him. Implemented as a Carnivore Client, JJ literally "puts a face" on the information transmitted through his host network, in order to provide a data visualization of the network's "emotional content." JJ operates according to a mapping established between two well-known psychological databases: (A) Ekman and Friesen's set of "universal facial expressions" — the set of face photographs which have been shown to embody basic cross-cultural human emotions (namely: anger, fear, surprise, disgust, sadness and pleasure) — and (B) the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) dictionary by Pennebaker, Francis, & Booth, which categorizes the "emotional associations" of several thousand common English words, and provides an efficient and effective method for evaluating the various affective components present in verbal and written speech samples.
  • PoliceState is a Carnivore client that attempts to reverse the surveillance role of law enforcement into a subservient one for the data being gathered. The client consists of a fleet of 20 radio controlled police vehicles that are all simultaneously controlled by data coming into the main client. The client looks for packet information relating to domestic US terrorism. Once found, the text is then assigned to an active police radio code, translated to its binary equivalent, and sent to the array of police cars as a movement sequence. In effect, the data being “snooped” by the authorities is the same data used to control the police vehicles. Thus the police become puppets of their own surveillance. This signifies a reversal of the control of information appropriated by police by using the same information to control them.
  • Cory Arcangel :Boo-yaa Counter Home Edition Jonah Brucker-Cohen : Police State Mark Daggett : Carnivore is Sorry Lisa Jevbratt : Out of the Ordinary Paul Johnson : RSG — CSCPU - 5 MTAA — Mark River et Tim Whidden : The Gordon Matta-Clark Encryption Method
  • Here on AfterSherrieLevine.com you will find a browsable selection of these images. Links to the high-resolution exhibition-quality images to download and print out. Along with a certificate of authenticity for each image, which you print out and sign yourself, as well as directions on how to frame the image so that it will fulfill the requirements of the certificate.
  • Super Mario Clouds is an old Mario Brothers cartridge which I modified to erase everything but the clouds. Check below for the ROM, a link to the source code, a gif, and instructions on how 2 make it yourself. So, first the gif,......when I originally posted this on the Internet in 02, the web wasn’t actually able to contain video (it sounds funny now, but remember youtube didn’t start making waves till like 05ish??), therefore I made a gif of the video.
  • Opus seeks to build a creative commons with a community of media practitioners, artists, authors and the public from all over the world. Here people can present their own work and make it open for transformation, besides intervening and transforming the work of others by bringing in new materials, practices and insights. The Discussion forums are there to open out the works to comments and reflections. Opus follows the same rules as those that operate in all free software communities - i.e. the freedom to view, to download, to modify and to redistribute. The source(code), in this case the video, image, sound or text, is free to use, to edit and to redistribute.
  • osso projeto é baseado nas câmeras Elphel, que são licenciadas como open hardware. São as mesmas câmeras usadas nas imagens do Google Street View. Embora não tenham sido pensadas para se fazer cinema, uma discussão iniciada no fórum do site DV Info por volta de 2006 atentou para esta possibilidade. Iniciou-se uma longa pesquisa de como seria possível fazer filmes a partir de um de seus modelos – na época, o 333 -, o que deu origem a vários protótipos de como montá-la para gravar. Assim surgiu a comunidade Apertus, voltada especificamente para este fim, e dona de um site e comunidades próprios a partir de 2010. Ao final daquele ano começaríamos o nosso envolvimento, buscando um caminho para editar os vídeos gravados em linux.
  • osso projeto é baseado nas câmeras Elphel, que são licenciadas como open hardware. São as mesmas câmeras usadas nas imagens do Google Street View. Embora não tenham sido pensadas para se fazer cinema, uma discussão iniciada no fórum do site DV Info por volta de 2006 atentou para esta possibilidade. Iniciou-se uma longa pesquisa de como seria possível fazer filmes a partir de um de seus modelos – na época, o 333 -, o que deu origem a vários protótipos de como montá-la para gravar. Assim surgiu a comunidade Apertus, voltada especificamente para este fim, e dona de um site e comunidades próprios a partir de 2010. Ao final daquele ano começaríamos o nosso envolvimento, buscando um caminho para editar os vídeos gravados em linux.
  • A instalação Crepúsculo dos Ídolos é um ambiente com cinco TVs ligadas em um canal de TV aberta, uma câmera e um microfone à frente delas. Quando o visitante produz algum som próximo ao microfone a imagem das TVs distorce de acordo com a intensidade e o tempo de duração do som produzido pelo visitante. As distorções evoluem seguindo algumas cores do crepúsculo: amarelo, laranja, vermelho, azul. Após passar pela cor azul, a imagem do canal desaparece e em seu lugar aparece a imagem do visitante com um efeito de brilho que também varia de acordo com a intensidade de sua voz. Enquanto o visitante produzir som, sua imagem permanece na TV. Quando houver silêncio as TVs voltam, aos poucos, a exibir a imagem do canal, como antes.
  • Panorama internacional da arte eletrônica

    1. 1. Panorama internacional da artemídiaDaniel HoraUniversidade de Brasília | Instituto de ArtesDepartamento de Artes Visuais | Brasília, 2013
    2. 2. http://wwwwwwwww.jodi.org/, 1995 - jodiarte digital: arte e tecnologia + arte comunicaçãodesconstrução da linguagem tecnológica (Nam June Paik)remixagem de elementos encontrados (Dada)o meio de comunicação como suporte para a arte (arte postal)internet: informacionalismo, redes distribuídas, globalização
    3. 3. Temas e tendências da artemídiaColaboração e participaçãoApropriação e código abertoParódia corporativaHackerismo e hacktivismoIntervençõesIdentidadeTelepresença e vigilânciaReferências:TRIBE, Mark; JANA, Reena. New MediaArt. Colônia, Alemanha: Taschen, 2009.+ pesquisas próprias em catálogos epáginas de artistas, publicações einstituições na internet
    4. 4. Colaboração e participaçãoherança da arteparticipativa – perfomancee happeningsUmbrella.net, 2005Jonah Brucker-Cohen andKatherine MoriwakiUma série de guarda-chuvasbrancos circulam em um espaçopúblico, equipados computadoresportáteis que formam uma redede comunicação entre si,demonstrada pelo uso deiluminação com LEDs
    5. 5. Colaboração e participaçãoherança da arteparticipativa – perfomancee happeningsDialtones: A Telesymphony, 2001Golan Levin and collaboratorsConcerto de larga escalaproduzido inteiramente com ossons coreografados dos celularesda audiência
    6. 6. Colaboração e participaçãocoletivos, grupos, redes, alcateias, enxames, matilhasDobras/Folds, 1997Corpos Informáticos
    7. 7. Colaboração e participaçãoComo no cinema, projetoscomplexos exigem formaçõesdiversasenvolvimento deprogramadores, artistas,ativistas, entre outroscoletivos como opçãocrítica e tática – contra oautoritarismo autoral e ocorporativismo capitalistaCarnivore Personal Edition, 2001Radical Software Group
    8. 8. Carnivore Personal Edition, 2001Radical Software Group
    9. 9. CPE Zero Client, 2001Radical Software Group
    10. 10. Amalgamatmosphere, 2001Joshua Davis + Branden Hall + Shapeshifter
    11. 11. Guernica, 2001Entropy8Zuper!
    12. 12. Guernica, 2001Entropy8Zuper!
    13. 13. Black and White, 2003Mark Napier
    14. 14. Fuel, 2002Scott Snibbe
    15. 15. World Wall Paper, 2002area3
    16. 16. JJ (Empathic Network Visualization), 2002Golan Levin
    17. 17. PoliceState, 2003Jonah Brucker-Cohen
    18. 18. Active_Metaphor, 2002Limiteazero
    19. 19. Colaboração e participaçãoNBP, 1993Ricardo Basbaumhttp://nbp.pro.br/
    20. 20. Colaboração e participaçãoWikinarua, 2009Suzete Venturelli eLaboratório dePesquisa em Arte eRealidadeAumentadahttp://wikinarua.com/
    21. 21. Colaboração e participaçãointeratividadeapropriações e leiturasnão-linearesMy Boyfriend Came Back from theWar, 1996 – Olia LialinaA narrativa se desdobra em telas empreto e branco com fragmentos detexto. Ao clicar em link, a tela sedivide em frames que revelam umnovo texto e imagem correspondentesàs múltiplas ramificações da históriahttp://myboyfriendcamebackfromth.ewar.ru/
    22. 22. My Boyfriend Came Back From the WarRemix, 1998, Vadim Epstein (recovered)
    23. 23. My Boyfriend Came Back From the WarBlog mix, 2004, abe linkoln
    24. 24. My Boyfriend Came Back From the WarChilian version, tribute to Antuco soldiers, Ignacio Nieto, 2005
    25. 25. My Boyfriend Came Back From the WarFlash, 2000, Auriea Harvey&Michael Samyn
    26. 26. My Burger Came Back from the WarHTML, JavaScript, Guthrie Lonergan, 2012
    27. 27. Don Quixote came back from the libraryby santo_file group, 2006
    28. 28. Colaboração e participaçãoComo no cinema, projetoscomplexos exigem formaçõesdiversasenvolvimento deprogramadores, artistas,ativistas, entre outroscoletivos como opçãocrítica e tática – contra oautoritarismo autoral e ocorporativismo capitalistaCarnivore Personal Edition, 2001Radical Software Group
    29. 29. Carnivore Personal Edition, 2001Radical Software Group
    30. 30. CPE Zero Client, 2001Radical Software Group
    31. 31. Amalgamatmosphere, 2001Joshua Davis + Branden Hall + Shapeshifter
    32. 32. Guernica, 2001Entropy8Zuper!
    33. 33. Guernica, 2001Entropy8Zuper!
    34. 34. Black and White, 2003Mark Napier
    35. 35. Fuel, 2002Scott Snibbe
    36. 36. World Wall Paper, 2002area3
    37. 37. JJ (Empathic Network Visualization), 2002Golan Levin
    38. 38. PoliceState, 2003Jonah Brucker-Cohen
    39. 39. Active_Metaphor, 2002Limiteazero
    40. 40. Apropriação e código abertocolagens e materiais do cotidianobancos de dados digitaiscultura do copia e colaAfter Sherrie Levin, 2001Michael MandibergPublicação na internet de imagensescaneadas de um catálogo comfotografias de 1979 da artista SherrieLevine, que por sua vez registramfotos feitas por Walker Evans na épocada Grande Depressão nos EUA.
    41. 41. Apropriação e código abertosoftware livre – cultura livrealternativa de distribuiçãocontra a indústria culturalcultura do compartilhamentoSuper Mario Clouds, 2001Cory ArcangelHackeamento para extrair todoselementos gráficos do game SuperMario Bros, com exceção das nuvens.Código publicado para os interessados
    42. 42. Apropriação e código abertoOPUS (Open Platform for Unlimited Signification), 2001Raqs Media CollectivePlataforma e programa que permite a criação e exibição de produtos de mídia, quepodem ser recombinados no trabalho de outros artistas.
    43. 43. Apropriação e código abertoreferência ao remixhip hop e dance musicBUST DOWN THE DOOR AGAIN! GATES0F HELL-VICTORIA VERSION, 2004Young-Hae Chang Heavy IndustriesRemix do trabalhoBUST DOWN THE DOORS!, de 2000,que narra a história de uma invasãonoturna a uma casa por agressoresdesconhecidos.
    44. 44. Apropriação e código abertoI Love Yr GIF, 2007 – Giselle Beiguelman (remix da net.art para web e app)
    45. 45. Apropriação e código aberto
    46. 46. Apropriação e código aberto
    47. 47. Apropriação e código aberto
    48. 48. Apropriação e código aberto
    49. 49. Paródia corporativaimitação da estética e retórica dos sites de empresasmarcas e slogansAirworld, 1999Jennifer & Kevin McCoyImitação de site corporativo, comseções típicas como soluções,tecnologias, compras e associações.Os textos são produto de uma basede dados de informações captadasem sites comerciais edescontextualizadas. O projeto foidivulgado por meio de banners depublicidade na internet.
    50. 50. Paródia corporativawww.rtmark.com, 1996-2002®TmarkArquivo de projetos do coletivo queimita a linguagem e o visual de sitescorporativos.
    51. 51. Paródia corporativaFreakpedia, 2007Edgar Franco e Fabio FON
    52. 52. Hackerismo e hacktivismoartistas que se consideram hackersou adotam práticas e conceitos da comunidade hackerChild as Audience, 2001Critical Art EnsembleCD-ROM inclui instruções para quebraro código e alterar jogos do consoleGameBoy
    53. 53. Hackerismo e hacktivismohackear o próprio sistema (operacional) da arteFemale Extension, 1997Cornela SollfrankA artista desenvolveu em conjuntocom hackers um software para gerartrabalhos de Net art a partir deamostras e remixagem de elementosde sites existentes. Para indicar osexismo das práticas de curadoria daarte contemporânea, ela submeteu200 projetos a um concurso de umagaleria, com autoria identificada compseudônimos femininos.
    54. 54. Hackerismo e hacktivismoBlinkenlights, 1997Chaos Computer Clubhttp://blinkenlights.net/
    55. 55. Hackerismo e hacktivismoFloresta Vermelha, 2012Direção: Flavio Soareshttp://florestavermelha.org/
    56. 56. Hackerismo e hacktivismoEngrenagem, 2007Maíra Salahttp://geral.etc.br/engranaje/
    57. 57. Hackerismo e hacktivismorelação com movimentos sociais e desobediência civilZapatista TacticalFloodnet,1998Electronic DisturbanceTheatre Ataque de negação deserviço contra sites debancos e da presidência doMéxico.
    58. 58. Intervençõesmídia como espaço de intervençãoVelvet Strike,1998Anne Marie Schleiner, Joan Leandre &Brody CondonIntervenções dentro do jogo online debatalhas Counter Strike. As ações incluema manipulação de personagens paraatuações pacíficas, em lugar daagressividade esperada, irritando osjogadores habituais
    59. 59. Intervençõesações mediadas pela tecnologiano espaço urbanoPedestrian, 2001-2002Paul Kaiser and Shelley EshkarProjeção de animações emcomputação gráfica sobre calçadas epraças públicas
    60. 60. IntervençõesSOD, 1999Jodihttp://sod.jodi.org/Modificação do videgame Wolfstein3D.
    61. 61. IntervençõesCrepúsculo dos Ídolos, 2008Jarbas Jácome
    62. 62. Intervençõeswalkmonster_start (), 200JodiPoema publicado na lista de e-mailsNettime, com texto que se comportacomo código-fonte.
    63. 63. Identidadeconstrução e visualizaçãomodo indiretoMouchette.org, 1996 -MouchetteApresentado como trabalho de umamenina de 13 anos, o projeto indica amaleabilidade e indeterminação daidentidade online por meio de umapersonagem de ficção. O artista portrás da iniciativa é desconhecido.
    64. 64. Identidadeconstrução e visualizaçãomodo diretoBrandon, 1998Shu Lea CheangSite sobre a história real deTeena Brandon, uma jovemassassinada por ter se passadopor um rapaz
    65. 65. IdentidadeAndros Hertz, 2004Helga Stein
    66. 66. IdentidadeArtista Invasor, 2006Yuri FirmezaArtista japonês(Souzousareta Geijutsuka)inventado, iludindo amídia.
    67. 67. IdentidadeMarcelo do Campo, 2002Dora Longo Bahiahttp://marcelodocampo.org/
    68. 68. Telepresença e vigilânciaencurtamento e diluição das distânciasTelegarden, 1995Ken GoldbergO projeto permite que pessoasem qualquer lugar do mundocultivem flores e plantas deum jardim por meio docontrole de um braço robóticoacessado em rede.
    69. 69. Telepresença e vigilânciavigilância como– mal necessário– entretenimentoDemonstrate, 2004Ken GoldbergCâmera telerrobótica captaimagens para um site, em queé possível observar atividadesem uma praça do campus deBerkeley da Universidade daCalifórnia, um dos berços domovimento de Liberdade deExpressão na década de 1960
    70. 70. Telepresença e vigilânciaSurveillance Camera Players
    71. 71. Telepresença e vigilânciaResíduos Remotos, 2011-12Tina Velho

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